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Top 10 Biking Vacations of the United States

Since we just posted on how to stay hydrated and cool for your summer biking adventure. We thought we would post some of the top biking vacations located throughout our country.

Summer and Fall are ideal times of the year to get out and get some great exercise and when you couple biking with taking in the scenic views that you get to see firsthand it seems like a win-win!

And to help you as you travel throughout the country, make sure you know exactly where you are and how far you need to go to get to your destinations, by taking along a reliable GPS Cycling Computer from HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com The Garmin Edge 820 Cycling Computer It not only lets you know where you are, where you’re going but also how well your doing. And if you’re traveling as a group, it can keep track of everyone via the group track and Garmin Connect!

PALISADE – Where? Colorado
In Colorado's lush Western Slope, where you'll find the state's famous peach-growing region and up-and-coming wine country, the small town of Palisade hosts the new Fruit and Wine Byway. The well-marked, 25-mile loop—set in the shadow of the 11,000-foot Grand Mesa and the iconic sandstone cliffs known as the Book Cliffs—guides both motorists and cyclists along scenic backcountry roads to more than 50 vineyards, orchards, farms, and fruit stands. There are also shorter routes for those who want to spend less time on the bike and more time tasting wine.

Insider Tip: The picturesque Wine Country Inn, located in a vineyard along the Fruit and Wine Byway, is a fitting base camp for a weekend getaway spent biking through Colorado wine country

SANTA FE – Where? New Mexico
The artist and writer's haven of Santa Fe is also a road and mountain biking mecca. Nestled at the base of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains at 7,000 feet, the vibrant town offers equal parts outdoor adventure and urban sophistication. In 2012, the Santa Fe Metropolitan Planning Organization created detailed maps of the area's bikeways. For the most stunning rides of your life, plan to see at least a portion of the Turquoise Trail National Scenic Byway.

The Santa Fe Century ride has been bringing people together to bike the Turquoise Trail for nearly three decades. More recently, a three-day festival called Bike and Brew celebrates the city's craft beer and cycling scene, with organized rides, cycling clinics, and gourmet beer dinners

TRAVELERS REST – Where? South Carolina
A small town in upstate South Carolina, Travelers Rest is the latest must-visit destination for cyclists. In 2013, retired 17-time Tour de France competitor George Hincapie, who lives in nearby Greenville, opened Hotel Domestique atop a hillside draped in vineyards. The European-style boutique hotel, complete with a fitness studio, Olympic-size pool, and gourmet restaurant, caters to cyclists keen to bike the winding roads through the majestic Blue Ridge Mountains.

SAN JUAN ISLANDS – Where? Washington   (Thought You'd Have to Take a Boat Trip ? :) )
According to the 2015 Bicycle Friendly State ranking, Washington is No. 1, and for the seventh year in a row. In the summer, it's hard to beat biking the San Juan Islands, particularly Orcas, known as the Emerald Isle. The largest of the archipelago, Orcas spans 57 square miles total, bisected by winding rural roads through forests and fields. For a worthy challenge, bike five miles up the epic (12% grade) route to the top of 2,409-foot Mount Constitution. Bring your camera, or better yet you’re GoPro and record the beautiful vistas —the highest point in the San Juans, Constitution serves up jaw-dropping views of the island-dotted sea, with snow-capped Mount Baker looming in the distance.

POINT REYES – Where? California
The small town of Point Reyes Station isn't known as a cycling destination outside of Marin Country. But locals know that after grabbing a sticky bun at The Bovine Bakery, they can ride out in any direction and roll through some of the most beautiful road cycling routes anywhere in the world: north to Marshall or Bodega Bay along the coast; south along Bolinas Lagoon to Stinson Beach and Bolinas (or to climb up Mt. Tam); east to get to the rolling hills of Marin County; or our personal favorite—get really lost in the northeasterly direction, pulling long loops on deserted roads to tiny towns like Tomales and Two Rock.

FREDERICKSBURG – Where? Texas
With seemingly endless miles of hilly, rural roads through vineyards and a pleasantly warm subtropical climate, the Texas Hill Country—roughly the area between Austin and San Antonio—has become synonymous with road biking. Base yourself out of Fredericksburg, a small town with a big German influence (think never-ending Oktoberfest), and more than 400 B&B's, each more charming than the last.

