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Father’s Day 2016- Just Around The Corner!! Please NOT Another Tie!!

Ok, Father’s Day will be here before you know it. What’s your ideas for getting your dad this year? Are you going to opt in for the same old tired tie routine?? That might have worked when you were 9 or 10 years of age, but not now. Think about it. Why not get your father a gift that will help him to be around for the next 20-30 yrs. This way Dad can be a part of all those special moments in your life still to come.

Now, this isn't as dull a present as it might sound. We're not talking about a home defibrillator, or a year's supply of cholesterol-lowering statins, or a subscription to the Sprout of the Month Club. A healthy gift doesn't have to be something that produces a feeble smile from your dad -- and a frantic hope that you'll give him the receipt so he can return it the next day. Plenty of Father's Day gifts can be fun but also encourage a healthy lifestyle. Here are a few ideas.

Fitness Gifts
Obviously, getting some physical activity is good for people of any age, so use your Father's Day gift to encourage your dad to get moving. Even if he's fallen out of the habit of exercising regularly, a new piece of equipment might be just the thing to inspire your father to start up again.

Think about getting him back onto the tennis court with a new racket or onto the golf course with a new set of clubs. Something as simple as a new basketball hoop in the driveway might make him almost as happy now as it did when he was 10! Why not help him stay motivated with an activity tracker like Fitbit Alta It can let him know at a glance how’s he’s doing activity wise and help him stay motivated to keep himself moving and being physical so he can stay mobile and flexible for many years to come.

But what if your dad isn't quite the sporty type and you still want to encourage him to get some exercise?

Think about giving your dad a few sessions at the gym with a personal trainer. A trainer might help your father learn about the benefits of fitness, and perhaps help him figure out a kind of exercise that he'll enjoy. Or if your dad is more of a homebody and reluctant to trek to the fitness club -- and you've got some family members willing to chip in -- think about fitting up his basement with some new equipment, like a stationary bike or treadmill.  And to help you help him, why not have that Fitbit Alta tied into the gift as an additional Father's Day present. This way he can be reminded all the time to keep fit, and stay fit.  You and the rest of the family may want to challenge him to keep the motivation going. Ask him once a week in the beginning on how he is doing against his set goal, if your close enough to him-(distance wise) stop in and work out with him and if your too far away, a phone call, Skype or email checkup on his progress will help to keep his interests in staying fit at the fore-front of his weekly tasks!

An adjustable workout bench can also be a great Father's Day gift, and they are not only for younger guys keen on going shirtless at the beach. Strength training helps people stay healthy, especially as they get older. It allows seniors to stay more mobile and independent, and their increased agility reduces the risk of dangerous falls.

Then at the other end of the spectrum, we have new dads, who often find that the demands of fatherhood derail their longstanding exercise regimen. So think about some gifts that might allow a new father to exercise with his kids. While toddlers are pretty hopeless as running, walking or jogging partners, they may not mind being passengers. So a jogging stroller is a great way for young fathers or Grandfathers for that matter, to get back into shape while keeping an eye on their offspring. 

Outdoor Cooking
A lot of guys are seasonal cooks. While they don't have much interest in the oven and the stove, they love making dinner as soon as they can lug the grill out of the garage. Think about making your dad happy with some barbecuing accessories as a Father's Day gift. But get your dad to think of his grill as something more than an assembly line for hot-dogs, hamburgers, and other foods with dubious health benefits.  At HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com we have the perfect gift so that your Dad will always have their grilling sensations ready and perfectly cooked.  Check out the wireless-talking barbecue thermometer from Oregon 

Along that same track, think about getting your dad a vegetable tray or assortment of fruits and seafood. These can be placed right on the grill along with other foods of his choosing. Or think about getting a special spatula designed to flip fish fillets often called a fish turner. Another option would be a nice set of skewers for shrimp and vegetable kebabs. 

Many fathers seem to have an ingrained inability to take it easy. They just can't take a break. But as any doctor will tell you, relaxation up to a point, is important, both for your physical and mental health. So think about a Father's Day gift that will force your dad to have some fun and take some time off. A gift certificate for a massage is a good way to get someone to recuperate physically, but some dads may be a little resistant to using such a gift, so offer to go along with him and make it a time for you both, and maybe afterwards make time for a healthy lite dinner get caught up with what is going on in both of your lives.. This could turn out to be one of those memories that mean a lot to both of you!

If your dad's the type who never wants to take a vacation, force the issue. Give him a weekend away with his spouse or a buddy and make him do it. Or you could actually pick your dad up during his lunch break at work and drive off for an afternoon of fishing or hiking -- having cleared the idea with your dad's boss beforehand of course!!

Gadgets, and Odds and Ends
If your dad's already a weekend athlete, than maybe getting him an activity watch or better yet one with a heart rate monitor to help him monitor his daily progress and stats. Or maybe your dads a golfer, well giving him a gift that will help him analyze his swing so he can improve his distance might put a smile on his face. Check out this link from HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com and you can select for a variety of gifts that are sure to put a smile on your dad’s face,….. We guarantee you’re going to see a bigger smile than if he received a tie or aftershave!!! Click here to select that perfect gift for Dad.
http://www.heartratemonitorsusa.com/collections/the-most-wished-for-fathers-day-gift

Spending Time Together is always a great option. Think outside of the usual Father's Day mind-set. You don't have to follow the herd of early June shoppers to the mall. Instead, spending some time with your dad could be the best and healthiest gift you could give.

Try picking out a gift that you both can have some quality time in doing together, rather than a gift that's just for him. It strengthens the connection between a father and his child, which is what Father's Day is supposed to be about."

"Buy him a ticket to a special event, like a baseball game or maybe one of his favorite music groups, but make sure you take care of the details. He shouldn't have to drive, park, or figure anything out, and he won’t if you’re in the driver seat, taking care of all potential issues.

So keep the above in mind and think outside the box a little and again, if your having an issue in finding that perfect Father's Day give, check out the Father’s Day gift ideas from HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com  just click on this link below:

The Great Father’s Day Gift Ideas.

To All the Father's and Grand Father's out there Happy Father's Day from HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com !!

 

 

 

 

Read more

Ok, Father’s Day will be here before you know it. What’s your ideas for getting your dad this year? Are you going to opt in for the same old tired tie routine?? That might have worked when you were 9 or 10 years of age, but not now. Think about it. Why not get your father a gift that will help him to be around for the next 20-30 yrs. This way Dad can be a part of all those special moments in your life still to come.

Now, this isn't as dull a present as it might sound. We're not talking about a home defibrillator, or a year's supply of cholesterol-lowering statins, or a subscription to the Sprout of the Month Club. A healthy gift doesn't have to be something that produces a feeble smile from your dad -- and a frantic hope that you'll give him the receipt so he can return it the next day. Plenty of Father's Day gifts can be fun but also encourage a healthy lifestyle. Here are a few ideas.

Fitness Gifts
Obviously, getting some physical activity is good for people of any age, so use your Father's Day gift to encourage your dad to get moving. Even if he's fallen out of the habit of exercising regularly, a new piece of equipment might be just the thing to inspire your father to start up again.

Think about getting him back onto the tennis court with a new racket or onto the golf course with a new set of clubs. Something as simple as a new basketball hoop in the driveway might make him almost as happy now as it did when he was 10! Why not help him stay motivated with an activity tracker like Fitbit Alta It can let him know at a glance how’s he’s doing activity wise and help him stay motivated to keep himself moving and being physical so he can stay mobile and flexible for many years to come.

But what if your dad isn't quite the sporty type and you still want to encourage him to get some exercise?

Think about giving your dad a few sessions at the gym with a personal trainer. A trainer might help your father learn about the benefits of fitness, and perhaps help him figure out a kind of exercise that he'll enjoy. Or if your dad is more of a homebody and reluctant to trek to the fitness club -- and you've got some family members willing to chip in -- think about fitting up his basement with some new equipment, like a stationary bike or treadmill.  And to help you help him, why not have that Fitbit Alta tied into the gift as an additional Father's Day present. This way he can be reminded all the time to keep fit, and stay fit.  You and the rest of the family may want to challenge him to keep the motivation going. Ask him once a week in the beginning on how he is doing against his set goal, if your close enough to him-(distance wise) stop in and work out with him and if your too far away, a phone call, Skype or email checkup on his progress will help to keep his interests in staying fit at the fore-front of his weekly tasks!

