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Beginning A Running/Fitness Program in 2019? We’ve Got the Tracker For You!

Yes, 2019 is just a few weeks old and you made the commitment to get more physical for the New Year. Maybe the goal is to get in better, healthier shape, or lose some of that extra baggage you’ve been carrying around for a few years. In order to accomplish this, you’ve decided to put one foot in front of the other, at a quick pace by taking up running. Well, Good for You! But, do you know what you're getting yourself into?

Running is a sport, just like any other sport that you may watch on tv. But running is a personal, individual, one that basically pits you against yourself. Every time you lace up your shoes, you're going to be competing against your last time out, the distance you ran, how long it took you, how well you ended up. It’s all about how well your body is performing this time out, against the last time you set off, out the door.

Like any new endeavor that you want to commit to, you need to really commit to it! It must become a habit to you, a part of your life, that if you don’t do it, you’re going to have that nagging feeling hanging around you for the day, knowing that you missed your appointed time slot and that somehow you need to make it up!

Starting a new habit of any kind is hard, especially when it’s one you kind of dread can be a little scary. But the trick is, don’t go all in at the start and swear you’ll run six days a week if you’ve barely run before. Create a schedule and stick to it. Another specific that can set you up for failure is don't set unrealistic or hard to attain goals when starting out! This again is just going to set yourself up for failure. You can get to your ultimate goal, but you need to pace yourself and gradually build up your body's stamina and endurance to help you to get there and reach those goals. Most people that take up a running regimen fail because that want to reach that 5-mile mark without breaking a sweat.

First things first, running is probably one of the easier, more cost-effective sports to take up. After all, you basically just need a good, comfortable, while a supportive pair of running shoes. The outfits can come later but you need good running shoes to start, not a fashionable running outfit so you look good out on the road or trail!

The most surefire way to get the right shoes is to head to your local specialty running shop. They’ll put you on a treadmill and analyze your stride to match the right fit and style with how you naturally run. Listen to them, again, color and style do not mean a thing if you’re not wearing a supportive pair of shoes that can go the distance with you so that you’re not injuring your feet when your pounding that pavement, or mountain trail, if that’s the type of running you’re going to be doing. And if you are, then make sure you tell the shoe specialists that so they can fit you with the right terrain shoes for your run.

Remember up above we talked about goal setting? One of the best ways to keep you honest in making sure you really are attaining those preset goals of your is to track them. In order to track them, you need to monitor your daily runs and the best way to do that is with a good, reliable GPS enabled smartwatch/activity tracker. As the saying goes, the only person you should try to be better than is the person you were yesterday. Now with technology getting better every day, you can measure this for real.

One brand of GPS watches that I like is from Garmin, and their slogan really sums up what I mentioned above. Their slogan is "Beat Yesterday" which with a personal sport like running, that’s really what it’s all about, right? Some GPS watches save your previous times for routes and workouts, giving you the chance to race a previous you. This way you can clearly see your improvements and get motivated to push yourself that little bit harder on every run.

A good beginner running watch that fits this to a "T" is the Garmin Forerunner 35 GPS Watch. Which is a simple, easy to use GPS watch that tracks your steps, calories burned, the intensity of your run and can upload this data to an online community with its free app called Garmin Connect. With the aid of which you can summarily track your progress and if so, inclined can share this data with your running friends and see how you're doing against others. Which provides you with a little more of a competition against others instead of just against yourself. Which sometimes can be a great motivator to push yourself further, thus increasing your personal best! And unlike some other GPS watches, the Garmin Forerunner 35 also comes with a wrist-based heart rate monitor that monitors your heart rate without the need for a chest strap and lets you know just how well you're maintaining your heart rate rhythm while running and also at rest!

And the reliable GPS, which Garmin is known for quickly acquires satellites to track distance, speed, and location without requiring the use of your cell phone, so you have more portability without the need for a strong cell signal.