MOAB – Where? Utah
The most famous mountain biking trail in the U.S., and possibly the world, can be found just outside the small, unpretentious town of Moab. Known as Slickrock, the trail is anything but slick. Fat tires literally stick to the grippy Navajo Sandstone for a roller coaster-like ride of steep inclines and hair-raising descents. Don't forget to take in the scenery: Slickrock rolls though some of the best viewpoints in Utah, serving up a red rock panorama stretching from the Colorado River to the 13,000-foot La Sal Mountains.

PHILADELPHIA – Where? Pennsylvania
Since its inception in 1986, the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy has transformed more than 20,000 miles of defunct railways all across the U.S. into bike paths. Pennsylvania is one of the conservancy's star states, with nearly 100 rail trails spanning more than 1,000 miles. Plan for a weekend of cycling in Philadelphia for a fresh twist on the City of Brotherly Love.

Insider Tip: Starting in downtown Philadelphia at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Schuylkill River Trail stretches 27 miles along the water to Valley Forge National Historic Park. Details on the bike path, and all of Pennsylvania’s rail trails, can be found here.
http://www.traillink.com/state/pa-trails.aspx


BURLINGTON - Where: Vermont
The hip foodie town of Burlington is also a standout place for cyclists. The paved 7.5-mile Burlington Bike Path follows the Lake Champlain shoreline in view of the Adirondack Mountains, linking six waterfront parks. It's a pleasant ride on its own, or use it as a connector, to the Lake Champlain Bikeways system, a 1,300-mile network of bike paths linking the best of New England scenery in New York, Vermont, and Quebec.

Insider Tip: Vermont's oldest and largest cycling club, Green Mountain Bicycle Club, maintains a thorough website that tracks everything from Vermont Bike Laws to dozens of detailed bike routes

LOUISVILLE – Where? Kentucky
For bucolic farm-road riding in the Midwest, there's no place like Kentucky Bluegrass Country. Stay in Louisville, home of one of the oldest and most active cycling clubs in the nation, the Louisville Bicycle Club (formerly Louisville Wheelmen). The city fosters a bike-friendly culture and maintains a robust website of cycling information and maps.

Insider Tip: In 2013, Louisville hosted the UCI Cyclocross World Championships at the scenic Eva Bandman Park, located on the Ohio River. It was the first time in history that the event has been held outside of Europe. Eva Bandman remains the premier cyclocross venue in the U.S. and visitors are welcome to ride the course.

So, know that you know how to take care of yourself on those hot, sunny summertime days, go ahead and have that biking adventure you've been thinking about.  Do you know what would make the trip even better? Why not make a point of taking your significant other along to enjoy the ride and sights with you?  Pleasant Times make for Great Memories!  


Travel Information about the biking destinations recommended were provided by Fodors.com.


Read more

Since we just posted on how to stay hydrated and cool for your summer biking adventure. We thought we would post some of the top biking vacations located throughout our country.

Summer and Fall are ideal times of the year to get out and get some great exercise and when you couple biking with taking in the scenic views that you get to see firsthand it seems like a win-win!

And to help you as you travel throughout the country, make sure you know exactly where you are and how far you need to go to get to your destinations, by taking along a reliable GPS Cycling Computer from HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com The Garmin Edge 820 Cycling Computer It not only lets you know where you are, where you’re going but also how well your doing. And if you’re traveling as a group, it can keep track of everyone via the group track and Garmin Connect!

PALISADE – Where? Colorado
In Colorado's lush Western Slope, where you'll find the state's famous peach-growing region and up-and-coming wine country, the small town of Palisade hosts the new Fruit and Wine Byway. The well-marked, 25-mile loop—set in the shadow of the 11,000-foot Grand Mesa and the iconic sandstone cliffs known as the Book Cliffs—guides both motorists and cyclists along scenic backcountry roads to more than 50 vineyards, orchards, farms, and fruit stands. There are also shorter routes for those who want to spend less time on the bike and more time tasting wine.

Insider Tip: The picturesque Wine Country Inn, located in a vineyard along the Fruit and Wine Byway, is a fitting base camp for a weekend getaway spent biking through Colorado wine country

SANTA FE – Where? New Mexico
The artist and writer's haven of Santa Fe is also a road and mountain biking mecca. Nestled at the base of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains at 7,000 feet, the vibrant town offers equal parts outdoor adventure and urban sophistication. In 2012, the Santa Fe Metropolitan Planning Organization created detailed maps of the area's bikeways. For the most stunning rides of your life, plan to see at least a portion of the Turquoise Trail National Scenic Byway.