An adjustable workout bench can also be a great Father's Day gift, and they are not only for younger guys keen on going shirtless at the beach. Strength training helps people stay healthy, especially as they get older. It allows seniors to stay more mobile and independent, and their increased agility reduces the risk of dangerous falls.

Then at the other end of the spectrum, we have new dads, who often find that the demands of fatherhood derail their longstanding exercise regimen. So think about some gifts that might allow a new father to exercise with his kids. While toddlers are pretty hopeless as running, walking or jogging partners, they may not mind being passengers. So a jogging stroller is a great way for young fathers or Grandfathers for that matter, to get back into shape while keeping an eye on their offspring. 

Outdoor Cooking
A lot of guys are seasonal cooks. While they don't have much interest in the oven and the stove, they love making dinner as soon as they can lug the grill out of the garage. Think about making your dad happy with some barbecuing accessories as a Father's Day gift. But get your dad to think of his grill as something more than an assembly line for hot-dogs, hamburgers, and other foods with dubious health benefits.  At HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com we have the perfect gift so that your Dad will always have their grilling sensations ready and perfectly cooked.  Check out the wireless-talking barbecue thermometer from Oregon 

Along that same track, think about getting your dad a vegetable tray or assortment of fruits and seafood. These can be placed right on the grill along with other foods of his choosing. Or think about getting a special spatula designed to flip fish fillets often called a fish turner. Another option would be a nice set of skewers for shrimp and vegetable kebabs. 

Many fathers seem to have an ingrained inability to take it easy. They just can't take a break. But as any doctor will tell you, relaxation up to a point, is important, both for your physical and mental health. So think about a Father's Day gift that will force your dad to have some fun and take some time off. A gift certificate for a massage is a good way to get someone to recuperate physically, but some dads may be a little resistant to using such a gift, so offer to go along with him and make it a time for you both, and maybe afterwards make time for a healthy lite dinner get caught up with what is going on in both of your lives.. This could turn out to be one of those memories that mean a lot to both of you!

If your dad's the type who never wants to take a vacation, force the issue. Give him a weekend away with his spouse or a buddy and make him do it. Or you could actually pick your dad up during his lunch break at work and drive off for an afternoon of fishing or hiking -- having cleared the idea with your dad's boss beforehand of course!!

Gadgets, and Odds and Ends
If your dad's already a weekend athlete, than maybe getting him an activity watch or better yet one with a heart rate monitor to help him monitor his daily progress and stats. Or maybe your dads a golfer, well giving him a gift that will help him analyze his swing so he can improve his distance might put a smile on his face. Check out this link from HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com and you can select for a variety of gifts that are sure to put a smile on your dad’s face,….. We guarantee you’re going to see a bigger smile than if he received a tie or aftershave!!! Click here to select that perfect gift for Dad.
http://www.heartratemonitorsusa.com/collections/the-most-wished-for-fathers-day-gift

Spending Time Together is always a great option. Think outside of the usual Father's Day mind-set. You don't have to follow the herd of early June shoppers to the mall. Instead, spending some time with your dad could be the best and healthiest gift you could give.

Try picking out a gift that you both can have some quality time in doing together, rather than a gift that's just for him. It strengthens the connection between a father and his child, which is what Father's Day is supposed to be about."

"Buy him a ticket to a special event, like a baseball game or maybe one of his favorite music groups, but make sure you take care of the details. He shouldn't have to drive, park, or figure anything out, and he won’t if you’re in the driver seat, taking care of all potential issues.

So keep the above in mind and think outside the box a little and again, if your having an issue in finding that perfect Father's Day give, check out the Father’s Day gift ideas from HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com  just click on this link below:

The Great Father’s Day Gift Ideas.

To All the Father's and Grand Father's out there Happy Father's Day from HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com !!

 

 

 

 

Read more

Early Bird Does Get The Worm, Especially With Exercise!! OR Morning Workout Tips That Are Actually Helpful

We know not everyone is a morning person. (And even fewer of us are eager to wake up and hit the gym.) But getting up and moving can actually be an amazing way to start your day. Keep this in mind, studies have shown that people that get up early and start moving actually tend to be more optimistic, stress less and are more proactive about the upcoming day or the week’s events.

While the best time to exercise depends on your schedule and your body, the odds are in favor of morning workouts. Think about it: You won’t have to trudge to the gym after a long day of work, you may sleep better, and you’re more likely to actually get it done if you do it before other (sometimes more fun) options come up. After all, who wants to say no to happy hour?

Sure, you may have heard the usual tips and tricks, but what tricks do people who consistently work out in the early a.m. use? We asked those who know best—a mix of people who train for a living, to find out what gets them up and at ‘em at the crack of dawn.

1. Cool down to warm up.
Try riding a Bike to the gym or even to work—even in the winter. Those single-digit temperatures and bitter breeze smack you so hard in the face, you won't even need a cup of coffee

2. Set two alarms.
“The first one lets you know you have 15 more minutes to sleep, which makes feel better about the start to your day. Then try meditating for 10 minutes, drink an almond milk cappuccino, play music (pretty loud—sorry, neighbors!), and throw on a super-bright exercise outfit. Caffeine. Clear Head. Neon. You can be out the door on your exercise mission and ready to take on the day

3. Pack accordingly and get in bed early.
Try every evening to check to see what the morning weather will be and prepare your gear bag accordingly (not every day is a jump rope day). On weekdays try to be in bed no later than 10:30 p.m., so your 6:30 a.m. alarm doesn’t feel quite so brutal.  Once your routine is established you can be ready and out the door within 10 minutes. You may have to adjust both your bedtime and your morning alarm settings depending on how early you need to get up so you can get your exercise in and be ready to punch that clock!!!

4. Flip a switch.
Blinding light as soon as the alarm goes off acts as a good motivator to get you up. You realize once that light hits you, the adrenalin starts to pump and you then don’t want to go back to sleep. Then try turning on some tunes—on days you may need extra help try setting your I-Tunes to the heavy metal shuffle then grab your first cup of coffee or high-protein shake of your choice, rather than the covers

5. Have a delicious breakfast ready and waiting.
If you set your alarm for a 5 a.m. wake up call, try preparing your protein packed smoothie the night before and have it ready and waiting in the fridge for you. Remember to pack that smoothie with fiber and protein so you can get the energy your body needs, while keeping you feeling full and satisfied!!

6. Keep the alarm away from your bed.
Ok, for some people, they need to really just get out of bed to start their day, so try putting your alarm clock on your dresser away from your bed instead of the night stand. This way, you will need to get out from under the covers in order to turn off that un-forgiving alarm… It also helps if the alarm is both louder and annoying, the louder the better to get you up and moving!!

7. Make it a habit.
Life is about habits, both big and small. So to get to the bigger goal of working out in the morning, try to stick to small habits along the way, like placing your alarm clock in your kitchen, so you need to get out of that bed in order to shut it off. As you brush your teeth, ask yourself: What will I gain from staying awake instead of going back to bed? The answer is "A Lot!" because a couple extra hours of uninterrupted time is enormous, whether it's spent at a desk or in the gym. After 2-3 weeks of embracing moving around early in the morning, you will find you will no longer need tricks to get you up and moving.

8. Prep your clothes—and a playlist.
If you’re like most people you like to look good. The more you like your outfit, the more excited you will be to put it on! Also, always have an excellent playlist. Studies have shown that music dictates the way and the intensity in which most people move. So try keeping those up-beat tunes handy to set the pace for your early morning routines!

9. Wear red and grab a mint.
We all need a little help in getting us up and moving, whether it’s an early morning exercise start of the day or beginning that much thought about motivating run. Try changing up the colors of your workout clothes. Like making a statement, then try the color “Red”. This color’s known to increase excitement, energy levels, and circulation, and for help in getting a person moving. Try popping in a peppermint candy like an Altoids to get you really woken up. Peppermint can create alertness, which is something you need running through Central Park in the early a.m.