Keep in mind that you need to maintain a healthy diet, since your running, you’re going to need to eat the right amount of foods, some rich in carbs, fiber and of course protein. But knowing when to eat and what can be another topic for us to write about. Let’s just say you don’t want to eat a big meal before a run. A bagel, or a bowl of oatmeal, or a banana will do just fine. After all, you don’t want your body trying to digest a heavy amount of food when it should be working on breaking down what you’ve ingested into fuel, energy!

So, now that you have a few basics, go ahead and get those proper shoes, dress appropriately for the weather and strap on your Garmin Forerunner 35  and get out there and run!

 

Read more

Yes, 2019 is just a few weeks old and you made the commitment to get more physical for the New Year. Maybe the goal is to get in better, healthier shape, or lose some of that extra baggage you’ve been carrying around for a few years. In order to accomplish this, you’ve decided to put one foot in front of the other, at a quick pace by taking up running. Well, Good for You! But, do you know what you're getting yourself into?

Running is a sport, just like any other sport that you may watch on tv. But running is a personal, individual, one that basically pits you against yourself. Every time you lace up your shoes, you're going to be competing against your last time out, the distance you ran, how long it took you, how well you ended up. It’s all about how well your body is performing this time out, against the last time you set off, out the door.

Like any new endeavor that you want to commit to, you need to really commit to it! It must become a habit to you, a part of your life, that if you don’t do it, you’re going to have that nagging feeling hanging around you for the day, knowing that you missed your appointed time slot and that somehow you need to make it up!

Starting a new habit of any kind is hard, especially when it’s one you kind of dread can be a little scary. But the trick is, don’t go all in at the start and swear you’ll run six days a week if you’ve barely run before. Create a schedule and stick to it. Another specific that can set you up for failure is don't set unrealistic or hard to attain goals when starting out! This again is just going to set yourself up for failure. You can get to your ultimate goal, but you need to pace yourself and gradually build up your body's stamina and endurance to help you to get there and reach those goals. Most people that take up a running regimen fail because that want to reach that 5-mile mark without breaking a sweat.

First things first, running is probably one of the easier, more cost-effective sports to take up. After all, you basically just need a good, comfortable, while a supportive pair of running shoes. The outfits can come later but you need good running shoes to start, not a fashionable running outfit so you look good out on the road or trail!

The most surefire way to get the right shoes is to head to your local specialty running shop. They’ll put you on a treadmill and analyze your stride to match the right fit and style with how you naturally run. Listen to them, again, color and style do not mean a thing if you’re not wearing a supportive pair of shoes that can go the distance with you so that you’re not injuring your feet when your pounding that pavement, or mountain trail, if that’s the type of running you’re going to be doing. And if you are, then make sure you tell the shoe specialists that so they can fit you with the right terrain shoes for your run.

Remember up above we talked about goal setting? One of the best ways to keep you honest in making sure you really are attaining those preset goals of your is to track them. In order to track them, you need to monitor your daily runs and the best way to do that is with a good, reliable GPS enabled smartwatch/activity tracker. As the saying goes, the only person you should try to be better than is the person you were yesterday. Now with technology getting better every day, you can measure this for real.

One brand of GPS watches that I like is from Garmin, and their slogan really sums up what I mentioned above. Their slogan is "Beat Yesterday" which with a personal sport like running, that’s really what it’s all about, right? Some GPS watches save your previous times for routes and workouts, giving you the chance to race a previous you. This way you can clearly see your improvements and get motivated to push yourself that little bit harder on every run.

A good beginner running watch that fits this to a "T" is the Garmin Forerunner 35 GPS Watch. Which is a simple, easy to use GPS watch that tracks your steps, calories burned, the intensity of your run and can upload this data to an online community with its free app called Garmin Connect. With the aid of which you can summarily track your progress and if so, inclined can share this data with your running friends and see how you're doing against others. Which provides you with a little more of a competition against others instead of just against yourself. Which sometimes can be a great motivator to push yourself further, thus increasing your personal best! And unlike some other GPS watches, the Garmin Forerunner 35 also comes with a wrist-based heart rate monitor that monitors your heart rate without the need for a chest strap and lets you know just how well you're maintaining your heart rate rhythm while running and also at rest!

