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Your Exercising, Great! Tuning Up Your Bod Is A Great Idea, But How Fit Is Your Heart?

Ok, you jumped on the fitness bandwagon and get to the gym when you can, eat healthier and even try to walk/run a few miles every week, along with throwing in a bike ride maybe once or twice a month. Sounds like your doing everything you need to, in order to be healthier right? Well, just how is your heart holding up to all of this?

Today, when your talking with someone about how you’re now exercising, someone in the group will probably lead the conversation to ask what your normal exercise routine heart rate is and if you're reaching your target zone. And you just stand there looking at him/her without knowing how to answer. Mainly because you just don’t know what your target zone or what your heart rate should be. So, what should they be?

The heart rate is one of the 'vital signs,' or the important indicators of health in the human body. It measures the number of times per minute that the heart contracts or beats.
The speed of the heartbeat varies as a result of physical activity, threats to safety, and emotional responses. The resting heart rate refers to the heart rate when a person is relaxed.

While a normal heart rate does not guarantee that a person is free of health problems, it is a useful benchmark for identifying a range of health issues. The heart is a muscular organ in the center of the chest. When it beats, the heart pumps blood containing oxygen and nutrients around the body and brings back waste products. A healthy heart supplies the body with just the right amount of blood at the right rate for whatever the body is doing at that time.

To get an idea of what your heart rate should be, it’s recommended that you exercise within 55 to 85 percent of your maximum heart rate for at least 20 to 30 minutes to get the best results from aerobic exercise. The MHR (can be roughly calculated as using 220 minus your age) this is the upper limit of what your cardiovascular system can handle during physical activity.
For example, if you're 45 years old, subtract 45 from 220 to get a maximum heart rate of 175. This is the maximum number of times your heart should beat per minute during exercise.

When training for fitness, it is important not to put too much strain on the heart. However, an individual needs the heart rate to increase while exercising to provide more oxygen and energy for the rest of the body.

While the heart rate increases as a result of physical activity, an overall decrease in target heart rate is possible over time. This means that the heart is working less to get the necessary nutrients and oxygen to different parts of the body, making it more efficient.

Cardiovascular training aims to reduce the target heart rate. The ideal target heart rate reduces with age. It is also worth noting the maximum heart rate. This demonstrates the full capability of the heart, and it is normally reached through high-intensity exercise.

Exercise is a way to bring down the overall heart rate. The American Heart Association (AHA) states that the maximum heart rate during exercise should be roughly equal to 220 bpm minus the age of the person. As the body of each individual will react to exercise differently, the target heart rate is presented as a range known as the target heart rate zone.

A tool that is available to everyone today to track your heart rate and know where your at in regards to your target zone is to get a good, accurate heart rate monitor that can monitor your exercise activity and let you know just what your heart rate is, both by being active and when your at rest and how much time should elapse in between beginning a new exercise routine.
One such smartwatch is the Garmin Forerunner 735XT GPS Running Multisport Watch
This wrist-based heart rate monitor will track your beats per minutes, and the activity tracker will help you keep a close tab on your calories and sleep throughout the day. It's easy to view heart rate measuring function at the wrist, gives you an actual read on just how well you’re doing.
It also comes with advanced dynamics available for swimming, running, and cycling with stride length, vertical ratio, and more.  It can estimate your lactate threshold, offers a recovery advisor, and VO2 max estimate.

You can never be too careful when exercising not to overdo it! And having a tool like the Garmin Forerunner 735 strapped to your wrist can provide you with some necessary information that you can use to give you a heads up if you're moving into a danger zone. Remember, any type of fitness monitor is only another tool that’s available to you. We always recommend that you stay in contact with your physician on a regular basis for checkups to keep you both aware of any potential danger signals. A good smartwatch like the Garmin Forerunner 735 can give you a heads up about a potential problem that you can act on by getting to your doctor to get it checked out.

So, exercise, do it right and monitor your stats to make sure you and your heart are on the same wavelength!

 

Read more

Ok, you jumped on the fitness bandwagon and get to the gym when you can, eat healthier and even try to walk/run a few miles every week, along with throwing in a bike ride maybe once or twice a month. Sounds like your doing everything you need to, in order to be healthier right? Well, just how is your heart holding up to all of this?

Today, when your talking with someone about how you’re now exercising, someone in the group will probably lead the conversation to ask what your normal exercise routine heart rate is and if you're reaching your target zone. And you just stand there looking at him/her without knowing how to answer. Mainly because you just don’t know what your target zone or what your heart rate should be. So, what should they be?

