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How a Heart Rate Monitor Can Help You Burn the Right Calories!

Ok, I'm exercising, counting calories and burning calories, but the weight is still not dropping away fast enough. Is this you? Or have you heard this talk around the water cooler before? Well, let's take a look at the basics first and then tackle the reason's why that weight is not dropping off like you hoped it would.

We call devices that measure heart rate “heart-rate monitors,” but you could also call them “fat-burning monitors” since monitoring your pulse rate during exercise is the best way to promote fat-burning both during and after your workout.

But some people can use heart-rate monitors improperly — to push themselves even harder, which can actually cause fat storage. And others are still focused on a “calories-in, calories out” approach, which has proven ineffective as reflected in the high rates of people who are overweight, which really means they are overfat. The body is a quirky thing that most people do not understand. You see, it has a protective mode that it can drop into when it thinks it's going into "Starvation Mode". 

Some people think that merely by eating less and exercising more they will lose weight. And they are Correct!!  f you do nothing but take the advice found in that phrase, you will lose weight. Unfortunately, some people take that advice to an extreme and suffer some unforeseen consequences. Your body enters what is commonly referred to as "starvation mode" when you don't eat enough which can cause slower than expected weight loss and plateaus. For the short of it, if your body thinks that the food supply is starting to be scarce then what it is used to digesting it will, by it's makeup, begin to store fat and sugar (glucose) which it uses to make energy.  This is a topic for another post in the future, and its an interesting one.

Our weight-conscious society has taught us to focus on the wrong problem: what the scale says. Most people really don’t want to lose weight — they want to reduce body fat because too much makes us bigger and less healthy.

There was a time you could almost tell by looking at a person’s slim appearance that they exercised regularly. That’s all changed. We are now in the midst of an overfat epidemic that used to affect only sedentary people. Now it’s hitting even those who regularly work out. The result has been increased fat in the bodies of runners, walkers, triathletes and those spending untold hours in the gym or working outdoors. The problem has become so common that some are even calling it normal. It’s not.

This story is common. Despite burning a lot of calories during a hard workout, many still can’t get rid of their excess body fat. While too much-stored fat takes up more space, increasing our waist, and, our clothing sizes. In addition, increased body fat, especially around the belly, is associated with chronic inflammation. This may be an early manifestation of various diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer’s and heart disease, not to mention tendinitis, fasciitis, and other “itis” injuries. Burning off excess body fat goes beyond being slim — it’s a priority for optimal health and improved fitness, even helping competitive athletes get faster.

Calorie Catch:
The dilemma faced by millions who burn a lot of exercise calories but still have too much body fat is simple: people are burning the wrong calories. We don’t want to just burn calories. We want to burn fat calories. This requires training the metabolism to burn more fat and less sugar all day and night.

The human body has duel fuel sources — we burn both fat and sugar (glucose) for energy. The big question is how much of each do we use? This depends on each individual’s metabolism. Some people burn high amounts of fat, rely less on sugar, and are slim. Today, more people have impaired fat-burning, resulting in lower energy and higher body fat.

Don’t be fooled into thinking that a harder, high-heart-rate workout leads to a metabolism that burns more fat calories. This approach can burn more sugar and fewer fat calories. Instead, you want to train your metabolism to burn more fat 24 hours a day.

Causes of Reduced Fat-Burning
Fat-burning metabolism is influenced by key lifestyle factors — exercise, food, and stress.
Lower-intensity exercise can improve metabolism to burn more fat, increase energy and reduce fat storage. High-intensity exercise, however, can reduce fat-burning. A heart-rate monitor can help you find the optimal training intensity as discussed below.

Refined carbohydrates, including sugar, impair fat-burning. Healthy fats found in avocados, eggs, butter, coconut and olive oils, and meats can promote fat-burning. If you really want to burn off more body fat, eliminating sugar and other refined carbohydrates and eating healthy fats is important.

Excess stress can also impair fat-burning. In addition to high-intensity training, other forms of stress, such as chemical (diet) and mental (and emotional) can reduce fat-burning too. Managing stress levels, including your exercise program, is another key to fat-burning.
Just by reducing their workout intensity and dietary stress, most people can be burning more body fat in just a few hours.