10. Coffee = life.
My go to morning drink is coffee, strong and hot. I drink as much coffee as I can. A good strong coffee can be just the ticket to help you negotiate your way around your neighborhood on your early morning excursions.

11. Splash yourself.
If you’re like me, I could lie in bed for hours, so the biggest struggle for me is just putting my feet on the ground. Then I immediately walk to the bathroom and wash my face with cold water—afterward, I feel awake and ready to go. If you have a hard time staying out of bed and want to climb back in under the covers, try the cold water splash treatment….Great way to make that transition from sleepy to bright eyed and bushy tailed.

12. Eliminate excuses.
Get everything ready the night before you get up so you’re not wasting any time in packing your exercise gear, change of clothes and personal items. The last thing you want to do is make your early morning start an exercise in tedious morning prep work!

13. Schedule brunch.
Most of us are completely motivated by rewards, preferably food. So plan brunch/early lunch with your friends on the weekends in the late morning. Nothing makes you want to run harder or faster (and even sometimes longer) than knowing some French toast is waiting for you.

14. Think about how you'll feel afterward.
Know it’s knowing how great you will feel once it’s over. Once you’re done, you will realize you have the entire day and night to do whatever you want, or need to do!

15. Treat Yourself!
There is nothing like having a delicious (and healthy) pre-gym snack so part of your motivation can be to wake up and make yourself an energy loaded tasty morsel made with almond butter and oats, having a strong cup of coffee on the way to your gym is just the ticket to getting you moving. By the time you get there, you will find you have tons of energy and are ready for action.

16. Turn to your furry friends.
If you’ve got pets, try getting into the habit of taking them with you on your morning run. You will find that the company they provide will actually help you to commit to a run/walk each day and remember, having them with you not only helps you to improve your health but your helping to help them maintain a healthy lifestyle as well

17. Look into the future.
Try to visualize the workout the night before as you’re falling asleep. Visualizing yourself enjoying it and seeing yourself smiling works every time. You see your already setting expectations that your mind accepts as being real and thus your body accepts the fact that getting up and getting moving early in the day is a happy and rewarding task that is worth getting up for!

18. Respect your routine.
Give your workout the same respect as your child’s doctor appointment or your work schedule. Scheduling your workouts can help keep you going. If it’s scheduled, you will have an easier time maintaining your schedule instead of just trying to work in a time to get your exercise in. This way there is no reason to let anything get in your way of having a morning exercise happen.

19. Warm up the room.
Try laying out your clothes the night before, and if you have a programmable thermostat, schedule the heat to turn on early so getting out of bed isn’t so hard, or cold

20. Have a group you can't let down.
If you have a hard time just getting yourself to maintain your new found morning schedule, then find a group of like-minded individuals looking to start their day with an invigorating workout. While you may not always want to go through with your workout, seeing your friends may be just the motivator you’re looking for to get you up and out of the house. Also, you don’t want to be the one they’ll end up talking about because you were a no-show!

21. Chores count.
Sometimes, just sometimes your early morning stint of exercise may need to be postponed because of the weather. If you live in the snow belt, your morning workout may be switched to a few hours of shoveling snow and if you’re up in New England, Main and Vermont, your early morning routines may be focused around getting the firewood or filling the coal bucket. No way around that. No matter what your doing, exercise is exercise and in the spring, you can swap your boots for running shoes again .

22. Sleep in your Workout Clothes
If your looking to get as much shut-eye as you can in the morning and still hit the ground running at an early time, try sleeping in your morning workout clothes. They're comfortable, fit you well, and this way when you roll out of bed your already dressed to tackle your morning routine. Naturally, it will help if your clothes are clean and fresh before you put them on for your good nights sleep!

23. Use a wake up light. Try this little trick of using a wake up light, so when the alarm goes off, it’s bright in your room and you’re not tempted to lay back down and snooze. Also have everything packed and ready to go the night before so all you have to do is roll out of bed and go

24. Do it no matter what.
Remember, its consistency. Even if you’re not feeling the workout that day, if you just get yourself up and go through the motions, it helps, and there is always the motivator of keeping a picture of a new outfit or a smaller size pair of pants that you are working to try and get into.

Since your adopting a lifestyle focused around your morning. You can also add a second level of backup to help you in getting up in the morning. Try using a Fitbit Charge HR Activity Tracker. This little device will not only track your  activity during the day while it monitors your heart rate, (without the need of a strap) but you can also set an alarm to help you start your day.  Its been proven that setting a goal can help you maintain your fitness programs. What better motivation can you get then an activity monitor that sends you notice of how well your doing. Check out how the Fitbit Charge can be your biggest cheerleader!!


I hope these tips and tricks will “Do the Trick” in helping you to start your days motivated and ready to give it your all!!!

 

 

 

Read more

We know not everyone is a morning person. (And even fewer of us are eager to wake up and hit the gym.) But getting up and moving can actually be an amazing way to start your day. Keep this in mind, studies have shown that people that get up early and start moving actually tend to be more optimistic, stress less and are more proactive about the upcoming day or the week’s events.

While the best time to exercise depends on your schedule and your body, the odds are in favor of morning workouts. Think about it: You won’t have to trudge to the gym after a long day of work, you may sleep better, and you’re more likely to actually get it done if you do it before other (sometimes more fun) options come up. After all, who wants to say no to happy hour?

Sure, you may have heard the usual tips and tricks, but what tricks do people who consistently work out in the early a.m. use? We asked those who know best—a mix of people who train for a living, to find out what gets them up and at ‘em at the crack of dawn.

1. Cool down to warm up.
Try riding a Bike to the gym or even to work—even in the winter. Those single-digit temperatures and bitter breeze smack you so hard in the face, you won't even need a cup of coffee

2. Set two alarms.
“The first one lets you know you have 15 more minutes to sleep, which makes feel better about the start to your day. Then try meditating for 10 minutes, drink an almond milk cappuccino, play music (pretty loud—sorry, neighbors!), and throw on a super-bright exercise outfit. Caffeine. Clear Head. Neon. You can be out the door on your exercise mission and ready to take on the day

3. Pack accordingly and get in bed early.
Try every evening to check to see what the morning weather will be and prepare your gear bag accordingly (not every day is a jump rope day). On weekdays try to be in bed no later than 10:30 p.m., so your 6:30 a.m. alarm doesn’t feel quite so brutal.  Once your routine is established you can be ready and out the door within 10 minutes. You may have to adjust both your bedtime and your morning alarm settings depending on how early you need to get up so you can get your exercise in and be ready to punch that clock!!!

4. Flip a switch.
Blinding light as soon as the alarm goes off acts as a good motivator to get you up. You realize once that light hits you, the adrenalin starts to pump and you then don’t want to go back to sleep. Then try turning on some tunes—on days you may need extra help try setting your I-Tunes to the heavy metal shuffle then grab your first cup of coffee or high-protein shake of your choice, rather than the covers

5. Have a delicious breakfast ready and waiting.
If you set your alarm for a 5 a.m. wake up call, try preparing your protein packed smoothie the night before and have it ready and waiting in the fridge for you. Remember to pack that smoothie with fiber and protein so you can get the energy your body needs, while keeping you feeling full and satisfied!!

6. Keep the alarm away from your bed.
Ok, for some people, they need to really just get out of bed to start their day, so try putting your alarm clock on your dresser away from your bed instead of the night stand. This way, you will need to get out from under the covers in order to turn off that un-forgiving alarm… It also helps if the alarm is both louder and annoying, the louder the better to get you up and moving!!

7. Make it a habit.
Life is about habits, both big and small. So to get to the bigger goal of working out in the morning, try to stick to small habits along the way, like placing your alarm clock in your kitchen, so you need to get out of that bed in order to shut it off. As you brush your teeth, ask yourself: What will I gain from staying awake instead of going back to bed? The answer is "A Lot!" because a couple extra hours of uninterrupted time is enormous, whether it's spent at a desk or in the gym. After 2-3 weeks of embracing moving around early in the morning, you will find you will no longer need tricks to get you up and moving.