The heart rate is one of the 'vital signs,' or the important indicators of health in the human body. It measures the number of times per minute that the heart contracts or beats.
The speed of the heartbeat varies as a result of physical activity, threats to safety, and emotional responses. The resting heart rate refers to the heart rate when a person is relaxed.

While a normal heart rate does not guarantee that a person is free of health problems, it is a useful benchmark for identifying a range of health issues. The heart is a muscular organ in the center of the chest. When it beats, the heart pumps blood containing oxygen and nutrients around the body and brings back waste products. A healthy heart supplies the body with just the right amount of blood at the right rate for whatever the body is doing at that time.

To get an idea of what your heart rate should be, it’s recommended that you exercise within 55 to 85 percent of your maximum heart rate for at least 20 to 30 minutes to get the best results from aerobic exercise. The MHR (can be roughly calculated as using 220 minus your age) this is the upper limit of what your cardiovascular system can handle during physical activity.
For example, if you're 45 years old, subtract 45 from 220 to get a maximum heart rate of 175. This is the maximum number of times your heart should beat per minute during exercise.

When training for fitness, it is important not to put too much strain on the heart. However, an individual needs the heart rate to increase while exercising to provide more oxygen and energy for the rest of the body.

While the heart rate increases as a result of physical activity, an overall decrease in target heart rate is possible over time. This means that the heart is working less to get the necessary nutrients and oxygen to different parts of the body, making it more efficient.

Cardiovascular training aims to reduce the target heart rate. The ideal target heart rate reduces with age. It is also worth noting the maximum heart rate. This demonstrates the full capability of the heart, and it is normally reached through high-intensity exercise.

Exercise is a way to bring down the overall heart rate. The American Heart Association (AHA) states that the maximum heart rate during exercise should be roughly equal to 220 bpm minus the age of the person. As the body of each individual will react to exercise differently, the target heart rate is presented as a range known as the target heart rate zone.

A tool that is available to everyone today to track your heart rate and know where your at in regards to your target zone is to get a good, accurate heart rate monitor that can monitor your exercise activity and let you know just what your heart rate is, both by being active and when your at rest and how much time should elapse in between beginning a new exercise routine.
One such smartwatch is the Garmin Forerunner 735XT GPS Running Multisport Watch
This wrist-based heart rate monitor will track your beats per minutes, and the activity tracker will help you keep a close tab on your calories and sleep throughout the day. It's easy to view heart rate measuring function at the wrist, gives you an actual read on just how well you’re doing.
It also comes with advanced dynamics available for swimming, running, and cycling with stride length, vertical ratio, and more.  It can estimate your lactate threshold, offers a recovery advisor, and VO2 max estimate.

You can never be too careful when exercising not to overdo it! And having a tool like the Garmin Forerunner 735 strapped to your wrist can provide you with some necessary information that you can use to give you a heads up if you're moving into a danger zone. Remember, any type of fitness monitor is only another tool that’s available to you. We always recommend that you stay in contact with your physician on a regular basis for checkups to keep you both aware of any potential danger signals. A good smartwatch like the Garmin Forerunner 735 can give you a heads up about a potential problem that you can act on by getting to your doctor to get it checked out.

So, exercise, do it right and monitor your stats to make sure you and your heart are on the same wavelength!

 

Read more

So, Just How Many Hats Do You Wear Each Day? Well, The Garmin Vivosmart HR Has It’s Share!

In today's climate, things are often changing, sometimes it seems within days or even minutes. We are all being given a few extra tasks to handle, probably because we are known to be able to get things done.  I like that. What I also like is keeping myself fit and in the best physical shape that  I can.  In order to do this, it takes commitment to exercise, eating right and a good mindset.  One of the tools that I use to keep myself on track is a fitness watch, tracker, monitor. Whatever you want to call them, you have to agree that these tech watches can provide you with all the data you need to keep you on track to meet your physical goals. They now even let you pay at the WaWa, for that bottle of water after a run, how nice is that?  One brand of watch that I like to keep on my wrist are those made by Garmin.

The name Garmin is well known today as being one of the best providers of “Smart Watch” technology. Implementing its advanced GPS functionality into a watch that can monitor your fitness levels and also keeps you from getting lost is just another reason why a product from Garmin can keep you aware of what’s happening both around you and “YOU” itself. I mean your activity/fitness progress!