The Santa Fe Century ride has been bringing people together to bike the Turquoise Trail for nearly three decades. More recently, a three-day festival called Bike and Brew celebrates the city's craft beer and cycling scene, with organized rides, cycling clinics, and gourmet beer dinners

TRAVELERS REST – Where? South Carolina
A small town in upstate South Carolina, Travelers Rest is the latest must-visit destination for cyclists. In 2013, retired 17-time Tour de France competitor George Hincapie, who lives in nearby Greenville, opened Hotel Domestique atop a hillside draped in vineyards. The European-style boutique hotel, complete with a fitness studio, Olympic-size pool, and gourmet restaurant, caters to cyclists keen to bike the winding roads through the majestic Blue Ridge Mountains.

SAN JUAN ISLANDS – Where? Washington   (Thought You'd Have to Take a Boat Trip ? :) )
According to the 2015 Bicycle Friendly State ranking, Washington is No. 1, and for the seventh year in a row. In the summer, it's hard to beat biking the San Juan Islands, particularly Orcas, known as the Emerald Isle. The largest of the archipelago, Orcas spans 57 square miles total, bisected by winding rural roads through forests and fields. For a worthy challenge, bike five miles up the epic (12% grade) route to the top of 2,409-foot Mount Constitution. Bring your camera, or better yet you’re GoPro and record the beautiful vistas —the highest point in the San Juans, Constitution serves up jaw-dropping views of the island-dotted sea, with snow-capped Mount Baker looming in the distance.

POINT REYES – Where? California
The small town of Point Reyes Station isn't known as a cycling destination outside of Marin Country. But locals know that after grabbing a sticky bun at The Bovine Bakery, they can ride out in any direction and roll through some of the most beautiful road cycling routes anywhere in the world: north to Marshall or Bodega Bay along the coast; south along Bolinas Lagoon to Stinson Beach and Bolinas (or to climb up Mt. Tam); east to get to the rolling hills of Marin County; or our personal favorite—get really lost in the northeasterly direction, pulling long loops on deserted roads to tiny towns like Tomales and Two Rock.

FREDERICKSBURG – Where? Texas
With seemingly endless miles of hilly, rural roads through vineyards and a pleasantly warm subtropical climate, the Texas Hill Country—roughly the area between Austin and San Antonio—has become synonymous with road biking. Base yourself out of Fredericksburg, a small town with a big German influence (think never-ending Oktoberfest), and more than 400 B&B's, each more charming than the last.

MOAB – Where? Utah
The most famous mountain biking trail in the U.S., and possibly the world, can be found just outside the small, unpretentious town of Moab. Known as Slickrock, the trail is anything but slick. Fat tires literally stick to the grippy Navajo Sandstone for a roller coaster-like ride of steep inclines and hair-raising descents. Don't forget to take in the scenery: Slickrock rolls though some of the best viewpoints in Utah, serving up a red rock panorama stretching from the Colorado River to the 13,000-foot La Sal Mountains.

PHILADELPHIA – Where? Pennsylvania
Since its inception in 1986, the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy has transformed more than 20,000 miles of defunct railways all across the U.S. into bike paths. Pennsylvania is one of the conservancy's star states, with nearly 100 rail trails spanning more than 1,000 miles. Plan for a weekend of cycling in Philadelphia for a fresh twist on the City of Brotherly Love.

Insider Tip: Starting in downtown Philadelphia at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Schuylkill River Trail stretches 27 miles along the water to Valley Forge National Historic Park. Details on the bike path, and all of Pennsylvania’s rail trails, can be found here.
http://www.traillink.com/state/pa-trails.aspx


BURLINGTON - Where: Vermont
The hip foodie town of Burlington is also a standout place for cyclists. The paved 7.5-mile Burlington Bike Path follows the Lake Champlain shoreline in view of the Adirondack Mountains, linking six waterfront parks. It's a pleasant ride on its own, or use it as a connector, to the Lake Champlain Bikeways system, a 1,300-mile network of bike paths linking the best of New England scenery in New York, Vermont, and Quebec.

Insider Tip: Vermont's oldest and largest cycling club, Green Mountain Bicycle Club, maintains a thorough website that tracks everything from Vermont Bike Laws to dozens of detailed bike routes

LOUISVILLE – Where? Kentucky
For bucolic farm-road riding in the Midwest, there's no place like Kentucky Bluegrass Country. Stay in Louisville, home of one of the oldest and most active cycling clubs in the nation, the Louisville Bicycle Club (formerly Louisville Wheelmen). The city fosters a bike-friendly culture and maintains a robust website of cycling information and maps.