8. Prep your clothes—and a playlist.
If you’re like most people you like to look good. The more you like your outfit, the more excited you will be to put it on! Also, always have an excellent playlist. Studies have shown that music dictates the way and the intensity in which most people move. So try keeping those up-beat tunes handy to set the pace for your early morning routines!

9. Wear red and grab a mint.
We all need a little help in getting us up and moving, whether it’s an early morning exercise start of the day or beginning that much thought about motivating run. Try changing up the colors of your workout clothes. Like making a statement, then try the color “Red”. This color’s known to increase excitement, energy levels, and circulation, and for help in getting a person moving. Try popping in a peppermint candy like an Altoids to get you really woken up. Peppermint can create alertness, which is something you need running through Central Park in the early a.m.

10. Coffee = life.
My go to morning drink is coffee, strong and hot. I drink as much coffee as I can. A good strong coffee can be just the ticket to help you negotiate your way around your neighborhood on your early morning excursions.

11. Splash yourself.
If you’re like me, I could lie in bed for hours, so the biggest struggle for me is just putting my feet on the ground. Then I immediately walk to the bathroom and wash my face with cold water—afterward, I feel awake and ready to go. If you have a hard time staying out of bed and want to climb back in under the covers, try the cold water splash treatment….Great way to make that transition from sleepy to bright eyed and bushy tailed.

12. Eliminate excuses.
Get everything ready the night before you get up so you’re not wasting any time in packing your exercise gear, change of clothes and personal items. The last thing you want to do is make your early morning start an exercise in tedious morning prep work!

13. Schedule brunch.
Most of us are completely motivated by rewards, preferably food. So plan brunch/early lunch with your friends on the weekends in the late morning. Nothing makes you want to run harder or faster (and even sometimes longer) than knowing some French toast is waiting for you.

14. Think about how you'll feel afterward.
Know it’s knowing how great you will feel once it’s over. Once you’re done, you will realize you have the entire day and night to do whatever you want, or need to do!

15. Treat Yourself!
There is nothing like having a delicious (and healthy) pre-gym snack so part of your motivation can be to wake up and make yourself an energy loaded tasty morsel made with almond butter and oats, having a strong cup of coffee on the way to your gym is just the ticket to getting you moving. By the time you get there, you will find you have tons of energy and are ready for action.

16. Turn to your furry friends.
If you’ve got pets, try getting into the habit of taking them with you on your morning run. You will find that the company they provide will actually help you to commit to a run/walk each day and remember, having them with you not only helps you to improve your health but your helping to help them maintain a healthy lifestyle as well

17. Look into the future.
Try to visualize the workout the night before as you’re falling asleep. Visualizing yourself enjoying it and seeing yourself smiling works every time. You see your already setting expectations that your mind accepts as being real and thus your body accepts the fact that getting up and getting moving early in the day is a happy and rewarding task that is worth getting up for!

18. Respect your routine.
Give your workout the same respect as your child’s doctor appointment or your work schedule. Scheduling your workouts can help keep you going. If it’s scheduled, you will have an easier time maintaining your schedule instead of just trying to work in a time to get your exercise in. This way there is no reason to let anything get in your way of having a morning exercise happen.

19. Warm up the room.
Try laying out your clothes the night before, and if you have a programmable thermostat, schedule the heat to turn on early so getting out of bed isn’t so hard, or cold

20. Have a group you can't let down.
If you have a hard time just getting yourself to maintain your new found morning schedule, then find a group of like-minded individuals looking to start their day with an invigorating workout. While you may not always want to go through with your workout, seeing your friends may be just the motivator you’re looking for to get you up and out of the house. Also, you don’t want to be the one they’ll end up talking about because you were a no-show!

21. Chores count.
Sometimes, just sometimes your early morning stint of exercise may need to be postponed because of the weather. If you live in the snow belt, your morning workout may be switched to a few hours of shoveling snow and if you’re up in New England, Main and Vermont, your early morning routines may be focused around getting the firewood or filling the coal bucket. No way around that. No matter what your doing, exercise is exercise and in the spring, you can swap your boots for running shoes again .

22. Sleep in your Workout Clothes
If your looking to get as much shut-eye as you can in the morning and still hit the ground running at an early time, try sleeping in your morning workout clothes. They're comfortable, fit you well, and this way when you roll out of bed your already dressed to tackle your morning routine. Naturally, it will help if your clothes are clean and fresh before you put them on for your good nights sleep!

23. Use a wake up light. Try this little trick of using a wake up light, so when the alarm goes off, it’s bright in your room and you’re not tempted to lay back down and snooze. Also have everything packed and ready to go the night before so all you have to do is roll out of bed and go

24. Do it no matter what.
Remember, its consistency. Even if you’re not feeling the workout that day, if you just get yourself up and go through the motions, it helps, and there is always the motivator of keeping a picture of a new outfit or a smaller size pair of pants that you are working to try and get into.

Since your adopting a lifestyle focused around your morning. You can also add a second level of backup to help you in getting up in the morning. Try using a Fitbit Charge HR Activity Tracker. This little device will not only track your  activity during the day while it monitors your heart rate, (without the need of a strap) but you can also set an alarm to help you start your day.  Its been proven that setting a goal can help you maintain your fitness programs. What better motivation can you get then an activity monitor that sends you notice of how well your doing. Check out how the Fitbit Charge can be your biggest cheerleader!!


I hope these tips and tricks will “Do the Trick” in helping you to start your days motivated and ready to give it your all!!!

 

 

 

Read more

Just How Do I start to Run ???

Ok, it's officially the last weekend of Spring and Memorial Day weekend is now over! This weekend kicked off the beginning of  Summer! You've thought about adopting running into your healthier New You, maybe to look a little leaner and trim for the bathing suit weather??  But just how do you go about it??  

You're now committed to getting yourself in shape and want to try your hands (or should I say feet) in taking up running to help you get fit and stay fit. Maybe besides getting fit, you’re thinking it might be possible to take part in a 5k, 10k. Maybe even a half marathon once you’ve broken into your stride. Then who knows, you might get yourself to the point of tackling your dream of a full marathon. Well here are a few starting points to get you from just jogging around the block to tackling those distance hills that are out there on the horizon.

The first thing you want to do is when starting any type of physical activity, especially if you haven’t been very physical lately is to go and get yourself checked out by your physician. This way you know what you have to work with.

Next, you need to plan on working your running into your daily schedule. Some people are ‘Morning People” and have no problem getting up early to start their day. Others never seem to want to leave their beds so scheduling your run-workout would be best for them if they penciled in a late afternoon/early evening run. Again this needs to be a time that you can commit to and once adopted, needs to be stayed with.

You will want to start out with a 20 minute run, for best results at least 3 times per week. Again, this is all part of your schedule commitments. So be aware that things do sometimes crop up, especially if you select to schedule a later afternoon or early evening run. That is why I like the morning runs since it is the beginning of your day and that time is usually yours to do with what you will as long as you get up early enough to accomplish it.

When you start running, don't plan to go too far or too fast right away — doing so is the number-one cause of injury among runners. Start by running for 20 minutes at a time, three times per week. Gradually increase the amount of time you're running and the number of days you run, but do not increase either until you feel comfortable completing your current level of training. If 20 minutes is too much, don't be afraid to take walking breaks. Perhaps begin by running for 4 minutes and walking for 1 minute, until you complete the 20 minutes. As you get stronger, begin eliminating the walk breaks.

When you're a beginner, it's not necessary to worry about how many miles you are running. Focus on the number of minutes instead. Gradually you'll begin to cover more ground in the same amount of time, and that's when you'll want to increase the duration of your workout.

What equipment do I need?
One advantage of the sport of running is that so little gear is required. But the most important investment runners should make is in a good pair of running shoes — not cross-training, walking, or tennis shoes. Running shoes are best purchased at specialty running stores, where employees can recommend models based on your ability and goals. Many will also watch you run, to make sure the shoes you buy complement the way your foot strikes the ground.