And Garmin has you covered as far as pricing to go along with all of that functionality they build into their watches. One of my favorites is the Garmin Vivosmart HR. It's a fitness/activity tracker that also keeps track of your heart rate data points. This device combines all the functionality of a heart rate monitor and activity tracker with a smartwatch. Talk about wearing a lot of hats,,,, The functionality of this tracker is really well thought out!

Since we all know that keeping ourselves moving is one of the best ways to keep ourselves in shape on a daily basis, and the Vivosmart HR  can monitor just about everything we choose to do. Whether you’re going for a jog, playing a pick-up game with friends or trying out a new boot camp class, it quantifies the intensity of your fitness activities using intensity minutes. This feature lets you monitor your progress against activity goals recommended by health organizations such as the American Heart Association.

The Vivosmart is able to track distance, time and pace for indoor or outdoor activities. With it’s GPS, you can get even more accurate distance and pace stats as well as a map of your activity when running or walking outdoors. In addition to tracking your runs, steps, and calories, the Vívosmart HR, measures floors climbed and intensity minutes.

Garmin has been developing cutting-edge GPS technology since its founding in 1989. And since 1991, one of its first large clients has been the U.S. Army. And the technology its been creating since then has only gotten better and more accurate, which is a prime factor amongst long distance runners. After all, who wants to carry a paper map around with them, when you're navigating a long distance run, with little chance on taking the wrong path. And since this watch uses smart technology, you are able to stay connected and upload your data automatically to Garmin Connect, via your smartphone!  This way, your family, and friends have a pretty good idea just where and when you are as your running a race, or just out on a training run.

Keeping your progress stats available is important for getting the most out of your training and this app is universal across all Garmin devices, and can even carry data over from a previous device to a new device. It also syncs with your app in the Google Play Store or iTunes account.

The OLED display will track information about your workout, which will be logged in the Garmin Connect app. The Garmin Connect App includes a daily steps goal, distance traveled, calories burned, heart rate, and a whole lot more. All of this is visualized in a chart generated by the Connect app.

So, if you're looking for a great smartwatch with just about all the functionality you're going to need to monitor your stats as you work out, train, or just call it plain exercising, the Garmin Vivosmart Activity Tracker is one you need to take a serious look at.

So, who’s up for a little CrossFit??


Read more

In today's climate, things are often changing, sometimes it seems within days or even minutes. We are all being given a few extra tasks to handle, probably because we are known to be able to get things done.  I like that. What I also like is keeping myself fit and in the best physical shape that  I can.  In order to do this, it takes commitment to exercise, eating right and a good mindset.  One of the tools that I use to keep myself on track is a fitness watch, tracker, monitor. Whatever you want to call them, you have to agree that these tech watches can provide you with all the data you need to keep you on track to meet your physical goals. They now even let you pay at the WaWa, for that bottle of water after a run, how nice is that?  One brand of watch that I like to keep on my wrist are those made by Garmin.

The name Garmin is well known today as being one of the best providers of “Smart Watch” technology. Implementing its advanced GPS functionality into a watch that can monitor your fitness levels and also keeps you from getting lost is just another reason why a product from Garmin can keep you aware of what’s happening both around you and “YOU” itself. I mean your activity/fitness progress!

And Garmin has you covered as far as pricing to go along with all of that functionality they build into their watches. One of my favorites is the Garmin Vivosmart HR. It's a fitness/activity tracker that also keeps track of your heart rate data points. This device combines all the functionality of a heart rate monitor and activity tracker with a smartwatch. Talk about wearing a lot of hats,,,, The functionality of this tracker is really well thought out!

Since we all know that keeping ourselves moving is one of the best ways to keep ourselves in shape on a daily basis, and the Vivosmart HR  can monitor just about everything we choose to do. Whether you’re going for a jog, playing a pick-up game with friends or trying out a new boot camp class, it quantifies the intensity of your fitness activities using intensity minutes. This feature lets you monitor your progress against activity goals recommended by health organizations such as the American Heart Association.

The Vivosmart is able to track distance, time and pace for indoor or outdoor activities. With it’s GPS, you can get even more accurate distance and pace stats as well as a map of your activity when running or walking outdoors. In addition to tracking your runs, steps, and calories, the Vívosmart HR, measures floors climbed and intensity minutes.