Insider Tip: In 2013, Louisville hosted the UCI Cyclocross World Championships at the scenic Eva Bandman Park, located on the Ohio River. It was the first time in history that the event has been held outside of Europe. Eva Bandman remains the premier cyclocross venue in the U.S. and visitors are welcome to ride the course.

So, know that you know how to take care of yourself on those hot, sunny summertime days, go ahead and have that biking adventure you've been thinking about.  Do you know what would make the trip even better? Why not make a point of taking your significant other along to enjoy the ride and sights with you?  Pleasant Times make for Great Memories!  


Travel Information about the biking destinations recommended were provided by Fodors.com.


Read more

Keeping Cool On Those Summer Bike Outings

High temperatures mean you have to be well prepared to deal with the heat. There’s sunburn to worry about, dehydration and, worst of all, sunstroke. These are potential headaches that come with the season, but there are things you can do to cope with them and still get out there and bike!
Here are some tips for staying cool and healthy if you’re bike touring in hot weather.

1 – Water, water, water
Think about how much you normally drink during the day and then add an extra 1-2 liters. Sip on your water supply during the day, rather than taking in a lot of water all at once. Doing this will help you stay well hydrated and that is a huge factor in coping with the heat. It will also help you not to get cramps while your biking. A great addition to your biking gear that does not take up much room or weight is the Avex Brazos Stainless Steel AutoSeal Water Bottle 24 oz. This Insulated stainless steel water bottle with a double wall, and vacuum insulation to keep your water cold for hours and eliminate external sweating. Whether you're or biking, hiking a desert trail or scaling a mountain, it has the capacity to quench your thirst!  It also has a spout shield to protect against dirt and an ergonomic clip-on handle that attaches to backpacks and other gear

Sometimes it’s hard to drink a lot of just plain water, so you can add some flavorings. We suggest adding a little iced tea powder, with a squeeze of lemon juice or about 20% orange juice to the mix. Clean your bottles well afterward to stop mold from growing in them. Having an insulated bottle to take along with you is a must in the hot weather. 

2 – Find A Water Tap And Get Soaked
While it may not be the most comfortable way to travel, you really won't mind being a little wet when the temperature climbs over 85 degress Cycling with a wet shirt is like instant air conditioning. When it’s really hot, you can stop at any water source you can find (streams are great, or water taps at places like cemeteries and gas stations) and soak your shirt in the water. Try soaking a bandana that you should have with you as a help in sunburn protection around your neck. It’s a little chilly putting the wet shirt back on, but it feels so good and keeps you really nice and cool for about 1/2 an hour. The bonus is that you also wash a bit of sweat out of your shirt, so it’s not so grungy after a long, hot day of riding.

3 – Pick Your Time Of Day
Start early, it really is the best time of day for getting physical and the coolness of the early morning can help you keep a positive attitude as miles fly by under your bike tires. Have a lunchtime siesta and finish your ride in the evening, after the sun starts to set. Riding through the midday heat is the surest way to fry your brain and body during a bike tour. If the temperatures are set to rise above 30°C, (that’s 86 degrees for you Fahrenheit people). Then you can start riding at first light and plan for a lunch break in about 2-3 hours.

4 – Carry Shade With You
A tarp comes in handy on hot days, of course, you want to rest in the shade when at all possible, but what if there isn’t any? Carry a tarp and you can create instant shade, just about anywhere. You can string your tarp between telephone poles and power pylons in sparsely populated areas, making the perfect spot to wait out the heat of the day. When you set up camp, a tarp can also protect your tent from UV damage. So any way you look at it, that tarp can go a long way to making your day better and a little cooler.

5 – Cover Up With Clothing
Look at people who live constantly in a hot climate and you’ll see they almost always cover up with long sleeves and trousers. Why? It’s the best way to protect your body. Wear longer clothing and you also use less sunscreen. As you know from articles hitting the news, some if not all sunscreens do not really measure up to what they say they will do. Aside from the cost and the fact it leaves a film on your skin, people sweat too much for the sunscreen to do its job properly and they never remember to re-apply it often enough during the day. Whether your biking, hiking or running, a good quality shirt that helps keep you dry and wicks away moisture is a good choice.  A high visibility top makes just good sense when your biking so that others can see you coming. The Proviz line of high visible clothing like the Proviz Reflect360 Men's High Visibility Running Jacket
The reflective detailing is designed to help you stand out when on the roads during hours of darkness or poor light.