You should also have good quality workout clothes, preferably made of wicking material to keep you cooler and drier. A digital sports watch is also helpful, an Activity Monitor is even better as it can track your distance and the calories your burning as well. A good example of an Activity Monitor is the Fitbit Charge. As you advance in your running and set new goals, a heart-rate monitor, like the new Fitbit Blaze can do it all for you, offers the same features as an Activity Monitor but also keeps track of your heart rate as you go and progress. This way you can make sure you keep your effort levels where they need to be.

How sore should I expect to get?
Your legs will be sore in the beginning, but if you keep up the routine, the leg soreness will subside relatively quickly. If you feel acute pain anywhere, stop running for a few days and let your legs recover, to prevent injuries. Shin splints are the most common injury, usually incurred when you overdo your training or wear improper shoes. Be aware of the difference between being tired and being injured, and make sure you're not encouraging overuse injuries.

How-To Train?
How fast should I be going? Should I be out of breath from the beginning?
Running will certainly feel challenging at first and you will be slightly out of breath when you start. That should also eventually subside. It's helpful to use the "talk test." If you can hold a conversation while you're running, you're at a good pace. Once or twice a week, however, go for a shorter run, but complete it at a higher speed so that talking is more difficult. It will help increase your fitness level and cardiovascular strength.

Should I run on the treadmill or outside?
Both have advantages. Treadmills are a perfect alternative when the weather is uncooperative and can be helpful in easing into new distances or paces. Adam Krajchir, head coach and program director for the New York Road Runners Foundation Team for Kids, believes that treadmills complement outside running because the cushioned surface reduces the risk of injuries that many runners get from constantly pounding their legs on the pavement outside.

"Run, wherever you can, inside or out," he says. "Getting into a regular routine is more important than finding a perfect solution."

Should I avoid hills? How should I change my form if I come to a hill?
Running hills is a great way to improve leg strength and burn calories. When you run up a hill, shorten your stride and pump your arms forward. Going down a hill, let gravity do the work and give it a little help by leaning 1slightly forward.

What are side stitches and how to I get rid of them?
Side stitches are common and are caused by a lack of oxygen in your GI muscles. To stop them, Krajchir recommends exhaling hard and long or bending over at the waist while exhaling. You can also slow down your pace until the stitch subsides.

If side stitches become a recurring problem, Krajchir suggests avoiding solid food immediately before a workout and making sure you're always well hydrated.

Food, Weight, Racing
What should I eat?
Running burns a lot of calories — an average of 100 calories per mile — but it is not a license to eat whatever you want. You don't need to change your diet unless you're training for an endurance event like a marathon. But it's important to not restrict carbohydrates. Get plenty of protein to rebuild muscles, and eat sensible, healthy, high-energy foods (plenty of fruit, vegetables, and whole grains).

Will I lose weight?
If it is your goal to lose weight, running is an excellent way of doing so. As with any exercise program, if you expend more calories than you intake, then you will lose weight.

"My best advice is, if you want to regulate your weight, learn to regulate your diet first and let your running regulate your toning."

Setting a goal to run a 5K (3.1 miles) race or any other distance is an excellent way to stay motivated and true to your running routine. Local races attract people of all abilities and provide a supportive and encouraging environment to complete a goal. Many people walk the entire race, while others will sprint from the beginning. If you'd rather wait until you're sure you can run the entire distance, sign up for one that is three or four months away, and work toward the goal.

The above tips and recommendations will put you on the right track to beginning a running regimen. In the long run, its all really up to you. Keep at it, mix up your runs and add some tweaks to change up your running patterns and you will soon find yourself over reaching your pre-determined distance goals. The best thing about setting a goal, is that after you have achieved it, and you spend a little time congratulating yourself on your accomplishment,,,,, YOU can always set a newer, higher goal…….Most of all,,,, Have FUN!!!


Read more

Ok, it's officially the last weekend of Spring and Memorial Day weekend is now over! This weekend kicked off the beginning of  Summer! You've thought about adopting running into your healthier New You, maybe to look a little leaner and trim for the bathing suit weather??  But just how do you go about it??  

You're now committed to getting yourself in shape and want to try your hands (or should I say feet) in taking up running to help you get fit and stay fit. Maybe besides getting fit, you’re thinking it might be possible to take part in a 5k, 10k. Maybe even a half marathon once you’ve broken into your stride. Then who knows, you might get yourself to the point of tackling your dream of a full marathon. Well here are a few starting points to get you from just jogging around the block to tackling those distance hills that are out there on the horizon.

The first thing you want to do is when starting any type of physical activity, especially if you haven’t been very physical lately is to go and get yourself checked out by your physician. This way you know what you have to work with.

Next, you need to plan on working your running into your daily schedule. Some people are ‘Morning People” and have no problem getting up early to start their day. Others never seem to want to leave their beds so scheduling your run-workout would be best for them if they penciled in a late afternoon/early evening run. Again this needs to be a time that you can commit to and once adopted, needs to be stayed with.

You will want to start out with a 20 minute run, for best results at least 3 times per week. Again, this is all part of your schedule commitments. So be aware that things do sometimes crop up, especially if you select to schedule a later afternoon or early evening run. That is why I like the morning runs since it is the beginning of your day and that time is usually yours to do with what you will as long as you get up early enough to accomplish it.

When you start running, don't plan to go too far or too fast right away — doing so is the number-one cause of injury among runners. Start by running for 20 minutes at a time, three times per week. Gradually increase the amount of time you're running and the number of days you run, but do not increase either until you feel comfortable completing your current level of training. If 20 minutes is too much, don't be afraid to take walking breaks. Perhaps begin by running for 4 minutes and walking for 1 minute, until you complete the 20 minutes. As you get stronger, begin eliminating the walk breaks.

When you're a beginner, it's not necessary to worry about how many miles you are running. Focus on the number of minutes instead. Gradually you'll begin to cover more ground in the same amount of time, and that's when you'll want to increase the duration of your workout.

What equipment do I need?
One advantage of the sport of running is that so little gear is required. But the most important investment runners should make is in a good pair of running shoes — not cross-training, walking, or tennis shoes. Running shoes are best purchased at specialty running stores, where employees can recommend models based on your ability and goals. Many will also watch you run, to make sure the shoes you buy complement the way your foot strikes the ground.

You should also have good quality workout clothes, preferably made of wicking material to keep you cooler and drier. A digital sports watch is also helpful, an Activity Monitor is even better as it can track your distance and the calories your burning as well. A good example of an Activity Monitor is the Fitbit Charge. As you advance in your running and set new goals, a heart-rate monitor, like the new Fitbit Blaze can do it all for you, offers the same features as an Activity Monitor but also keeps track of your heart rate as you go and progress. This way you can make sure you keep your effort levels where they need to be.

How sore should I expect to get?
Your legs will be sore in the beginning, but if you keep up the routine, the leg soreness will subside relatively quickly. If you feel acute pain anywhere, stop running for a few days and let your legs recover, to prevent injuries. Shin splints are the most common injury, usually incurred when you overdo your training or wear improper shoes. Be aware of the difference between being tired and being injured, and make sure you're not encouraging overuse injuries.

How-To Train?
How fast should I be going? Should I be out of breath from the beginning?
Running will certainly feel challenging at first and you will be slightly out of breath when you start. That should also eventually subside. It's helpful to use the "talk test." If you can hold a conversation while you're running, you're at a good pace. Once or twice a week, however, go for a shorter run, but complete it at a higher speed so that talking is more difficult. It will help increase your fitness level and cardiovascular strength.

Should I run on the treadmill or outside?
Both have advantages. Treadmills are a perfect alternative when the weather is uncooperative and can be helpful in easing into new distances or paces. Adam Krajchir, head coach and program director for the New York Road Runners Foundation Team for Kids, believes that treadmills complement outside running because the cushioned surface reduces the risk of injuries that many runners get from constantly pounding their legs on the pavement outside.

"Run, wherever you can, inside or out," he says. "Getting into a regular routine is more important than finding a perfect solution."

Should I avoid hills? How should I change my form if I come to a hill?
Running hills is a great way to improve leg strength and burn calories. When you run up a hill, shorten your stride and pump your arms forward. Going down a hill, let gravity do the work and give it a little help by leaning 1slightly forward.