How Heart Monitors Help
A heart-rate monitor is a basic biofeedback device. With correct use, it can help regulate physical stress during workouts to maintain an intensity that encourages more fat-burning. This can improve metabolism during the workout and for the next 24 hours or more, even while you sleep.

A heart monitor informs you when your workout intensity gets too high so you can slow down. You can monitor walking, running, cycling, group workouts or any exercise (except for strength training, which is usually high-intensity).

What heart rate is best for you? It varies with the individual’s level of both health and fitness. You can check first with your doctor for the right guidelines to check to see what rate you should be at before you start your training and to also make sure you in good enough shape to begin a rigorous training program.

A heart monitor can also help evaluate whether you are indeed on the right track. Why wait weeks or months only to find body fat has not changed much? A simple test can tell us. As we burn more body fat, aerobic muscle function improves and you will be able to walk, run, bike or otherwise go faster at the same heart rate. This is especially important for competitive athletes. This is called, developing Maximum Aerobic Function, or MAF. The MAF Test helps take the guesswork out of training.
If your body fat is too high, stop counting workout calories, slow down and burn fat, and use a heart monitor to ensure your success.  

 

 

Read more

Ok, I'm exercising, counting calories and burning calories, but the weight is still not dropping away fast enough. Is this you? Or have you heard this talk around the water cooler before? Well, let's take a look at the basics first and then tackle the reason's why that weight is not dropping off like you hoped it would.

We call devices that measure heart rate “heart-rate monitors,” but you could also call them “fat-burning monitors” since monitoring your pulse rate during exercise is the best way to promote fat-burning both during and after your workout.

But some people can use heart-rate monitors improperly — to push themselves even harder, which can actually cause fat storage. And others are still focused on a “calories-in, calories out” approach, which has proven ineffective as reflected in the high rates of people who are overweight, which really means they are overfat. The body is a quirky thing that most people do not understand. You see, it has a protective mode that it can drop into when it thinks it's going into "Starvation Mode". 

Some people think that merely by eating less and exercising more they will lose weight. And they are Correct!!  f you do nothing but take the advice found in that phrase, you will lose weight. Unfortunately, some people take that advice to an extreme and suffer some unforeseen consequences. Your body enters what is commonly referred to as "starvation mode" when you don't eat enough which can cause slower than expected weight loss and plateaus. For the short of it, if your body thinks that the food supply is starting to be scarce then what it is used to digesting it will, by it's makeup, begin to store fat and sugar (glucose) which it uses to make energy.  This is a topic for another post in the future, and its an interesting one.

Our weight-conscious society has taught us to focus on the wrong problem: what the scale says. Most people really don’t want to lose weight — they want to reduce body fat because too much makes us bigger and less healthy.

There was a time you could almost tell by looking at a person’s slim appearance that they exercised regularly. That’s all changed. We are now in the midst of an overfat epidemic that used to affect only sedentary people. Now it’s hitting even those who regularly work out. The result has been increased fat in the bodies of runners, walkers, triathletes and those spending untold hours in the gym or working outdoors. The problem has become so common that some are even calling it normal. It’s not.

This story is common. Despite burning a lot of calories during a hard workout, many still can’t get rid of their excess body fat. While too much-stored fat takes up more space, increasing our waist, and, our clothing sizes. In addition, increased body fat, especially around the belly, is associated with chronic inflammation. This may be an early manifestation of various diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer’s and heart disease, not to mention tendinitis, fasciitis, and other “itis” injuries. Burning off excess body fat goes beyond being slim — it’s a priority for optimal health and improved fitness, even helping competitive athletes get faster.

Calorie Catch:
The dilemma faced by millions who burn a lot of exercise calories but still have too much body fat is simple: people are burning the wrong calories. We don’t want to just burn calories. We want to burn fat calories. This requires training the metabolism to burn more fat and less sugar all day and night.

The human body has duel fuel sources — we burn both fat and sugar (glucose) for energy. The big question is how much of each do we use? This depends on each individual’s metabolism. Some people burn high amounts of fat, rely less on sugar, and are slim. Today, more people have impaired fat-burning, resulting in lower energy and higher body fat.