By using long-sleeved shirts that cover your arms and 3/4 length trousers, you only have to worry about the sunscreen on your faces and small sections of our arms and legs. As long as you get lightweight clothing, it’s not as hot as you might imagine. Remember, cotton clothing is the best-recommended fabric for helping you stay cooler during the hot summer months.

6 – Use A Hydration Pack
A hydration pack is the kind of thing you’d expect to carry on a mountain hike, but it can be handy for bike riders, especially on hot days too, to keep your water or drink of your choice, nice and cold. The Camelbak MULE NV is our choice to carry. It has a narrow-gauge design and is stable for all-terrain action in any weather condition. The CamelBak M.U.L.E. NV Hydration Pack provides plenty of gear storage and water capacity to let you enjoy the riding the trails all day long

We hope the above tips and suggestions will help you to maintain your cycling adventures during the hot summer months.  And before we go, we want to remind you that to keep on track with where you're going this Summer, Fall, and yes even the Winter, on your extended bike rides, why not take along a Cycling Computer, like the Garmin Garmin Explorer 820  The Edge Explore 820 also keeps you connected to the rest of the world with smart notifications, live tracking, social media sharing and automatic uploads to Garmin Connect.  

So now that you have the tips, tricks, and tools to help you beat the summer heat, go ahead and put the pedal (Bike Pedal) to the trail and have some summer fun!

  

Read more

High temperatures mean you have to be well prepared to deal with the heat. There’s sunburn to worry about, dehydration and, worst of all, sunstroke. These are potential headaches that come with the season, but there are things you can do to cope with them and still get out there and bike!
Here are some tips for staying cool and healthy if you’re bike touring in hot weather.

1 – Water, water, water
Think about how much you normally drink during the day and then add an extra 1-2 liters. Sip on your water supply during the day, rather than taking in a lot of water all at once. Doing this will help you stay well hydrated and that is a huge factor in coping with the heat. It will also help you not to get cramps while your biking. A great addition to your biking gear that does not take up much room or weight is the Avex Brazos Stainless Steel AutoSeal Water Bottle 24 oz. This Insulated stainless steel water bottle with a double wall, and vacuum insulation to keep your water cold for hours and eliminate external sweating. Whether you're or biking, hiking a desert trail or scaling a mountain, it has the capacity to quench your thirst!  It also has a spout shield to protect against dirt and an ergonomic clip-on handle that attaches to backpacks and other gear

Sometimes it’s hard to drink a lot of just plain water, so you can add some flavorings. We suggest adding a little iced tea powder, with a squeeze of lemon juice or about 20% orange juice to the mix. Clean your bottles well afterward to stop mold from growing in them. Having an insulated bottle to take along with you is a must in the hot weather. 

2 – Find A Water Tap And Get Soaked
While it may not be the most comfortable way to travel, you really won't mind being a little wet when the temperature climbs over 85 degress Cycling with a wet shirt is like instant air conditioning. When it’s really hot, you can stop at any water source you can find (streams are great, or water taps at places like cemeteries and gas stations) and soak your shirt in the water. Try soaking a bandana that you should have with you as a help in sunburn protection around your neck. It’s a little chilly putting the wet shirt back on, but it feels so good and keeps you really nice and cool for about 1/2 an hour. The bonus is that you also wash a bit of sweat out of your shirt, so it’s not so grungy after a long, hot day of riding.

3 – Pick Your Time Of Day
Start early, it really is the best time of day for getting physical and the coolness of the early morning can help you keep a positive attitude as miles fly by under your bike tires. Have a lunchtime siesta and finish your ride in the evening, after the sun starts to set. Riding through the midday heat is the surest way to fry your brain and body during a bike tour. If the temperatures are set to rise above 30°C, (that’s 86 degrees for you Fahrenheit people). Then you can start riding at first light and plan for a lunch break in about 2-3 hours.

4 – Carry Shade With You
A tarp comes in handy on hot days, of course, you want to rest in the shade when at all possible, but what if there isn’t any? Carry a tarp and you can create instant shade, just about anywhere. You can string your tarp between telephone poles and power pylons in sparsely populated areas, making the perfect spot to wait out the heat of the day. When you set up camp, a tarp can also protect your tent from UV damage. So any way you look at it, that tarp can go a long way to making your day better and a little cooler.