What are side stitches and how to I get rid of them?
Side stitches are common and are caused by a lack of oxygen in your GI muscles. To stop them, Krajchir recommends exhaling hard and long or bending over at the waist while exhaling. You can also slow down your pace until the stitch subsides.

If side stitches become a recurring problem, Krajchir suggests avoiding solid food immediately before a workout and making sure you're always well hydrated.

Food, Weight, Racing
What should I eat?
Running burns a lot of calories — an average of 100 calories per mile — but it is not a license to eat whatever you want. You don't need to change your diet unless you're training for an endurance event like a marathon. But it's important to not restrict carbohydrates. Get plenty of protein to rebuild muscles, and eat sensible, healthy, high-energy foods (plenty of fruit, vegetables, and whole grains).

Will I lose weight?
If it is your goal to lose weight, running is an excellent way of doing so. As with any exercise program, if you expend more calories than you intake, then you will lose weight.

"My best advice is, if you want to regulate your weight, learn to regulate your diet first and let your running regulate your toning."

Setting a goal to run a 5K (3.1 miles) race or any other distance is an excellent way to stay motivated and true to your running routine. Local races attract people of all abilities and provide a supportive and encouraging environment to complete a goal. Many people walk the entire race, while others will sprint from the beginning. If you'd rather wait until you're sure you can run the entire distance, sign up for one that is three or four months away, and work toward the goal.

The above tips and recommendations will put you on the right track to beginning a running regimen. In the long run, its all really up to you. Keep at it, mix up your runs and add some tweaks to change up your running patterns and you will soon find yourself over reaching your pre-determined distance goals. The best thing about setting a goal, is that after you have achieved it, and you spend a little time congratulating yourself on your accomplishment,,,,, YOU can always set a newer, higher goal…….Most of all,,,, Have FUN!!!


Read more

Why Run?

There are two types of people in this world. Those who run and those who do not.

Running is not the separation between the gym rats and the couch potatoes. It does not divide the big from the small. You will never get a “That Look” from someone when you participate in a run like you sometimes will when you go to a gym.

Running has grown to be, somewhat, of a multipurpose activity for all ages, sizes, and abilities. An activity of bragging rights, discussion topics at the bar and even one that drives relationships.

The oddest fact about running is that most people hate it.
Love it or hate it, people will line up at starting lines all over the country this year participating in various races, be it a 5K, a walk/run benefit, city marathons or the big stage marathons like the Boston and New York. There must be something that drives all those people to run on their own free will.

Why do people run?
Losing weight tends to be the most common answer to the aforementioned question. Running is the cheapest and most accessible way to lose the pounds. It is also something each of us can track on a regular basis against ourselves. Much like the game of golf, we are constantly striving to beat our last score,, in a runners case a better time/distance.

Bill Stanton, the Director of Marketing and Communications for the Myrtle Beach Marathon as well as a 30-year veteran runner, says that running is so simplistic that anyone can do it. There is little to no cost and you can do it anywhere at any time.

Efficiently burning calories to the tune of an average of 100 calories per mile for a 150-pound person, running can be very effective. The real weight loss “magic” is increasing your resting metabolism by building muscle mass. Which means you will burn more calories at rest as a runner than you will as a non-runner.

You also need to track your time and performance during your runs. One way to do that is by investing in a Running Watch like the newly released Polar M600, the Garmin Forerunner 735XT or the Forerunner 235 which not only give GPS Pace, but these models will track your activity all day and all night long. The number of steps you’ve taken, calories burned, the distance you’ve traveled (which is impt. for a runner). And you won’t miss an impt. call or email cause the Alta has smart notifications as well. It’s a great companion to have with you when your by yourself on that open road!

Eating Right to Fuel Your Body.
Experts say that a post run snack is essential, but should not exceed 150 calories. Refuel the body, not over feed the stomach.

Running is not considered a cure-all, but, rather, a single piece of the health puzzle. There are many benefits that can be attributed to embracing a running lifestyle and that can be the subject for another post. Right now we want to mention the reasons why people just run.

Stanton reminds us that running is a sport and one that should not be taken for granted. He encourages beginners to ease into it, get doctors’ advice so that you can start your program with a clear conscious and not have to worry about hurting yourself by embracing the sport.

Running, especially long distance, is a taxing activity and should have medical clearance before you lace up and tear off into the street. Depending upon your physical condition and weight loss goals, a slow start may be more productive. If you can couple it with some healthy eating habits and overall health plan, you are in a much better position for success. Your doctor can help you with this and there are numerous websites and articles of information on the best way to fuel your body so it is ready to perform at its best for you. You never want to embark on any exercise regimen without consuming the proper food and in the right quantity. If one of your goals is to lose weight running, you will only be doing yourself a dis-service and possible harm if you think cutting back on your food intake is the way to go.

Let’s Get High
There is a pill for everything these days. Instead of opting to line up at the local pharmacy, or worse, making a purchase on-line from the many self-help motivators you will be better off just going about your running program the natural way, start out with small runs and work your way up to ½ mile, mile, 5K runs and then the sky’s the limit. There are many advocates out there that think and have proven that the benefits of a healthy attitude can be associated by a healthy amount of exercise and the proven release of endorphins that takes place while running can lend credence to that fact! Many studies think that running does the work of those little pills.

Running, and exercising, in general, has been shown to reduce stress, relieve mild depression and lower anxiety. Commonly known as “runners high”, the release of endorphins into the brain can create a euphoric, calm and, well, a high sensation.

Granted you cannot just jog a few steps and feel the buzz. In fact, there is no scientific proof regarding how long, how far or how often “runners high” occurs. It kicks in at different moments for each run with an array of variables to blame. Most runners still dismiss it as simply “feeling good”. A calm sense of happiness that lasts a few minutes or a few hours. Each runner experiences it a bit differently but all agree, once you are at that stage of the run, things just seem to click and you are moving smoothly.

Most people use this time as the only time they get to unplug from everything going on in their active lives and just exist for a bit in that running state of mind. It’s that improving your body feeling while running and getting it moving while unplugging yourself from our technology-saturated world that helps you in dealing better with life’s every day happenings.
No psychologist or doctor on the earth would prescribe running to cure any mental conditions for lack of proof.  Some runners who suffer from these ailments do attest that the exercise reduces the adverse feelings they may experience.

If you believe that the mind and body are connected, it would make sense that getting in shape would have a positive effect on your brain and emotional state. At minimum, you would agree that is would be worth a try if someone were serious about managing their stress or anxiety.

Running has grown to a subculture of positive vibes, support, and interaction. For some, running just provides a peace of mind state that others agree make them feel special about the running family they have joined. Everyone who is running on any particular day is automatically accepted into “the group.” If you start a race, you are, automatically, part of the club.

Unlike other exercise groups, there is not a lot of special lingo, gear or rules that you need to memorize. You can just merge your way into being part of the crowd. Just start running.

Social interaction has grown to be a driving force in sticking to an exercise regimen for many people who just do not get that from the weekly visit to the gym. Group runs, relays, family runs and everything in between have made running very much inclusive where we find many other recreational exercises to be exclusive.

For Corey Chuhaloff, a seven -year competitive runner and a five-year member of the Red Cross Rescue Racers, running is an outlet. Each run is a time for her to “evaluate my busy life.” She says that she runs with friends most of the time and that does not detract from her own personal goals.

Runners, typically, just want other runners to keep going. Unless they are actually racing. The supportive community at the organized events seems to be based on not only inclusion, but education, fellowship and, the sense of "belonging" . Running has truly become a sport for all generations.

Why People Stop Running
We happen to be at the time of year when most people quit working out from their New Year’s resolutions. Runners who set out to hit the mileage marks have, most likely, long since quit.

Running is time-consuming. Unlike those late-night television promises of “lose ten pounds in 30 minutes”, running is a time commitment. At least 30 minutes each run, but most runners have goals that will take over an hour at a time. Not exactly conducive to the busy lifestyle.

Weather is also a big quit factor. It is cold. It is hot. It is windy. It is raining. There are a lot of weather combinations that will keep you inside. Running takes commitment, and possibly some extra clothing, to make it a habit.