Garmin has been developing cutting-edge GPS technology since its founding in 1989. And since 1991, one of its first large clients has been the U.S. Army. And the technology its been creating since then has only gotten better and more accurate, which is a prime factor amongst long distance runners. After all, who wants to carry a paper map around with them, when you're navigating a long distance run, with little chance on taking the wrong path. And since this watch uses smart technology, you are able to stay connected and upload your data automatically to Garmin Connect, via your smartphone!  This way, your family, and friends have a pretty good idea just where and when you are as your running a race, or just out on a training run.

Keeping your progress stats available is important for getting the most out of your training and this app is universal across all Garmin devices, and can even carry data over from a previous device to a new device. It also syncs with your app in the Google Play Store or iTunes account.

The OLED display will track information about your workout, which will be logged in the Garmin Connect app. The Garmin Connect App includes a daily steps goal, distance traveled, calories burned, heart rate, and a whole lot more. All of this is visualized in a chart generated by the Connect app.

So, if you're looking for a great smartwatch with just about all the functionality you're going to need to monitor your stats as you work out, train, or just call it plain exercising, the Garmin Vivosmart Activity Tracker is one you need to take a serious look at.

So, who’s up for a little CrossFit??


Read more

Are You Training To Become Muscle Ripped, Or Muscle Fit?

I’m a big fan of all the new Marvel movies. One of my favorites is the Captain America films and the ones he is in with the Avengers. Watching those movies kind of makes everyone daydreams a little about how they would look if they were in the same shape as these superheroes. But if you look at their physique’s while they are definitely in great shape, none, except maybe the Hulk has an over-abundance of muscles rippling as they toss around those villains. So why are looking to get those large oversized muscles, when in doing so, most people later find that being muscle bound does not provide them with the overall endurance and for the most part strength to go the distance in a long, hard-fought athletic game. Now don’t get me wrong. I’m a firm believer in strength training but I’ve also found that you need to find a balance in almost everything and training to be fit, strong and able to keep going, to me is a lot better than having your shirt stretched tight over large pecs and biceps!

After if you think about it, in watching most athletic games, most of these athletes and I mean the most successful ones look like they’ve never set foot in a gym. While large muscles provide the power needed to perform work, even those with bulging biceps find it difficult to perform work over time. Muscular endurance can be a far more valuable fitness trait than pure strength, especially for those who play sports that require sustained effort for the duration of a game. The best way to build muscular endurance is simple: lower the intensity and increase the frequency.

It's a given that one of the reasons that weight training for building muscles for strength appeals to so many people is that it takes less of a time commitment. After all, you do a series of squats, some deadlifting and bench presses three times a week and you call it a good session. But muscular endurance requires more commitment to your workout routines. Like a good cardio workout, there’s no minimum for calling it a day. The more frequently you push your body and the muscles under that skin the more your body will be able to power through whatever you're demanding of it!

Keeping track of how well your performing is also key to being successful at your training. To do this right you need to monitor just how well you're doing at each phase of your workout. A good Activity Monitor can keep your workouts honest when you may be tempted to let a few things slide because you’re a bit tired today. Tracking your workouts via that Activity Monitor, and it's ability to supply you with data every time it syncs with Garmin Connect™, can go a long way to allowing you to view just how well your actually doing. A tracker like the Garmin Vivosport GPS Sport & Activity Tracker can provide automatic uploads to the online Garmin community, where you can see your personalized data on detailed graphs.  It can provide the ability to let you join like-groups so that you can compete in weekly challenges and connect with other fitness enthusiasts. This way you're really not ever alone in your quest for building up your endurance while still creating a toned, muscular body, that will stand the test of time, (sports time that is!). And while the Vivosport monitors key aspects of your fitness, because it also monitors your heart rate, with help from Elevate 24/7, it’s a wrist-based heart rate monitoring feature, specific to Garmin. With the heart rate data it collects, Vívosport is able to estimate your VO2 Max and Fitness Age, 2 indicators of physical fitness that can improve over time with regular exercise. It also tracks your HRV (heart rate variability), which is used to calculate and display your stress level.


Keep in mind that those who hit the gym two or three days a week might have lukewarm muscular endurance, but those who add just one additional workout day, a week, begin to exact a bigger demand on your body, by pushing it a little farther than it's usual exercise regimen. Especially if you change up your routine with some cardio and maybe a HIIT session where you're pushing your routines faster with less resting time between reps. or sessions.