5 – Cover Up With Clothing
Look at people who live constantly in a hot climate and you’ll see they almost always cover up with long sleeves and trousers. Why? It’s the best way to protect your body. Wear longer clothing and you also use less sunscreen. As you know from articles hitting the news, some if not all sunscreens do not really measure up to what they say they will do. Aside from the cost and the fact it leaves a film on your skin, people sweat too much for the sunscreen to do its job properly and they never remember to re-apply it often enough during the day. Whether your biking, hiking or running, a good quality shirt that helps keep you dry and wicks away moisture is a good choice.  A high visibility top makes just good sense when your biking so that others can see you coming. The Proviz line of high visible clothing like the Proviz Reflect360 Men's High Visibility Running Jacket
The reflective detailing is designed to help you stand out when on the roads during hours of darkness or poor light.

By using long-sleeved shirts that cover your arms and 3/4 length trousers, you only have to worry about the sunscreen on your faces and small sections of our arms and legs. As long as you get lightweight clothing, it’s not as hot as you might imagine. Remember, cotton clothing is the best-recommended fabric for helping you stay cooler during the hot summer months.

6 – Use A Hydration Pack
A hydration pack is the kind of thing you’d expect to carry on a mountain hike, but it can be handy for bike riders, especially on hot days too, to keep your water or drink of your choice, nice and cold. The Camelbak MULE NV is our choice to carry. It has a narrow-gauge design and is stable for all-terrain action in any weather condition. The CamelBak M.U.L.E. NV Hydration Pack provides plenty of gear storage and water capacity to let you enjoy the riding the trails all day long

We hope the above tips and suggestions will help you to maintain your cycling adventures during the hot summer months.  And before we go, we want to remind you that to keep on track with where you're going this Summer, Fall, and yes even the Winter, on your extended bike rides, why not take along a Cycling Computer, like the Garmin Garmin Explorer 820  The Edge Explore 820 also keeps you connected to the rest of the world with smart notifications, live tracking, social media sharing and automatic uploads to Garmin Connect.  

So now that you have the tips, tricks, and tools to help you beat the summer heat, go ahead and put the pedal (Bike Pedal) to the trail and have some summer fun!

  

Read more

Sports Drinks vs. Water: When It’s Best To Use Each

Most runners have repeatedly heard that advice that they must drink more fluids as the hot summer months are on us. Well, it’s not rocket science, who doesn’t drink when it’s hot?
Instead of boring you with yet another “news flash” article about how you need to drink more when it’s hot, let’s look into some of the specifics of summer hydration – when you should be drinking water versus when you should be drinking sports drinks (or an electrolyte beverage) and how to calculate exactly how much fluid you need on any given training run.
This post is about hydration and drinking protocols during training, not during a marathon race or while you’re practicing your marathon nutrition strategy. During marathons or fueling for marathon-specific long runs, refueling is important and another topic entirely.

Fluid absorption rate
First, it’s important you understand how sugar and electrolytes impact your fluid absorption rates. The speed at which water, electrolytes, and sugars can be absorbed into the bloodstream is one of the main determinants of what type of beverage you should choose when trying to stay hydrated.

The absorption of fluids into the body is largely dependent upon two factors: (1) the rate at which it is absorbed through the walls of the small intestine; and (2) the speed at which it is emptied from the stomach. Both of these factors are controlled by the composition of a liquid in terms of its carbohydrate (sugar), and electrolyte concentrations.

As a general rule, the higher the carbohydrate content of your beverage, the slower the absorption rate will be. Consequently, trying to maintain proper hydration and balanced electrolyte levels during a run with sugary sports drinks is difficult. On the other hand, plain water passes through the body too quickly and without providing the necessary sugar to spark the insulin response and ignite the recovery process.

Therefore, your choice for hydration will depend on whether your primary aim is rehydration (keeping the body cool and maintaining fluid balance) or the replenishment of energy (sugar and electrolyte stores).

What is best to drink before and during running?
Most sports drinks on the market are what sports scientists call isotonic, which means they contain a carbohydrate solution that is at 6-8% concentration. These drinks are in the middle of the spectrum in terms of absorption rate, with water being the most readily absorbed (hypotonic) and something like fruit juice, being greater than 8% sugar concentration (hypertonic) being the least absorbable. Because the sugar concentration of most sports drinks is higher than that of most body fluid they are not readily absorbed into the blood stream and are thus not optimal for hydration.