Injury is another reason people quit. Stretching and warming up is often over-looked by beginners. It is vitally important. From ankles, hips, knees, shins, feet and muscles, there are a lot of parts that need convincing that running is a good idea.

The “Phoebe-syndrome” is a very real obstacle for some would-be runners. Some people just look funny when they run. Unless you check you’re self-conscious at the door and run anyway, you probably will not enjoy feeling as funny as you look. Which presents another valid reason to quit.

Despite the vast reasons to never run, it would seem that the challenge of distance, possible obstacles and inclement weather are enough to keep us running for the thrill of it.

The drive of runners, whether for self-help improvement or just because they have adopted the sport, offers insights to the addictive qualities of running. As easy as it is to start, it is twice as easy to quit. Passionate runners seem not to have that word in their vocabulary.

If you feel the need to enjoy a breeze, unplug from the stress of work and social life for a bit and just get your mind and body working together, running may be the answer. More and more people are finding that it offers more than just a free t-shirt and a medal. It is a sense of accomplishment. It is a sense of belonging. It is a sense of vitality and sanity.  

So what are you waiting for, lace up those running shoes and experience just what running is all about!

 Finally, we have some great recommendations for Running GPS Watches

Read more
There are two types of people in this world. Those who run and those who do not.

Running is not the separation between the gym rats and the couch potatoes. It does not divide the big from the small. You will never get a “That Look” from someone when you participate in a run like you sometimes will when you go to a gym.

Running has grown to be, somewhat, of a multipurpose activity for all ages, sizes, and abilities. An activity of bragging rights, discussion topics at the bar and even one that drives relationships.

The oddest fact about running is that most people hate it.
Love it or hate it, people will line up at starting lines all over the country this year participating in various races, be it a 5K, a walk/run benefit, city marathons or the big stage marathons like the Boston and New York. There must be something that drives all those people to run on their own free will.

Why do people run?
Losing weight tends to be the most common answer to the aforementioned question. Running is the cheapest and most accessible way to lose the pounds. It is also something each of us can track on a regular basis against ourselves. Much like the game of golf, we are constantly striving to beat our last score,, in a runners case a better time/distance.

Bill Stanton, the Director of Marketing and Communications for the Myrtle Beach Marathon as well as a 30-year veteran runner, says that running is so simplistic that anyone can do it. There is little to no cost and you can do it anywhere at any time.

Efficiently burning calories to the tune of an average of 100 calories per mile for a 150-pound person, running can be very effective. The real weight loss “magic” is increasing your resting metabolism by building muscle mass. Which means you will burn more calories at rest as a runner than you will as a non-runner.

You also need to track your time and performance during your runs. One way to do that is by investing in a Running Watch like the newly released Polar M600, the Garmin Forerunner 735XT or the Forerunner 235 which not only give GPS Pace, but these models will track your activity all day and all night long. The number of steps you’ve taken, calories burned, the distance you’ve traveled (which is impt. for a runner). And you won’t miss an impt. call or email cause the Alta has smart notifications as well. It’s a great companion to have with you when your by yourself on that open road!

Eating Right to Fuel Your Body.
Experts say that a post run snack is essential, but should not exceed 150 calories. Refuel the body, not over feed the stomach.

Running is not considered a cure-all, but, rather, a single piece of the health puzzle. There are many benefits that can be attributed to embracing a running lifestyle and that can be the subject for another post. Right now we want to mention the reasons why people just run.

Stanton reminds us that running is a sport and one that should not be taken for granted. He encourages beginners to ease into it, get doctors’ advice so that you can start your program with a clear conscious and not have to worry about hurting yourself by embracing the sport.

Running, especially long distance, is a taxing activity and should have medical clearance before you lace up and tear off into the street. Depending upon your physical condition and weight loss goals, a slow start may be more productive. If you can couple it with some healthy eating habits and overall health plan, you are in a much better position for success. Your doctor can help you with this and there are numerous websites and articles of information on the best way to fuel your body so it is ready to perform at its best for you. You never want to embark on any exercise regimen without consuming the proper food and in the right quantity. If one of your goals is to lose weight running, you will only be doing yourself a dis-service and possible harm if you think cutting back on your food intake is the way to go.

Let’s Get High
There is a pill for everything these days. Instead of opting to line up at the local pharmacy, or worse, making a purchase on-line from the many self-help motivators you will be better off just going about your running program the natural way, start out with small runs and work your way up to ½ mile, mile, 5K runs and then the sky’s the limit. There are many advocates out there that think and have proven that the benefits of a healthy attitude can be associated by a healthy amount of exercise and the proven release of endorphins that takes place while running can lend credence to that fact! Many studies think that running does the work of those little pills.

Running, and exercising, in general, has been shown to reduce stress, relieve mild depression and lower anxiety. Commonly known as “runners high”, the release of endorphins into the brain can create a euphoric, calm and, well, a high sensation.

Granted you cannot just jog a few steps and feel the buzz. In fact, there is no scientific proof regarding how long, how far or how often “runners high” occurs. It kicks in at different moments for each run with an array of variables to blame. Most runners still dismiss it as simply “feeling good”. A calm sense of happiness that lasts a few minutes or a few hours. Each runner experiences it a bit differently but all agree, once you are at that stage of the run, things just seem to click and you are moving smoothly.

Most people use this time as the only time they get to unplug from everything going on in their active lives and just exist for a bit in that running state of mind. It’s that improving your body feeling while running and getting it moving while unplugging yourself from our technology-saturated world that helps you in dealing better with life’s every day happenings.
No psychologist or doctor on the earth would prescribe running to cure any mental conditions for lack of proof.  Some runners who suffer from these ailments do attest that the exercise reduces the adverse feelings they may experience.

If you believe that the mind and body are connected, it would make sense that getting in shape would have a positive effect on your brain and emotional state. At minimum, you would agree that is would be worth a try if someone were serious about managing their stress or anxiety.

Running has grown to a subculture of positive vibes, support, and interaction. For some, running just provides a peace of mind state that others agree make them feel special about the running family they have joined. Everyone who is running on any particular day is automatically accepted into “the group.” If you start a race, you are, automatically, part of the club.

Unlike other exercise groups, there is not a lot of special lingo, gear or rules that you need to memorize. You can just merge your way into being part of the crowd. Just start running.

Social interaction has grown to be a driving force in sticking to an exercise regimen for many people who just do not get that from the weekly visit to the gym. Group runs, relays, family runs and everything in between have made running very much inclusive where we find many other recreational exercises to be exclusive.

For Corey Chuhaloff, a seven -year competitive runner and a five-year member of the Red Cross Rescue Racers, running is an outlet. Each run is a time for her to “evaluate my busy life.” She says that she runs with friends most of the time and that does not detract from her own personal goals.

Runners, typically, just want other runners to keep going. Unless they are actually racing. The supportive community at the organized events seems to be based on not only inclusion, but education, fellowship and, the sense of "belonging" . Running has truly become a sport for all generations.

Why People Stop Running
We happen to be at the time of year when most people quit working out from their New Year’s resolutions. Runners who set out to hit the mileage marks have, most likely, long since quit.

Running is time-consuming. Unlike those late-night television promises of “lose ten pounds in 30 minutes”, running is a time commitment. At least 30 minutes each run, but most runners have goals that will take over an hour at a time. Not exactly conducive to the busy lifestyle.

Weather is also a big quit factor. It is cold. It is hot. It is windy. It is raining. There are a lot of weather combinations that will keep you inside. Running takes commitment, and possibly some extra clothing, to make it a habit.

Injury is another reason people quit. Stretching and warming up is often over-looked by beginners. It is vitally important. From ankles, hips, knees, shins, feet and muscles, there are a lot of parts that need convincing that running is a good idea.

The “Phoebe-syndrome” is a very real obstacle for some would-be runners. Some people just look funny when they run. Unless you check you’re self-conscious at the door and run anyway, you probably will not enjoy feeling as funny as you look. Which presents another valid reason to quit.

Despite the vast reasons to never run, it would seem that the challenge of distance, possible obstacles and inclement weather are enough to keep us running for the thrill of it.