And the reliable GPS, which Garmin is known for quickly acquires satellites to track distance, speed, and location without requiring the use of your cell phone, so you have more portability without the need for a strong cell signal.

Keep in mind that you need to maintain a healthy diet, since your running, you’re going to need to eat the right amount of foods, some rich in carbs, fiber and of course protein. But knowing when to eat and what can be another topic for us to write about. Let’s just say you don’t want to eat a big meal before a run. A bagel, or a bowl of oatmeal, or a banana will do just fine. After all, you don’t want your body trying to digest a heavy amount of food when it should be working on breaking down what you’ve ingested into fuel, energy!

So, now that you have a few basics, go ahead and get those proper shoes, dress appropriately for the weather and strap on your Garmin Forerunner 35  and get out there and run!

 

Read more

Sometimes Old Is New Again, Especially In A Fitness Watch Like the Garmin Forerunner 235!

We live in a society that is obsessed with having the latest and greatest of just about everything. From the latest iPhone, regardless of the cost. I’m no judge but I may think more than twice or three times before shelling out a grand for a phone that when you get past all the bells and whistles, we ALL started off just looking into getting something that we could make just make calls with right?

The same can be said for our cars, whether it’s a Sedan, SUV, or Truck. They can do just about everything from parking themselves into a hard to get into parking space (whatever happened to practicing a “K” turn in order to pass a driving’s test)?.

And the same is happening to our fitness trackers as well. Now, don’t get me wrong. Technology is a great thing. It’s taken us from a static world to one that just about any kind of information is available to us within virtually seconds, or Nanoseconds (What’s a Nano? :)). Fitness watches have come such a long way from just telling time and tracking our steps and the calories burned, like a fancy pedometer. Now, you can track your VO2 levels, your target heart performance zones, even your stress levels, that may go up and down depending on whether your boss, significant other is on your case again.

Let’s face it, these days we expect running/activity watches to be more than distance and pace trackers. Increasingly, we want them to coach us too, with insights on how to improve form and train smarter.

It’s why the latest devices offer ever-more-detailed running dynamics, heart rate analysis and training feedback. It’s why you’d also think that a watch launched more than two years ago might struggle to keep up. But, not so dear reader. Let's take a look at the Garmin Forerunner 235 . Let’s be clear, there are more watches out there that are loaded with the latest and greatest that technology can offer, Garmin Forerunner 645 for a start, which means the 235 isn’t even close to the latest Garmin watch money can buy, but before you click away in a fit of I gotta have the latest and greatest fitness watch out there, it’s worth giving the Forerunner 235 a closer look, because this is a powerful watch with a lot going for it. Not the least its price!

Because of the Forerunner 235’s has been around for a while, you can pick it up much cheaper than its original launch cost of about $329.99, based on various vendors pricing structure. It launched toward the end of 2015, so it's almost three years old now.

We’ve seen it drop below its original price for a while now, so if you’re looking for lots of run-tracking capability but on a budget, this pricing drop should make it a very attractive option.

Let's go back over the features of the Garmin Forerunner 235  Built-in GPS and Strapless Heart Rate, the Garmin Forerunner 235 is a must-have for any fitness person who is looking for valuable feedback during a run or post run or hardworking exercise routine.

GPS Running Watch with Wrist-based Heart Rate
Tracks distance, pace, time, heart rate and more
Connected features: automatic uploads to Garmin Connect, live tracking, audio prompts, smart notifications, and social media sharing
Activity tracking counts daily steps, distance, calories, and sleep
Download data fields, watch faces, widgets, and applications from Connect IQ
Crisp color screen
Comfortable silicone strap, which is also interchangeable

Sport watches are rarely stylish and though the Forerunner 235 is still unmistakably a Garmin, it’s among the better-looking run trackers you can buy. It comes in three color combinations: black and frost blue, black and red and black and grey, and there’s some smart subtlety to the latter two.