Before and during your run, rehydration should be your main priority. When training in warm conditions, rehydration will allow you to maintain fluid balance and stay cool. Accordingly, your best choice before and during your run would be water, a heavily diluted sports beverage, or water with electrolyte tablets. The best option that we recommend is using an energy tablet packed full of electrolytes like the Nuun All Day Energy Tablet. The great thing about these tablets is that they are sugar-free so they won’t slow down the absorption process, thus your getting hydrated with the things you need to keep you going or to help you replenish after your run.
By drinking water alone, diluting your sports drink, or using electrolyte substitutes, you provide your body with the best combination of electrolyte replacement and immediate absorption. Likewise, electrolytes, especially sodium and potassium, reduce urine output, speed the rate at which fluids empty the stomach, promote absorption from the small intestine, and encourage fluid retention.

Furthermore, not only do you want to shy away from consuming unnecessary amounts of simple sugar when you can avoid it, research shows that when a runner consumes high-glycemic (Gl) foods, like high-sugar sports drinks or energy bars, an hour before a run, he or she may become fatigued more quickly. You have your high and then you get hit with the lows when the sugar intake wears off.

What to drink after running
After you are finished working out, water or a diluted sports drink is not the best choice for your recovery needs. Water and diluted drinks do not contain enough of the sugars and electrolytes that your body needs in order to bring itself back into balance.
In addition, because water or highly diluted drinks are rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream, consuming high quantities results in a rise in plasma volume (in non-technical terms, this means your body is oversaturated with water). This rapid absorption leads to a further imbalance of electrolytes and frequent bathroom stops, which will only increase fluid loss and decrease your desire to drink.

Your best choice post workout is a drink that contains a fair amount of sugars, electrolytes and possibly some protein. Again, the Nuun Sugar-Free, Electrolyte Tablets can be your go-to source of replenishing just what your body needs. Scientific literature has consistently shown that drinking a beverage that contains a 4 to 1 ratio of carbohydrates to protein is optimal for recovery. Therefore, at the very least, you should be drinking a sports drink after you exercise to help ignite the recovery process.
It’s always a good practice to take your fluid of choice with you in an insulated bottle or thermos like the Avex Brazos Autoseal Water Bottle 25oz Easy to transport with a convenient clip-on handle that attaches to gym bags, backpacks, and gear. This Avex bottle will not only keep your drink cold but will ensure pure hydration satisfaction. Whether you're hiking, or working out

Calculating your sweat loss for optimal hydration
When it comes to losing and rehydrating and replenishing electrolytes every runner is different. Some runners are “salty sweaters” and some people sweat very little. The most efficient way to rehydrate properly is to put back exactly how much fluid you’ve lost while running. This will help you avoid an upset stomach from drinking too much, becoming a victim of hypernatremia, or not drinking enough and becoming dehydrated.
Unfortunately, most generalized advice doesn’t cut it when it comes to how much you need to rehydrate: some say drink to thirst, which may not keep up with your own body’s sweat loss rate if you’re a heavy sweater; or 8-10oz per hour, which doesn’t factor in temperature, humidity, or environmental factors.

This makes rehydrating properly sound daunting, but calculating your exact fluid loss in any given temperature and humidity is actually quite easy if you use a sweat loss calculator and create a reference chart. All you need to input is your weight before and after each run, any fluid taken or lost through going to the bathroom, and the distance/time you ran. The calculator will do the hard work for you.
So keep the above tips in mind and get all the fluids you need to train right and cool down right.

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Most runners have repeatedly heard that advice that they must drink more fluids as the hot summer months are on us. Well, it’s not rocket science, who doesn’t drink when it’s hot?
Instead of boring you with yet another “news flash” article about how you need to drink more when it’s hot, let’s look into some of the specifics of summer hydration – when you should be drinking water versus when you should be drinking sports drinks (or an electrolyte beverage) and how to calculate exactly how much fluid you need on any given training run.
This post is about hydration and drinking protocols during training, not during a marathon race or while you’re practicing your marathon nutrition strategy. During marathons or fueling for marathon-specific long runs, refueling is important and another topic entirely.

Fluid absorption rate
First, it’s important you understand how sugar and electrolytes impact your fluid absorption rates. The speed at which water, electrolytes, and sugars can be absorbed into the bloodstream is one of the main determinants of what type of beverage you should choose when trying to stay hydrated.

The absorption of fluids into the body is largely dependent upon two factors: (1) the rate at which it is absorbed through the walls of the small intestine; and (2) the speed at which it is emptied from the stomach. Both of these factors are controlled by the composition of a liquid in terms of its carbohydrate (sugar), and electrolyte concentrations.