Now, while we’re not talking about building your body, so it looks like it can take on a tank, we still are a firm believer in using weights to get in shape, just not using hundreds of pounds as a goal in seeing just how much you can lift, One-Time! After all, you can't develop much muscular endurance by squatting 300-400 pounds and walk away thinking you've done your best. But if you lower the weight by say half, your actually putting new stress on the twitch muscle fibers (those that first fire in a workout) rather than on the muscular cell mass. This allows your body to develop these fibers and reduces the stress on any given workout. After all, by using less weight and increasing the number of reps, your muscular mass will stay the same but at the same time it becomes more elastic and can maintain that strength for longer periods of time. This results in your ability to have more endurance during an activity or physical work.

Overall, endurance workouts should aim for 10 to fifteen reps per set, which is twice as much as muscular strength builders do.

You know your body and it’s up to you to keep track of how much weight you need, in order to perform these extra reps. And naturally, as the session becomes easier, increase the number of reps, but gradually so you don't lessen the reps that you've already worked towards. Then after a time, increase the amount of weight with the extra reps. In this way, you are continuously pushing yourself each time your peak, so that your body does not grow used to a stale exercise regimen and will continue to grow muscle mass and in turn become well toned.

Bottom line, this is YOUR call, but again, don't go to extremes with adding more and more weight, add more reps instead!

In about 8 weeks of using this new method, you’re going to be able to see that you have quite a bit more strength that can sustain you through the other aspects of your training workouts. And you may be pleasantly surprised that you're also getting a leaner sculpted look to your overall body mass.

From your gym buddies here at HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com

 

 

Read more

I’m a big fan of all the new Marvel movies. One of my favorites is the Captain America films and the ones he is in with the Avengers. Watching those movies kind of makes everyone daydreams a little about how they would look if they were in the same shape as these superheroes. But if you look at their physique’s while they are definitely in great shape, none, except maybe the Hulk has an over-abundance of muscles rippling as they toss around those villains. So why are looking to get those large oversized muscles, when in doing so, most people later find that being muscle bound does not provide them with the overall endurance and for the most part strength to go the distance in a long, hard-fought athletic game. Now don’t get me wrong. I’m a firm believer in strength training but I’ve also found that you need to find a balance in almost everything and training to be fit, strong and able to keep going, to me is a lot better than having your shirt stretched tight over large pecs and biceps!

After if you think about it, in watching most athletic games, most of these athletes and I mean the most successful ones look like they’ve never set foot in a gym. While large muscles provide the power needed to perform work, even those with bulging biceps find it difficult to perform work over time. Muscular endurance can be a far more valuable fitness trait than pure strength, especially for those who play sports that require sustained effort for the duration of a game. The best way to build muscular endurance is simple: lower the intensity and increase the frequency.

It's a given that one of the reasons that weight training for building muscles for strength appeals to so many people is that it takes less of a time commitment. After all, you do a series of squats, some deadlifting and bench presses three times a week and you call it a good session. But muscular endurance requires more commitment to your workout routines. Like a good cardio workout, there’s no minimum for calling it a day. The more frequently you push your body and the muscles under that skin the more your body will be able to power through whatever you're demanding of it!

Keeping track of how well your performing is also key to being successful at your training. To do this right you need to monitor just how well you're doing at each phase of your workout. A good Activity Monitor can keep your workouts honest when you may be tempted to let a few things slide because you’re a bit tired today. Tracking your workouts via that Activity Monitor, and it's ability to supply you with data every time it syncs with Garmin Connect™, can go a long way to allowing you to view just how well your actually doing. A tracker like the Garmin Vivosport GPS Sport & Activity Tracker can provide automatic uploads to the online Garmin community, where you can see your personalized data on detailed graphs.  It can provide the ability to let you join like-groups so that you can compete in weekly challenges and connect with other fitness enthusiasts. This way you're really not ever alone in your quest for building up your endurance while still creating a toned, muscular body, that will stand the test of time, (sports time that is!). And while the Vivosport monitors key aspects of your fitness, because it also monitors your heart rate, with help from Elevate 24/7, it’s a wrist-based heart rate monitoring feature, specific to Garmin. With the heart rate data it collects, Vívosport is able to estimate your VO2 Max and Fitness Age, 2 indicators of physical fitness that can improve over time with regular exercise. It also tracks your HRV (heart rate variability), which is used to calculate and display your stress level.