There’s a classic round-faced, 1.23-inch diameter color screen that’s crisp and easy to read in most light, with enough real estate to display up to four stats on two customizable screens.

No touch screen but you get five side buttons to navigate your way through Garmin’s relatively simple menus.

The perforated soft silicone strap makes for a more comfortable, less sweaty run, particularly useful over longer distances and considering you’ll need to wear this a little tighter on the wrist to get the best accuracy from the built-in optical heart rate sensor.

The buttons are responsive and easy enough to use on the move though and the whole thing weighs in at just 42g, which makes it one of the lighter watches you can strap on.

Forerunner 235 Heart rate:
Useful 24/7 heart rate tracking
VO2 Max scores

The Garmin Forerunner 235 tracks heart rate (HR) from the wrist, though you can also pair ANT+ chest straps if you prefer the high-accuracy this brings.

This tracker was one of the earlier devices to embrace the Mio optical heart rate sensors in favor of Garmin Elevate sensor technology.

Compare the 235 against the Polar M430 over a range of tests, including a marathon distance run.

The devices performed fairly consistently. Garmin clocked the average HR at 154bpm and Max HR at 179bpm while the Polar M430 registered a 154bpm average but a Max HR of 172bpm. Anecdotally during the run the Polar seemed to run at 3-4bpm lower than the Garmin.
Both devices offer resting heart rate (RHR) tracking and when we came to compare them, both gave identical readings but the way Garmin highlights this hugely useful benchmark for health and fitness is much better.

In fact, the continuous 24/7 heart rate tracking on the Forerunner 235 is one of the best we’ve seen for monitoring your progress and spotting things like potential over-training and incoming colds.

With the touch of a button you get a read out of your current heart rate, highs and lows, your average RHR and a visual showing the last 4 hours. You can then tap for a chart of your RHR over the last 7 days.

Resting heart rate high that morning? That’s a sign you might want to skip a training session or ease off the intensity, and the Forerunner 235 makes that a much easier decision. This is definitely an added bonus when seeing a potential problem that you can alert a physician too, if it becomes a regular occurrence!

Run tracking and running metrics:
GPS locks on quickly
Accuracy seems reasonable
There are four sports modes: Run, Run Indoor, Cycle and Other, and it’s really useful that you can customize two data screens with up to four fields to create your own preferred displays for each of these.

Indoor runs are tracked by the onboard accelerometer while GLONASS and GPS provide the usual outdoor pace, distance and speed metrics. In our treadmill test, the Garmin was within 5% on total distance, though unsurprisingly the pacing rarely matched the treadmills.

Outdoors we consistently see a rapid GPS fix, though when it came to accuracy there were some question marks. For example, on our marathon test, running an officially measured course, the Forerunner 235 clocked our distance at 41.96km, short of the 42.195km. But again, stacked up against watches of a far greater price range, this was within an acceptable level.

In addition to distance, time, pace and calories, during your run, or rigorous exercise routines like HITT or CrossFit training, you can also see cadence, heart rate, and heart rate zone and there are customizable audio and vibrating alerts to help guide you on target pace and heart rate.

You can store up to 200 hours of activity on the watch itself giving you plenty of data should you wish to dig for insights from your past runs or fitness routines from the wrist, though with instant updates via your smartphone’s Bluetooth to Garmin Connect you might not need that.

How Active You Are:
Tracks your steps and distance all day
Shows how active you've been at a glance
The Forerunner 235 isn’t just a running watch, it’s also a comprehensive activity tracker that learns your daily patterns and automatically sets your step goals to strive for.

The main screen features an inactivity bar that creeps around the watch face when you’re on your backside, plus the accelerometer will keep tabs on your overall step count and distance covered during the day. All of which you can access with two taps of the left-hand arrow button to take you to a display.


Battery life and charging
Enough battery to last an average week!
The proprietary charger like all other Garmins
When it comes to endurance, Garmin claims the Forerunner 235 can last up to 9 days in watch mode and up to 11 hours in GPS mode with the heart rate monitor in use.