Don’t be fooled into thinking that a harder, high-heart-rate workout leads to a metabolism that burns more fat calories. This approach can burn more sugar and fewer fat calories. Instead, you want to train your metabolism to burn more fat 24 hours a day.

Causes of Reduced Fat-Burning
Fat-burning metabolism is influenced by key lifestyle factors — exercise, food, and stress.
Lower-intensity exercise can improve metabolism to burn more fat, increase energy and reduce fat storage. High-intensity exercise, however, can reduce fat-burning. A heart-rate monitor can help you find the optimal training intensity as discussed below.

Refined carbohydrates, including sugar, impair fat-burning. Healthy fats found in avocados, eggs, butter, coconut and olive oils, and meats can promote fat-burning. If you really want to burn off more body fat, eliminating sugar and other refined carbohydrates and eating healthy fats is important.

Excess stress can also impair fat-burning. In addition to high-intensity training, other forms of stress, such as chemical (diet) and mental (and emotional) can reduce fat-burning too. Managing stress levels, including your exercise program, is another key to fat-burning.
Just by reducing their workout intensity and dietary stress, most people can be burning more body fat in just a few hours.

How Heart Monitors Help
A heart-rate monitor is a basic biofeedback device. With correct use, it can help regulate physical stress during workouts to maintain an intensity that encourages more fat-burning. This can improve metabolism during the workout and for the next 24 hours or more, even while you sleep.

A heart monitor informs you when your workout intensity gets too high so you can slow down. You can monitor walking, running, cycling, group workouts or any exercise (except for strength training, which is usually high-intensity).

What heart rate is best for you? It varies with the individual’s level of both health and fitness. You can check first with your doctor for the right guidelines to check to see what rate you should be at before you start your training and to also make sure you in good enough shape to begin a rigorous training program.

A heart monitor can also help evaluate whether you are indeed on the right track. Why wait weeks or months only to find body fat has not changed much? A simple test can tell us. As we burn more body fat, aerobic muscle function improves and you will be able to walk, run, bike or otherwise go faster at the same heart rate. This is especially important for competitive athletes. This is called, developing Maximum Aerobic Function, or MAF. The MAF Test helps take the guesswork out of training.
If your body fat is too high, stop counting workout calories, slow down and burn fat, and use a heart monitor to ensure your success.  

 

 

Read more

Winter Months and The Increase in High Blood Pressure

We all know that the winter season brings us the coldest days of the year, it’s natural to keep an eye on outside temperatures to make decisions about outdoor apparel and transportation. If you are among the one in three adults in the United States with high blood pressure, you should also check your blood pressure frequently, particularly in winter. Based on the numbers, you may need adjustments in your lifestyle as well.

A study conducted by the VA Medical Center in Washington, D.C., revealed that blood pressures are higher in winter months. Published earlier this year in Circulation, a journal of the American Heart Association, the study reviewed health records of 443,632 veterans nationwide during a five-year period. The research showed that blood pressures were consistently higher during the winter in 60 percent of the veterans studied.

Because the study’s data also revealed that the pattern held true even in southern climates with milder winters, the researchers speculated that perhaps sedentary lifestyles and weight gain during winter months might be partly to blame. Other physicians and researchers feel that stress and food choices with high fat or sodium may be potential culprits for higher blood pressure at this time of year.

Let’s Talk Numbers
High blood pressure (also called hypertension) involves blood that travels through arteries with an increased force. If the heart is pumping against high pressure for a long time, like any other muscle it thickens and eventually becomes less effective. Damage can occur to the heart or other organs such as the brain, kidneys, and eyes. Over time, hypertension raises the risk for stroke, heart attack, heart failure and kidney disease.”

Blood pressure is measured as systolic pressure (when the heart is contracting over diastolic pressure (when the heart relaxes between heartbeats. A normal blood pressure reading is less than 120/80. Hypertension is diagnosed at 140/90 or higher (130/80 if you are diabetic or have kidney disease). If your systolic blood pressure is between 120 and 139, or your diastolic pressure is between 80 and 89, you are considered at risk or “pre-hypertensive.”

Should You Be Worried?
High blood pressure is often referred to as the ’silent killer’ since it may occur for decades with no symptoms.