Keep in mind that those who hit the gym two or three days a week might have lukewarm muscular endurance, but those who add just one additional workout day, a week, begin to exact a bigger demand on your body, by pushing it a little farther than it's usual exercise regimen. Especially if you change up your routine with some cardio and maybe a HIIT session where you're pushing your routines faster with less resting time between reps. or sessions.

Now, while we’re not talking about building your body, so it looks like it can take on a tank, we still are a firm believer in using weights to get in shape, just not using hundreds of pounds as a goal in seeing just how much you can lift, One-Time! After all, you can't develop much muscular endurance by squatting 300-400 pounds and walk away thinking you've done your best. But if you lower the weight by say half, your actually putting new stress on the twitch muscle fibers (those that first fire in a workout) rather than on the muscular cell mass. This allows your body to develop these fibers and reduces the stress on any given workout. After all, by using less weight and increasing the number of reps, your muscular mass will stay the same but at the same time it becomes more elastic and can maintain that strength for longer periods of time. This results in your ability to have more endurance during an activity or physical work.

Overall, endurance workouts should aim for 10 to fifteen reps per set, which is twice as much as muscular strength builders do.

You know your body and it’s up to you to keep track of how much weight you need, in order to perform these extra reps. And naturally, as the session becomes easier, increase the number of reps, but gradually so you don't lessen the reps that you've already worked towards. Then after a time, increase the amount of weight with the extra reps. In this way, you are continuously pushing yourself each time your peak, so that your body does not grow used to a stale exercise regimen and will continue to grow muscle mass and in turn become well toned.

Bottom line, this is YOUR call, but again, don't go to extremes with adding more and more weight, add more reps instead!

In about 8 weeks of using this new method, you’re going to be able to see that you have quite a bit more strength that can sustain you through the other aspects of your training workouts. And you may be pleasantly surprised that you're also getting a leaner sculpted look to your overall body mass.

From your gym buddies here at HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com

 

 

Read more

Autumn Is A Great Time To Get Out On Your Bike And Enjoy The Clean, Crisp Air.

Just Make Sure The Leaves Are The Only Thing That Is Falling!

Yes, the sun is rising a little later now that Fall is upon us. And the weather begins to move from warm and humid to cool and clean with a morning breeze to help chase those cobwebs from your brain. But with this change comes the opportunity to experience a feeling of embracing this change and maybe get out on some trails that you put off till now because you knew the terrain is a little more taxing and you wanted to put it off until a cooler time of year.

With the anticipation of getting out this time of year you need to and want to have the necessary tools on hand in order to make sure you’re going in the right direction, especially if you're going to be taking some new trails to enjoy the autumn season.

One good tool to have with you now and really any time of year is a good cycling computer, with an accurate GPS function to plot where you are against where you want to end up being. One that fits the bill is the Garmin Edge 1030 GPS Cycling Computer . Besides having preloaded maps, targeted on where you are, it also has the newest “Rider-to-Rider” messaging and Group-Track functions to help you stay aware and communicate with your buddies as you go. Edge 1030 is compatible with Varia rearview radar and smart bike lights, and it has built-in incident detection to help create a safer riding environment.

But with this change in the weather and the surroundings around you. You also need to prepare both you and your bike for things that go hand in hand with the Fall season.

One thing that a lot of people neglect to do this time of year is to check their tire pressure. After all, tire pressure varies with the changes in the temperature and with your tires being in direct contact with that cold hard road, the temps can make a difference with the air in your tires. A good rule of thumb is “Tire pressure can change with fluctuations in temperature. One example to use when comparing tire pressure to air temperature is for every 10 degrees F, tire pressure will adjust by 1 psi. For example, if the outside air temperature increases 10 degrees, the tire pressure will increase by 1 psi”.

That’s about as easy as I can make it. But you need to be aware of the fact that you should be checking that tire pressure on a regular basis and as the fall season moves into the colder winter months it should become a regular routine for you to make sure the tire pressure corresponds to the temperature changes. After all, there are and will be plenty of nice days in December, January and even February that you can get out there and enjoy the changes in the scenery that Mother Nature provides us with!

The Fall Season also brings shorter daylight hours along with grey days and rainy weather with it. Which means you should have your lights checked as well as that tire pressure. And it’s not a bad idea to get into the habit of checking both at the same time. This way you won’t have any surprises as you flick that switch and instead of seeing a nice bright beam of light, all you get is a tired, dim projection of gloom.