It was tested over a normal training week starting on Sunday with a long 1.5-hour run, with three short midweek runs of up to an hour and then normal daily usage in between. It performed well and did all we expected it to do, then we put it back on the charging dock before the following week’s Sunday run.

We also tried it out on a marathon, taking it off the dock at 6.30am on race day. It had no trouble tracking a 4-hour marathon and made it through to Wednesday with normal activity tracking and smartphone notifications on before it finally died. It’s more than capable of coping with an average training week, and it could potentially handle a 100km ultra for faster runners.

Bottom Line:
The Garmin Forerunner 235 delivers enough training insights to satisfy runners at most levels, right up to those shooting for personal bests at the faster end of the pack.

It’s a great tool for those who take performance at least semi-seriously more than casual fitness enthusiasts, as there are cheaper options for those who really only want to know how far, fast and hard they’ve worked.

The 11-hour battery life could potentially make it suitable for faster ultra-runners tackling runs up to 100km, but its skills are more suited to tarmac than the trail.

The Forerunner 235 has carried itself well during the past 3 years. This is a great running tool that’s still very competitive. In fact, if you don’t care about some of the more complex running dynamics we’re seeing offered on newer models, then this should definitely be the one you should consider strapping on your own wrist.

Read more

We live in a society that is obsessed with having the latest and greatest of just about everything. From the latest iPhone, regardless of the cost. I’m no judge but I may think more than twice or three times before shelling out a grand for a phone that when you get past all the bells and whistles, we ALL started off just looking into getting something that we could make just make calls with right?

The same can be said for our cars, whether it’s a Sedan, SUV, or Truck. They can do just about everything from parking themselves into a hard to get into parking space (whatever happened to practicing a “K” turn in order to pass a driving’s test)?.

And the same is happening to our fitness trackers as well. Now, don’t get me wrong. Technology is a great thing. It’s taken us from a static world to one that just about any kind of information is available to us within virtually seconds, or Nanoseconds (What’s a Nano? :)). Fitness watches have come such a long way from just telling time and tracking our steps and the calories burned, like a fancy pedometer. Now, you can track your VO2 levels, your target heart performance zones, even your stress levels, that may go up and down depending on whether your boss, significant other is on your case again.

Let’s face it, these days we expect running/activity watches to be more than distance and pace trackers. Increasingly, we want them to coach us too, with insights on how to improve form and train smarter.

It’s why the latest devices offer ever-more-detailed running dynamics, heart rate analysis and training feedback. It’s why you’d also think that a watch launched more than two years ago might struggle to keep up. But, not so dear reader. Let's take a look at the Garmin Forerunner 235 . Let’s be clear, there are more watches out there that are loaded with the latest and greatest that technology can offer, Garmin Forerunner 645 for a start, which means the 235 isn’t even close to the latest Garmin watch money can buy, but before you click away in a fit of I gotta have the latest and greatest fitness watch out there, it’s worth giving the Forerunner 235 a closer look, because this is a powerful watch with a lot going for it. Not the least its price!

Because of the Forerunner 235’s has been around for a while, you can pick it up much cheaper than its original launch cost of about $329.99, based on various vendors pricing structure. It launched toward the end of 2015, so it's almost three years old now.

We’ve seen it drop below its original price for a while now, so if you’re looking for lots of run-tracking capability but on a budget, this pricing drop should make it a very attractive option.

Let's go back over the features of the Garmin Forerunner 235  Built-in GPS and Strapless Heart Rate, the Garmin Forerunner 235 is a must-have for any fitness person who is looking for valuable feedback during a run or post run or hardworking exercise routine.

GPS Running Watch with Wrist-based Heart Rate
Tracks distance, pace, time, heart rate and more
Connected features: automatic uploads to Garmin Connect, live tracking, audio prompts, smart notifications, and social media sharing
Activity tracking counts daily steps, distance, calories, and sleep
Download data fields, watch faces, widgets, and applications from Connect IQ
Crisp color screen
Comfortable silicone strap, which is also interchangeable

Sport watches are rarely stylish and though the Forerunner 235 is still unmistakably a Garmin, it’s among the better-looking run trackers you can buy. It comes in three color combinations: black and frost blue, black and red and black and grey, and there’s some smart subtlety to the latter two.