More than 20 percent of those with high blood pressure are unaware that they have it, and more than half of those with hypertension are not treating it, according to the American Heart Association.

While most people have no symptoms at all, if blood pressure rises to very high levels, you may experience a headache, dizziness, blurred vision, shortness of breath, or abdominal or chest pain. Unfortunately, a number of people only find out that they have hypertension after they suffer a heart attack or stroke.

Knowing the risk factors for high blood pressure is one way to evaluate your chance of developing the disorder.

Age is one of the biggest risk factors since arteries narrow with the years, which naturally increases blood pressure. So, even if your blood pressure has been fine in the past, regular checks are still needed.

The following factors can increase your chance of developing high blood pressure:

Age: Generally, both systolic and diastolic blood pressure increase up to middle age. By age 50, the diastolic pressure levels off, while the systolic pressure continues to increase.
Gender: High blood pressure is more common in men up to middle age. Women are more prone to hypertension after menopause.
Genetics: High blood pressure often runs in families.
Race: More than 40 percent of blacks have hypertension, and it often develops earlier in life.
Weight: Those who are overweight or obese have a larger volume of blood, which increases pressure on artery walls.
Alcohol: Having more than two drinks a day can elevate blood pressure.
Smoking: Chemicals in tobacco can damage and narrow arteries.
Sedentary lifestyle: Inactivity causes higher heart rates, which elevates pressure on arteries and makes the heart work harder.
Poor diet: A diet that is high in salt, fat, and sugar can raise the risk of both high blood pressure and obesity.
Other conditions: High cholesterol, sleep apnea, diabetes and kidney disease all increase the risk of hypertension.

Frequent Testing is Key
Blood pressure cuff in the shape of a heart, You know the drill; every time you visit the doctor, a nurse checks your blood pressure. This is not just a formality — it’s an important medical precaution. And for those who have a high risk for hypertension or already have high blood pressure, once a year is not enough.

If you have borderline or high blood pressure, it’s well worth investing in an at-home blood pressure kit. You are more apt to take regular readings if you can do so at home.

It is recommended that those with blood pressure monitors take them to their physicians to check the monitor's accuracy as well. HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com has a wide variety of Blood Pressure monitoring devices that you can select from. The traditional kind to ones small enough to fit around your wrist and are automatic so they are easy to use and provide accurate readings at a glance. To check out the full line of Blood Pressure Monitors and accessories, just click on this link and see how easy it is for you to have your readings right in your own home.

It is also recommended that patients check their blood pressure at various times of the day and in different situations. If you take medication and your reading is lower in the morning and higher later, you may need to speak with your doctor about changing the time that you take your medication. Additionally, if you start to identify stressful situations that trigger elevations in your blood pressure, it may serve as a motivation to make positive lifestyle changes such as exercising and general stress reduction.

Improving Your Numbers
The reason for frequent blood pressure readings is to aim for early diagnosis and treatment. If your reading is high, you’ll also need to come back for more frequent checks, and your physician will discuss lifestyle changes with you. Actions that can help to reduce blood pressure readings include:

Maintain a healthy weight.
Exercise regularly (30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity, such as brisk walking, five days a week).
If you smoke, quit.
Eat a heart-healthy diet, such as the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) Diet, which is low in fat and sodium and rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low-fat dairy.
Avoid excess alcohol, having no more than one drink daily for women and two for men.
Manage stress.

Raising Awareness, Lowering Risk
Because blood pressure counts rise in winter, frequent checks and wise lifestyle choices are even more imperative now.

See your physician regularly, exercise and eat well, and, if you do need hypertensive medication take it as it is prescribed. Prevention is the best medicine to keep blood pressure in check and avoid life-changing cardiac events.

With the right choices, whether you are currently hypertensive or not, you can be in fine shape to emerge from the winter doldrums and greet the spring!  Which if you look at the calendar, spring is just around the corner.  But, high blood pressure is with you every season of the year, manage it-----manage YOUR LIFE!

 

 

Read more

We all know that the winter season brings us the coldest days of the year, it’s natural to keep an eye on outside temperatures to make decisions about outdoor apparel and transportation. If you are among the one in three adults in the United States with high blood pressure, you should also check your blood pressure frequently, particularly in winter. Based on the numbers, you may need adjustments in your lifestyle as well.