You want to make sure those batteries are at full strength. With that being said, lights are very important this time of year as we just mentioned. A great name in bike lighting is Varia. And two great lights that work in tandem with the Garmin 1030 are the Varia Smart Bike Lights for “Frontal Lighting” and the Garmin Varia Rearview Radar Tail Light . They both can work independently and they seamlessly integrate with the compatible Edge® cycling computers, the model 1030 that I mentioned above.

As a rider’s speed increases, the headlight automatically projects further ahead or closer, as a rider’s speed decreases when paired with select Edge computers.

As light conditions change, the smart Varia headlights and tail lights automatically get brighter or dimmer, so they are a great pairing of products that work when you need them to.

In the summer most cyclists are rarely caught out in the dark but in fall, particularly after the time changes, it can happen more often than not. Another simple rule that most of us forget is that if you are cycling west at sundown, the sun is in everyone's eyes and it can be very hard to see. For both you and those who may be sharing the road with you!

One other thing to keep in mind, as a helpful reminder is that you should be really careful on the few days after November 1st when the clocks roll back. This usually happens in the early part of the month. But regions of the country fluctuate so know when it happens in the area in which you cycle. Studies have shown a significant increase in the number of accidents immediately after the change because people are tired and they are not used to the conditions.

According to the CBC: A study, by two researchers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh in 2007, found that daylight time has a significant impact on the number of pedestrians killed by vehicles in the immediate aftermath of the time switch in the fall. People walking during rush hour in the first few weeks after the clocks fall back in the autumn were more than three times more likely to be fatally struck by cars than before the change.  And this can impact the luckless cyclist as well, so be aware of whats happening in front of you as well as alongside of you, the best that you can!

Then there is the weather to consider. Getting caught in a light rain in August can almost be pleasant, but it's no fun in November, and even worse in January or February when those temperatures really take a plunge. When cycling this time of the year, you need to be prepared, (like a Boy Scout) it’s a good idea to keep a scarf, hat and gloves, with you in a saddle pouch or knapsack (waterproof), just in case the ones you’re wearing get wet or frosted.

Another good item to have with you is a "a rain poncho and waterproof carrying bag. After all, the idea is to keep yourself dry, not have to put on slightly damp clothes from a non-waterproof bag, right?

Rainy windshields on cars, combined with earlier darkness make bicyclists and pedestrians even harder to see. Wearing lighter-colored clothing, a reflective safety vest, sash or clothing that reflects cars headlights are an important part of your fall/winter riding gear. And remember, always using lights, in proper working condition will keep you visible, to those sharing the road with you!

Another thing to keep in mind is that leaves are slippery when wet! And you don't know what's under them. It’s a good idea that you avoid them when possible, which is hard when you are sharing the road with cars, or you're on that mountain path and the leaves are the only thing your seeing on the trail. So slow down, and be really careful when navigating those turns.

But, again, the purpose of this post is to just get you out there enjoying what you like about the sport of cycling. If you’re lucky enough to live in parts of the country that constantly go through a seasonable cycle, then you know that the Fall and early Winter season can offer some great vistas for you to enjoy as you travel down those frosty paths. Enjoy, Enjoy the Great Outdoors.
From your cycling buddies here at HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com

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Just Make Sure The Leaves Are The Only Thing That Is Falling!

Yes, the sun is rising a little later now that Fall is upon us. And the weather begins to move from warm and humid to cool and clean with a morning breeze to help chase those cobwebs from your brain. But with this change comes the opportunity to experience a feeling of embracing this change and maybe get out on some trails that you put off till now because you knew the terrain is a little more taxing and you wanted to put it off until a cooler time of year.

With the anticipation of getting out this time of year you need to and want to have the necessary tools on hand in order to make sure you’re going in the right direction, especially if you're going to be taking some new trails to enjoy the autumn season.

One good tool to have with you now and really any time of year is a good cycling computer, with an accurate GPS function to plot where you are against where you want to end up being. One that fits the bill is the Garmin Edge 1030 GPS Cycling Computer . Besides having preloaded maps, targeted on where you are, it also has the newest “Rider-to-Rider” messaging and Group-Track functions to help you stay aware and communicate with your buddies as you go. Edge 1030 is compatible with Varia rearview radar and smart bike lights, and it has built-in incident detection to help create a safer riding environment.

But with this change in the weather and the surroundings around you. You also need to prepare both you and your bike for things that go hand in hand with the Fall season.