The drive of runners, whether for self-help improvement or just because they have adopted the sport, offers insights to the addictive qualities of running. As easy as it is to start, it is twice as easy to quit. Passionate runners seem not to have that word in their vocabulary.

If you feel the need to enjoy a breeze, unplug from the stress of work and social life for a bit and just get your mind and body working together, running may be the answer. More and more people are finding that it offers more than just a free t-shirt and a medal. It is a sense of accomplishment. It is a sense of belonging. It is a sense of vitality and sanity.  

So what are you waiting for, lace up those running shoes and experience just what running is all about!

 Finally, we have some great recommendations for Running GPS Watches

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How to Pace Your First Half or Full Marathon

Ok I’m running my first marathon this summer as one of my bucket lists. How fast should I start? Should I use the Pace Team?

This is a great question!  A lot depends on just what kind of shape your in right now. For our purposes we are going to assume that you have worked youself up to a pretty sound runners gate, with plenty of mile, 5 mile and such so that you can get yourself ready to tackle that marathon. It doesn’t require formulas or splits. All it requires is that you run by your bodies feedback and effort on the given day.

The reason for this is because predicting how you’re going to race in the marathon is a bit like predicting the weather. You can be on or off, and when it’s your first marathon r any run for that matter, in the beginning, , you don’t have a lot of history to go on in terms of predictions. That is because there are so many variables that can affect your performance, some of which you can’t control. You can control your training, nutrition, and sleep, for the most part, but not the weather or illness.

For example, if you plan to race at a 10-minute pace based on a 10K race you ran or your training pace, that can backfire quickly if the weather is hot, you have a headwind, or you’re just not feeling all that great on race day. It’s a little like picking the winning lottery ticket, and going by pace is not the most effective way to train or race.

Endurance running is all about energy management. Pacing yourself from within and on the given day will ensure a strong finish no matter what the clock says.

Here are some race pacing strategies for a first time half or full marathoner.

Think about running like using a child'd color wheel, ( we've all had them as kids)

Run YELLOW -  Run the first 7 or 14 miles for the half or full marathon respectively at an easy, conversational effort (the yellow—a.k.a. “happy”—zone). If you can’t talk to your buddy about how where your going to place your participation medal that you get after the race, then you’re going too fast. Slow down.

Run ORANGE -  Dial it up to a moderate effort for miles 8-12 and 15-24 for the half and full respectively. This is one level above your happy zone, where you can start to hear your breathing but you’re not out of breath. You can speak in one-word increments. This is when you need to go fishing. Cast out your invisible fishing line and hook a runner ahead of you who went out too fast, like the rabbit racing against the tortoise. Reel them in slowly, staying in the Orange Zone, and focus on the next person. There is nothing more empowering than to be able to pass people (nicely) in the second half of a race. It keeps your mind mentally activated and focused on the positive and allows you to run stronger than you could ever imagine.

Run RED -  And for the final 1.1 or 2.2 miles—the grand finale—dial it up to a hard, but controlled, effort and finish strong. This isn’t an all-out gut-busting effort – it’s a notch up from orange and requires your full attention to maintain. You won’t be able to speak in this zone, but that’s okay. You’re almost done, and you’ll be talking about the race the rest of the day!

When you devote the early miles to running easy and based on your effort in the moment, you can push harder in the later miles. You’re not wasted because you went out too fast (the most common mistake). When that happens you run RED >ORANGE >YELLOW > WHITE (crawling). Runners that do this often say, “I was on a four-hour pace until mile 16.” This is why you have to stay focused on your initial pace that you set.  It's human nature to want to start out strong, but after you've run a few, you will be able to get over that common mistake.

It’s important to note that this pacing strategy is geared to first-timers or those coming back to running from taking some time away for any particular reason. Seasoned runners looking to improve performance, and based on their fitness, training, and experience, can still use the base of this formula, but again, everyone is different and so are their bodies strengths and weaknesses.  But even then, everyone needs to build up their base of training and racing gradually so they push it a little more each time.

Running in a pace group is an excellent way to hold yourself back and avoid going out too fast in the early stages. You can guesstimate an easy effort (go conservative) and run with them while you’re in the YELLOW ZONE miles. It is important to still tune into your body though, as that pace can feel harder or easier on race day as mentioned above. If all feels well, set individual mark goals, and migrate on to the ORANGE ZONE.

Good luck, keep it simple, and tune into your body. Let the race come to you and celebrate your finish. You only get to run your first marathon once!

 

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Ok I’m running my first marathon this summer as one of my bucket lists. How fast should I start? Should I use the Pace Team?

This is a great question!  A lot depends on just what kind of shape your in right now. For our purposes we are going to assume that you have worked youself up to a pretty sound runners gate, with plenty of mile, 5 mile and such so that you can get yourself ready to tackle that marathon. It doesn’t require formulas or splits. All it requires is that you run by your bodies feedback and effort on the given day.

The reason for this is because predicting how you’re going to race in the marathon is a bit like predicting the weather. You can be on or off, and when it’s your first marathon r any run for that matter, in the beginning, , you don’t have a lot of history to go on in terms of predictions. That is because there are so many variables that can affect your performance, some of which you can’t control. You can control your training, nutrition, and sleep, for the most part, but not the weather or illness.

For example, if you plan to race at a 10-minute pace based on a 10K race you ran or your training pace, that can backfire quickly if the weather is hot, you have a headwind, or you’re just not feeling all that great on race day. It’s a little like picking the winning lottery ticket, and going by pace is not the most effective way to train or race.

Endurance running is all about energy management. Pacing yourself from within and on the given day will ensure a strong finish no matter what the clock says.

Here are some race pacing strategies for a first time half or full marathoner.

Think about running like using a child'd color wheel, ( we've all had them as kids)

Run YELLOW -  Run the first 7 or 14 miles for the half or full marathon respectively at an easy, conversational effort (the yellow—a.k.a. “happy”—zone). If you can’t talk to your buddy about how where your going to place your participation medal that you get after the race, then you’re going too fast. Slow down.

Run ORANGE -  Dial it up to a moderate effort for miles 8-12 and 15-24 for the half and full respectively. This is one level above your happy zone, where you can start to hear your breathing but you’re not out of breath. You can speak in one-word increments. This is when you need to go fishing. Cast out your invisible fishing line and hook a runner ahead of you who went out too fast, like the rabbit racing against the tortoise. Reel them in slowly, staying in the Orange Zone, and focus on the next person. There is nothing more empowering than to be able to pass people (nicely) in the second half of a race. It keeps your mind mentally activated and focused on the positive and allows you to run stronger than you could ever imagine.

Run RED -  And for the final 1.1 or 2.2 miles—the grand finale—dial it up to a hard, but controlled, effort and finish strong. This isn’t an all-out gut-busting effort – it’s a notch up from orange and requires your full attention to maintain. You won’t be able to speak in this zone, but that’s okay. You’re almost done, and you’ll be talking about the race the rest of the day!

When you devote the early miles to running easy and based on your effort in the moment, you can push harder in the later miles. You’re not wasted because you went out too fast (the most common mistake). When that happens you run RED >ORANGE >YELLOW > WHITE (crawling). Runners that do this often say, “I was on a four-hour pace until mile 16.” This is why you have to stay focused on your initial pace that you set.  It's human nature to want to start out strong, but after you've run a few, you will be able to get over that common mistake.

It’s important to note that this pacing strategy is geared to first-timers or those coming back to running from taking some time away for any particular reason. Seasoned runners looking to improve performance, and based on their fitness, training, and experience, can still use the base of this formula, but again, everyone is different and so are their bodies strengths and weaknesses.  But even then, everyone needs to build up their base of training and racing gradually so they push it a little more each time.

Running in a pace group is an excellent way to hold yourself back and avoid going out too fast in the early stages. You can guesstimate an easy effort (go conservative) and run with them while you’re in the YELLOW ZONE miles. It is important to still tune into your body though, as that pace can feel harder or easier on race day as mentioned above. If all feels well, set individual mark goals, and migrate on to the ORANGE ZONE.

Good luck, keep it simple, and tune into your body. Let the race come to you and celebrate your finish. You only get to run your first marathon once!

 

Read more