A study conducted by the VA Medical Center in Washington, D.C., revealed that blood pressures are higher in winter months. Published earlier this year in Circulation, a journal of the American Heart Association, the study reviewed health records of 443,632 veterans nationwide during a five-year period. The research showed that blood pressures were consistently higher during the winter in 60 percent of the veterans studied.

Because the study’s data also revealed that the pattern held true even in southern climates with milder winters, the researchers speculated that perhaps sedentary lifestyles and weight gain during winter months might be partly to blame. Other physicians and researchers feel that stress and food choices with high fat or sodium may be potential culprits for higher blood pressure at this time of year.

Let’s Talk Numbers
High blood pressure (also called hypertension) involves blood that travels through arteries with an increased force. If the heart is pumping against high pressure for a long time, like any other muscle it thickens and eventually becomes less effective. Damage can occur to the heart or other organs such as the brain, kidneys, and eyes. Over time, hypertension raises the risk for stroke, heart attack, heart failure and kidney disease.”

Blood pressure is measured as systolic pressure (when the heart is contracting over diastolic pressure (when the heart relaxes between heartbeats. A normal blood pressure reading is less than 120/80. Hypertension is diagnosed at 140/90 or higher (130/80 if you are diabetic or have kidney disease). If your systolic blood pressure is between 120 and 139, or your diastolic pressure is between 80 and 89, you are considered at risk or “pre-hypertensive.”

Should You Be Worried?
High blood pressure is often referred to as the ’silent killer’ since it may occur for decades with no symptoms.

More than 20 percent of those with high blood pressure are unaware that they have it, and more than half of those with hypertension are not treating it, according to the American Heart Association.

While most people have no symptoms at all, if blood pressure rises to very high levels, you may experience a headache, dizziness, blurred vision, shortness of breath, or abdominal or chest pain. Unfortunately, a number of people only find out that they have hypertension after they suffer a heart attack or stroke.

Knowing the risk factors for high blood pressure is one way to evaluate your chance of developing the disorder.

Age is one of the biggest risk factors since arteries narrow with the years, which naturally increases blood pressure. So, even if your blood pressure has been fine in the past, regular checks are still needed.

The following factors can increase your chance of developing high blood pressure:

Age: Generally, both systolic and diastolic blood pressure increase up to middle age. By age 50, the diastolic pressure levels off, while the systolic pressure continues to increase.
Gender: High blood pressure is more common in men up to middle age. Women are more prone to hypertension after menopause.
Genetics: High blood pressure often runs in families.
Race: More than 40 percent of blacks have hypertension, and it often develops earlier in life.
Weight: Those who are overweight or obese have a larger volume of blood, which increases pressure on artery walls.
Alcohol: Having more than two drinks a day can elevate blood pressure.
Smoking: Chemicals in tobacco can damage and narrow arteries.
Sedentary lifestyle: Inactivity causes higher heart rates, which elevates pressure on arteries and makes the heart work harder.
Poor diet: A diet that is high in salt, fat, and sugar can raise the risk of both high blood pressure and obesity.
Other conditions: High cholesterol, sleep apnea, diabetes and kidney disease all increase the risk of hypertension.

Frequent Testing is Key
Blood pressure cuff in the shape of a heart, You know the drill; every time you visit the doctor, a nurse checks your blood pressure. This is not just a formality — it’s an important medical precaution. And for those who have a high risk for hypertension or already have high blood pressure, once a year is not enough.

If you have borderline or high blood pressure, it’s well worth investing in an at-home blood pressure kit. You are more apt to take regular readings if you can do so at home.

It is recommended that those with blood pressure monitors take them to their physicians to check the monitor's accuracy as well. HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com has a wide variety of Blood Pressure monitoring devices that you can select from. The traditional kind to ones small enough to fit around your wrist and are automatic so they are easy to use and provide accurate readings at a glance. To check out the full line of Blood Pressure Monitors and accessories, just click on this link and see how easy it is for you to have your readings right in your own home.