One thing that a lot of people neglect to do this time of year is to check their tire pressure. After all, tire pressure varies with the changes in the temperature and with your tires being in direct contact with that cold hard road, the temps can make a difference with the air in your tires. A good rule of thumb is “Tire pressure can change with fluctuations in temperature. One example to use when comparing tire pressure to air temperature is for every 10 degrees F, tire pressure will adjust by 1 psi. For example, if the outside air temperature increases 10 degrees, the tire pressure will increase by 1 psi”.

That’s about as easy as I can make it. But you need to be aware of the fact that you should be checking that tire pressure on a regular basis and as the fall season moves into the colder winter months it should become a regular routine for you to make sure the tire pressure corresponds to the temperature changes. After all, there are and will be plenty of nice days in December, January and even February that you can get out there and enjoy the changes in the scenery that Mother Nature provides us with!

The Fall Season also brings shorter daylight hours along with grey days and rainy weather with it. Which means you should have your lights checked as well as that tire pressure. And it’s not a bad idea to get into the habit of checking both at the same time. This way you won’t have any surprises as you flick that switch and instead of seeing a nice bright beam of light, all you get is a tired, dim projection of gloom.

You want to make sure those batteries are at full strength. With that being said, lights are very important this time of year as we just mentioned. A great name in bike lighting is Varia. And two great lights that work in tandem with the Garmin 1030 are the Varia Smart Bike Lights for “Frontal Lighting” and the Garmin Varia Rearview Radar Tail Light . They both can work independently and they seamlessly integrate with the compatible Edge® cycling computers, the model 1030 that I mentioned above.

As a rider’s speed increases, the headlight automatically projects further ahead or closer, as a rider’s speed decreases when paired with select Edge computers.

As light conditions change, the smart Varia headlights and tail lights automatically get brighter or dimmer, so they are a great pairing of products that work when you need them to.

In the summer most cyclists are rarely caught out in the dark but in fall, particularly after the time changes, it can happen more often than not. Another simple rule that most of us forget is that if you are cycling west at sundown, the sun is in everyone's eyes and it can be very hard to see. For both you and those who may be sharing the road with you!

One other thing to keep in mind, as a helpful reminder is that you should be really careful on the few days after November 1st when the clocks roll back. This usually happens in the early part of the month. But regions of the country fluctuate so know when it happens in the area in which you cycle. Studies have shown a significant increase in the number of accidents immediately after the change because people are tired and they are not used to the conditions.

According to the CBC: A study, by two researchers at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh in 2007, found that daylight time has a significant impact on the number of pedestrians killed by vehicles in the immediate aftermath of the time switch in the fall. People walking during rush hour in the first few weeks after the clocks fall back in the autumn were more than three times more likely to be fatally struck by cars than before the change.  And this can impact the luckless cyclist as well, so be aware of whats happening in front of you as well as alongside of you, the best that you can!

Then there is the weather to consider. Getting caught in a light rain in August can almost be pleasant, but it's no fun in November, and even worse in January or February when those temperatures really take a plunge. When cycling this time of the year, you need to be prepared, (like a Boy Scout) it’s a good idea to keep a scarf, hat and gloves, with you in a saddle pouch or knapsack (waterproof), just in case the ones you’re wearing get wet or frosted.

Another good item to have with you is a "a rain poncho and waterproof carrying bag. After all, the idea is to keep yourself dry, not have to put on slightly damp clothes from a non-waterproof bag, right?

Rainy windshields on cars, combined with earlier darkness make bicyclists and pedestrians even harder to see. Wearing lighter-colored clothing, a reflective safety vest, sash or clothing that reflects cars headlights are an important part of your fall/winter riding gear. And remember, always using lights, in proper working condition will keep you visible, to those sharing the road with you!

Another thing to keep in mind is that leaves are slippery when wet! And you don't know what's under them. It’s a good idea that you avoid them when possible, which is hard when you are sharing the road with cars, or you're on that mountain path and the leaves are the only thing your seeing on the trail. So slow down, and be really careful when navigating those turns.

But, again, the purpose of this post is to just get you out there enjoying what you like about the sport of cycling. If you’re lucky enough to live in parts of the country that constantly go through a seasonable cycle, then you know that the Fall and early Winter season can offer some great vistas for you to enjoy as you travel down those frosty paths. Enjoy, Enjoy the Great Outdoors.
From your cycling buddies here at HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com

Read more