There’s a classic round-faced, 1.23-inch diameter color screen that’s crisp and easy to read in most light, with enough real estate to display up to four stats on two customizable screens.

No touch screen but you get five side buttons to navigate your way through Garmin’s relatively simple menus.

The perforated soft silicone strap makes for a more comfortable, less sweaty run, particularly useful over longer distances and considering you’ll need to wear this a little tighter on the wrist to get the best accuracy from the built-in optical heart rate sensor.

The buttons are responsive and easy enough to use on the move though and the whole thing weighs in at just 42g, which makes it one of the lighter watches you can strap on.

Forerunner 235 Heart rate:
Useful 24/7 heart rate tracking
VO2 Max scores

The Garmin Forerunner 235 tracks heart rate (HR) from the wrist, though you can also pair ANT+ chest straps if you prefer the high-accuracy this brings.

This tracker was one of the earlier devices to embrace the Mio optical heart rate sensors in favor of Garmin Elevate sensor technology.

Compare the 235 against the Polar M430 over a range of tests, including a marathon distance run.

The devices performed fairly consistently. Garmin clocked the average HR at 154bpm and Max HR at 179bpm while the Polar M430 registered a 154bpm average but a Max HR of 172bpm. Anecdotally during the run the Polar seemed to run at 3-4bpm lower than the Garmin.
Both devices offer resting heart rate (RHR) tracking and when we came to compare them, both gave identical readings but the way Garmin highlights this hugely useful benchmark for health and fitness is much better.

In fact, the continuous 24/7 heart rate tracking on the Forerunner 235 is one of the best we’ve seen for monitoring your progress and spotting things like potential over-training and incoming colds.

With the touch of a button you get a read out of your current heart rate, highs and lows, your average RHR and a visual showing the last 4 hours. You can then tap for a chart of your RHR over the last 7 days.

Resting heart rate high that morning? That’s a sign you might want to skip a training session or ease off the intensity, and the Forerunner 235 makes that a much easier decision. This is definitely an added bonus when seeing a potential problem that you can alert a physician too, if it becomes a regular occurrence!

Run tracking and running metrics:
GPS locks on quickly
Accuracy seems reasonable
There are four sports modes: Run, Run Indoor, Cycle and Other, and it’s really useful that you can customize two data screens with up to four fields to create your own preferred displays for each of these.

Indoor runs are tracked by the onboard accelerometer while GLONASS and GPS provide the usual outdoor pace, distance and speed metrics. In our treadmill test, the Garmin was within 5% on total distance, though unsurprisingly the pacing rarely matched the treadmills.

Outdoors we consistently see a rapid GPS fix, though when it came to accuracy there were some question marks. For example, on our marathon test, running an officially measured course, the Forerunner 235 clocked our distance at 41.96km, short of the 42.195km. But again, stacked up against watches of a far greater price range, this was within an acceptable level.

In addition to distance, time, pace and calories, during your run, or rigorous exercise routines like HITT or CrossFit training, you can also see cadence, heart rate, and heart rate zone and there are customizable audio and vibrating alerts to help guide you on target pace and heart rate.

You can store up to 200 hours of activity on the watch itself giving you plenty of data should you wish to dig for insights from your past runs or fitness routines from the wrist, though with instant updates via your smartphone’s Bluetooth to Garmin Connect you might not need that.

How Active You Are:
Tracks your steps and distance all day
Shows how active you've been at a glance
The Forerunner 235 isn’t just a running watch, it’s also a comprehensive activity tracker that learns your daily patterns and automatically sets your step goals to strive for.

The main screen features an inactivity bar that creeps around the watch face when you’re on your backside, plus the accelerometer will keep tabs on your overall step count and distance covered during the day. All of which you can access with two taps of the left-hand arrow button to take you to a display.