As a general rule, the higher the carbohydrate content of your beverage, the slower the absorption rate will be. Consequently, trying to maintain proper hydration and balanced electrolyte levels during a run with sugary sports drinks is difficult. On the other hand, plain water passes through the body too quickly and without providing the necessary sugar to spark the insulin response and ignite the recovery process.

Therefore, your choice for hydration will depend on whether your primary aim is rehydration (keeping the body cool and maintaining fluid balance) or the replenishment of energy (sugar and electrolyte stores).

What is best to drink before and during running?
Most sports drinks on the market are what sports scientists call isotonic, which means they contain a carbohydrate solution that is at 6-8% concentration. These drinks are in the middle of the spectrum in terms of absorption rate, with water being the most readily absorbed (hypotonic) and something like fruit juice, being greater than 8% sugar concentration (hypertonic) being the least absorbable. Because the sugar concentration of most sports drinks is higher than that of most body fluid they are not readily absorbed into the blood stream and are thus not optimal for hydration.

Before and during your run, rehydration should be your main priority. When training in warm conditions, rehydration will allow you to maintain fluid balance and stay cool. Accordingly, your best choice before and during your run would be water, a heavily diluted sports beverage, or water with electrolyte tablets. The best option that we recommend is using an energy tablet packed full of electrolytes like the Nuun All Day Energy Tablet. The great thing about these tablets is that they are sugar-free so they won’t slow down the absorption process, thus your getting hydrated with the things you need to keep you going or to help you replenish after your run.
By drinking water alone, diluting your sports drink, or using electrolyte substitutes, you provide your body with the best combination of electrolyte replacement and immediate absorption. Likewise, electrolytes, especially sodium and potassium, reduce urine output, speed the rate at which fluids empty the stomach, promote absorption from the small intestine, and encourage fluid retention.

Furthermore, not only do you want to shy away from consuming unnecessary amounts of simple sugar when you can avoid it, research shows that when a runner consumes high-glycemic (Gl) foods, like high-sugar sports drinks or energy bars, an hour before a run, he or she may become fatigued more quickly. You have your high and then you get hit with the lows when the sugar intake wears off.

What to drink after running
After you are finished working out, water or a diluted sports drink is not the best choice for your recovery needs. Water and diluted drinks do not contain enough of the sugars and electrolytes that your body needs in order to bring itself back into balance.
In addition, because water or highly diluted drinks are rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream, consuming high quantities results in a rise in plasma volume (in non-technical terms, this means your body is oversaturated with water). This rapid absorption leads to a further imbalance of electrolytes and frequent bathroom stops, which will only increase fluid loss and decrease your desire to drink.

Your best choice post workout is a drink that contains a fair amount of sugars, electrolytes and possibly some protein. Again, the Nuun Sugar-Free, Electrolyte Tablets can be your go-to source of replenishing just what your body needs. Scientific literature has consistently shown that drinking a beverage that contains a 4 to 1 ratio of carbohydrates to protein is optimal for recovery. Therefore, at the very least, you should be drinking a sports drink after you exercise to help ignite the recovery process.
It’s always a good practice to take your fluid of choice with you in an insulated bottle or thermos like the Avex Brazos Autoseal Water Bottle 25oz Easy to transport with a convenient clip-on handle that attaches to gym bags, backpacks, and gear. This Avex bottle will not only keep your drink cold but will ensure pure hydration satisfaction. Whether you're hiking, or working out

Calculating your sweat loss for optimal hydration
When it comes to losing and rehydrating and replenishing electrolytes every runner is different. Some runners are “salty sweaters” and some people sweat very little. The most efficient way to rehydrate properly is to put back exactly how much fluid you’ve lost while running. This will help you avoid an upset stomach from drinking too much, becoming a victim of hypernatremia, or not drinking enough and becoming dehydrated.
Unfortunately, most generalized advice doesn’t cut it when it comes to how much you need to rehydrate: some say drink to thirst, which may not keep up with your own body’s sweat loss rate if you’re a heavy sweater; or 8-10oz per hour, which doesn’t factor in temperature, humidity, or environmental factors.

This makes rehydrating properly sound daunting, but calculating your exact fluid loss in any given temperature and humidity is actually quite easy if you use a sweat loss calculator and create a reference chart. All you need to input is your weight before and after each run, any fluid taken or lost through going to the bathroom, and the distance/time you ran. The calculator will do the hard work for you.
So keep the above tips in mind and get all the fluids you need to train right and cool down right.

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