It is also recommended that patients check their blood pressure at various times of the day and in different situations. If you take medication and your reading is lower in the morning and higher later, you may need to speak with your doctor about changing the time that you take your medication. Additionally, if you start to identify stressful situations that trigger elevations in your blood pressure, it may serve as a motivation to make positive lifestyle changes such as exercising and general stress reduction.

Improving Your Numbers
The reason for frequent blood pressure readings is to aim for early diagnosis and treatment. If your reading is high, you’ll also need to come back for more frequent checks, and your physician will discuss lifestyle changes with you. Actions that can help to reduce blood pressure readings include:

Maintain a healthy weight.
Exercise regularly (30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity, such as brisk walking, five days a week).
If you smoke, quit.
Eat a heart-healthy diet, such as the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) Diet, which is low in fat and sodium and rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and low-fat dairy.
Avoid excess alcohol, having no more than one drink daily for women and two for men.
Manage stress.

Raising Awareness, Lowering Risk
Because blood pressure counts rise in winter, frequent checks and wise lifestyle choices are even more imperative now.

See your physician regularly, exercise and eat well, and, if you do need hypertensive medication take it as it is prescribed. Prevention is the best medicine to keep blood pressure in check and avoid life-changing cardiac events.

With the right choices, whether you are currently hypertensive or not, you can be in fine shape to emerge from the winter doldrums and greet the spring!  Which if you look at the calendar, spring is just around the corner.  But, high blood pressure is with you every season of the year, manage it-----manage YOUR LIFE!

 

 

Read more

How’s Your Blood Pressure Doing This Holiday Season?

So we are right in the midst of all the holiday clamor as we all hurry along, shopping for that special gift for the people we care about. From going to pick out that special tree, whether it’s at a tree farm, a local lot or maybe you’re picking your first artificial tree, there is soooo much to do to get ready for this special time of year.

You may be wishing you can spend some down time this time of year with family and friends but in reality, the stress of making your Christmas season, one that is reminiscent of a Norman Rockwell picture, and can very well impact your health, and not too many people pay attention to the warning signs!

The fact is that a lot of pressure comes with the holidays. And so health concerns can  sky-rocket for a lot of people at this time of year. High blood pressure and Christmas do NOT have to go hand in hand.

Could Christmas be bad for your health? Well, it doesn’t have to be.

You may have heard the term, “The silent killer” well, while most people think that it is referring to your blood pressure, the true motivator is “Stress”. Which if you let it, can elevate your pressure to such a state that you can indeed become ill.

The three big causes of high blood pressure and poor health, in general, are poor diet, lack of exercise and stress, tension or anxiety. All three of these factors can grow proportionately during the holiday season. We often find ourselves sitting around the dinner table gorging ourselves on various mixtures of sugar and grease, too stuffed to move and getting annoyed with our relatives.

OK, that’s the worst case scenario, and thankfully it’s never usually that bad. But if we approach the holidays with a bit of forethought we can avoid the holiday snares and still have a good time.

If we keep things in perspective and think things through, the holiday period we can even make Christmas good for your blood pressure.

So what to do? Just try to strike a balance.

Now we know you have all heard the phrase, “Everything in Moderation” Well, that’s because there is a reason for it. Go ahead, enjoy Christmas dinner and the festive parties that happen this time of year, but don’t stuff yourself. Use that "Common Sense" we are all supposed to have. You know that anything in excess is not good for you so keep a reign on your portion sizes and make it a point to engage your friends and distant relatives in some conversations.  This is a great way to keep you from going back for seconds or even thirds at the deseart table.

Make sure you get some exercise on a regular basis this time of year. If you need to set yourself a goal or if you need to be prodded along, go and get yourself an Activity Monitor , this way, depending on the type you get, it can remind you when you’ve been staying put a little too long. To get moving, especially before and after those holiday meals. Strive for balance. You’ll feel better, more relaxed, and it’s less likely that that irritating cousin of yours will get under your skin and raise your blood pressure as usual. Remember, a balanced life is a happier life – and one where blood pressure stays within manageable limits.

Most importantly of all – stop worrying so much. Worrying never solved anything and simply put, it’s bad for your health. Worrying raises stress levels and blood pressure. So if you can’t find that special present that Johnny had his heart set on, don’t stress it, usually anything you give him will be appreciated, especially if along with the gift, you add some personal time along with it!