Battery life and charging
Enough battery to last an average week!
The proprietary charger like all other Garmins
When it comes to endurance, Garmin claims the Forerunner 235 can last up to 9 days in watch mode and up to 11 hours in GPS mode with the heart rate monitor in use.

It was tested over a normal training week starting on Sunday with a long 1.5-hour run, with three short midweek runs of up to an hour and then normal daily usage in between. It performed well and did all we expected it to do, then we put it back on the charging dock before the following week’s Sunday run.

We also tried it out on a marathon, taking it off the dock at 6.30am on race day. It had no trouble tracking a 4-hour marathon and made it through to Wednesday with normal activity tracking and smartphone notifications on before it finally died. It’s more than capable of coping with an average training week, and it could potentially handle a 100km ultra for faster runners.

Bottom Line:
The Garmin Forerunner 235 delivers enough training insights to satisfy runners at most levels, right up to those shooting for personal bests at the faster end of the pack.

It’s a great tool for those who take performance at least semi-seriously more than casual fitness enthusiasts, as there are cheaper options for those who really only want to know how far, fast and hard they’ve worked.

The 11-hour battery life could potentially make it suitable for faster ultra-runners tackling runs up to 100km, but its skills are more suited to tarmac than the trail.

The Forerunner 235 has carried itself well during the past 3 years. This is a great running tool that’s still very competitive. In fact, if you don’t care about some of the more complex running dynamics we’re seeing offered on newer models, then this should definitely be the one you should consider strapping on your own wrist.

Read more

Want A High-Quality Fitness Watch That Stands Up To Everyday Wear And Tear?

Knowing which one to get shouldn’t be “Rocket Science” it should be more along “Instinct” (Get It?). Well you should, it’s a new rugged fitness tracker, GPS enabled that has a more than tough design that can take the worst your that your day can throw at it. The Garmin Instinct Rugged GPS Watch with Glonass !

This rugged and reliable GPS watch is designed for those exploring and working in the great outdoors. It features key sensors and exceptional navigation technology, so you’ll never lose your bearings when you’re heading off known trails, whether it’s running them, biking them or just plain hiking them! It also offers key information about your sleep, the number of steps, heart rate, intensity minutes and stress in everyday life to keep you on track when you’re back on the beaten path.

Remember we said rugged? Well, this watch is made to take the abuse of outdoor recreation that some of your fancy designed display watches would be licking their wounds from. After all, do you really enjoy seeing scratches across your watches’ display area, or your watchband getting torn from being hung up on a branch that’s sticking out on a trail? Especially if you paid, $400.00, $500.00 or more for it?

Well, with the Garmin Instinct, you won’t have to worry, with its “Fiber-Reinforced-Polymer” case it adds strength and durability to the design, and the chemically-strengthened, scratch-resistant display is high-contrast enough to read in bright sunlight. Just what you need when you’re out in the sunshine, heading up that mountain trail. This watch gives you everything you need without the bells and whistles that drive up cost on many advanced lifestyle watches.

Despite its ruggedness and a long list of features, the Garmin Instinct weighs only 1.8 oz. So you won't mind it on your wrist during the day and as you sleep at night. Instinct’s display is about 45 by 45 by 15.3 mm.

The Garmin Instinct carries a water rating of 10 ATM, meaning it can withstand pressures equivalent to being 100 meters underwater. This smartwatch received the MIL-STD-810G standard, meaning Garmin Instinct met the military standard for thermal, shock and water performance. We did say it was rugged, right?

The Garmin Instinct comes in three colors: Graphite, Tundra, and Flame-Red, with an integrated band, sized at 132 mm to 224 So you won't have any problem with a too loose or too tight band to make you uncomfortable.

The monochrome screen, one of its "Best" features, is visible in all lighting conditions, including intense sunlight, with a mini-overlay for additional information.

As for battery life, Instinct can last up to 14 days in smartwatch mode, up to 16 hours with the GPS mode on and up to 40 hours on Ultra-Trac battery save mode.