So the most important holiday message we have for you is – try not to get too stressed. Stress is the silent killer, not high blood pressure. High blood pressure is a symptom.

Now, we take having high blood pressure seriously and if you suffer from high blood pressure you should be seeing your physician regularly. And we think it’s safe to say he/she (your physician) probably suggests that you take your blood pressure regularly so that you are aware of how you’re doing.

At HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com we are fortunate to carry some of the most accurate blood pressure monitors on the market. From automatic pressure monitors that self-inflate, to ones that allow you to take your pressure on your wrist. If you want some peace of mind, then click on this link, and check out the various types of blood pressure monitors that we have available.

So from all of us here at HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com, have a healthy, stress-less holiday season.

 

Read more

So we are right in the midst of all the holiday clamor as we all hurry along, shopping for that special gift for the people we care about. From going to pick out that special tree, whether it’s at a tree farm, a local lot or maybe you’re picking your first artificial tree, there is soooo much to do to get ready for this special time of year.

You may be wishing you can spend some down time this time of year with family and friends but in reality, the stress of making your Christmas season, one that is reminiscent of a Norman Rockwell picture, and can very well impact your health, and not too many people pay attention to the warning signs!

The fact is that a lot of pressure comes with the holidays. And so health concerns can  sky-rocket for a lot of people at this time of year. High blood pressure and Christmas do NOT have to go hand in hand.

Could Christmas be bad for your health? Well, it doesn’t have to be.

You may have heard the term, “The silent killer” well, while most people think that it is referring to your blood pressure, the true motivator is “Stress”. Which if you let it, can elevate your pressure to such a state that you can indeed become ill.

The three big causes of high blood pressure and poor health, in general, are poor diet, lack of exercise and stress, tension or anxiety. All three of these factors can grow proportionately during the holiday season. We often find ourselves sitting around the dinner table gorging ourselves on various mixtures of sugar and grease, too stuffed to move and getting annoyed with our relatives.

OK, that’s the worst case scenario, and thankfully it’s never usually that bad. But if we approach the holidays with a bit of forethought we can avoid the holiday snares and still have a good time.

If we keep things in perspective and think things through, the holiday period we can even make Christmas good for your blood pressure.

So what to do? Just try to strike a balance.

Now we know you have all heard the phrase, “Everything in Moderation” Well, that’s because there is a reason for it. Go ahead, enjoy Christmas dinner and the festive parties that happen this time of year, but don’t stuff yourself. Use that "Common Sense" we are all supposed to have. You know that anything in excess is not good for you so keep a reign on your portion sizes and make it a point to engage your friends and distant relatives in some conversations.  This is a great way to keep you from going back for seconds or even thirds at the deseart table.

Make sure you get some exercise on a regular basis this time of year. If you need to set yourself a goal or if you need to be prodded along, go and get yourself an Activity Monitor , this way, depending on the type you get, it can remind you when you’ve been staying put a little too long. To get moving, especially before and after those holiday meals. Strive for balance. You’ll feel better, more relaxed, and it’s less likely that that irritating cousin of yours will get under your skin and raise your blood pressure as usual. Remember, a balanced life is a happier life – and one where blood pressure stays within manageable limits.

Most importantly of all – stop worrying so much. Worrying never solved anything and simply put, it’s bad for your health. Worrying raises stress levels and blood pressure. So if you can’t find that special present that Johnny had his heart set on, don’t stress it, usually anything you give him will be appreciated, especially if along with the gift, you add some personal time along with it!

So the most important holiday message we have for you is – try not to get too stressed. Stress is the silent killer, not high blood pressure. High blood pressure is a symptom.

Now, we take having high blood pressure seriously and if you suffer from high blood pressure you should be seeing your physician regularly. And we think it’s safe to say he/she (your physician) probably suggests that you take your blood pressure regularly so that you are aware of how you’re doing.

At HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com we are fortunate to carry some of the most accurate blood pressure monitors on the market. From automatic pressure monitors that self-inflate, to ones that allow you to take your pressure on your wrist. If you want some peace of mind, then click on this link, and check out the various types of blood pressure monitors that we have available.

So from all of us here at HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com, have a healthy, stress-less holiday season.

 

Read more