Besides the “Outdoors” rugged life, the Garmin Instinct  also tracks everyday activities and adventures. No matter how you stay fit or spend your fun time, the Garmin Instinct has a sports mode just for you. Everything from a simple walk to a snowboarding. This watch is an even bet that it has a "sports mode" that fits your lifestyle, 28 sport-mode options for active lifestyles, at that. It even includes a mode for boaters by providing information including distance, time and average nautical speed.

Grab your gear and your new best companion, the Garmin Instinct to get feedback on performance that helps you reach your sporting goals.

Sports Modes: And in case your interested, listed below are the sports modes that your Garmin Instinct will provide you with all the necessary data in order for you to meet and exceed your physical training goals.
Pool swim
Open water swim
Trail Running
Regular Running
Cycling
Mountain biking
Standup paddleboard
Walking
Treadmill
Indoor track
Hike
Climb
Indoor cycling
Ski
Snowboard
Cross country ski
Kayak
Row
Rowing
Strength training
Cardio
Yoga
Elliptical
Stair stepper
Floor climber
Tactical running
Boating

Breadcrumbs: Remember the fairy tale, Hansel and Gretel? They intended to follow the trail of breadcrumbs back to their home, but those pesky birds ate them, and they became lost in the woods. The rest is a story that you can follow up with on your own time. Getting back to the breadcrumbs. The Garmin Instinct provides you with a “Breadcrumb” trail that will get you back to where you started your trek out in those wide open spaces, This feature is especially handy for hiking, mountain biking, anywhere you're more likely to go that probably won’t have cell phone reception.

Save Locations: is another feature that'll come in handy for Garmin users. This feature marks the location from the controls menu and adds it to the list so you can navigate to it from the Navigation menu. Saved Locations can be used for planning and navigating purposes.

The Garmin Instinct also has a “Find My Phone and Find My Device” features so if you, for whatever reason, have trouble finding your smartwatch, you can use your smartphone to request an audible tone from the Garmin Instinct to help find it. You can also use the watch to find your smartphone as the Garmin Instinct can force the phone to ring via the Garmin Connect app to help you find it – even if it is on silent!

The Garmin Instinct  helps you get from point A to point B with these other navigation features:

Saved location – Beneficial for everything from saving where you parked to finding your way back to the beginning of a trail.
Sight‘n Go – Allows the user to point the device at an object in the distance such as a water tower, lock in the direction and then navigate to the object.
Coordinates – Allows you to enter the latitude and longitude of a location and name it.

Now, remember, the Garmin Instinct, despite everything else, it is an Activity Tracker!
Features like advanced sleep monitoring, number of steps, 24-hour heart rate, intensity minutes and stress tracking are as important in the city as they are in the country.

Other Features Include:
Calendar
Calories (both resting and active)
Weather and temperature
Smart notifications for phone calls, alerts, etc.
Altimeter
Compass
Barometer

The Garmin Instinct uses the “Elevate” wrist heart rate technology, which monitors changes in blood flow by shining light through the skin. With Garmin's Elevate technology, you can ditch the chest strap or other types of equipment used to measure your heart rate during your workouts. You just DON’T need it!

Garmin's All-day stress tracking feature measures your heart rate and then uses that data to reveal when your body is experiencing stress and when you are at rest and recovering. This stress-tracking feature will allow you to see how your body copes with day-to-day stresses. This tool gives a user an opportunity to observe whether the lifestyle/training changes they make are helping to change stress levels.

The smartwatch also offers the Live-Track feature that allows users to share their workout results in real-time. Once you install the Garmin Connect app on your smartphone, you can share your timed activities with your friends and family via email or social media. You can also share your heart rate or cadence from your Live-Track page as well.

And since this watch is made to go and work with you for long periods of time, it needs to have the "Juice" in order to perform the way Garmin and you need it to.
Battery life: Up to 14 days in smartwatch mode, Up to 16 hours in GPS mode, up to 40 hours in UltraTrac™ battery saver mode. So, even without a portable charging device, the Instinct probably has the "Go-Go-Juice" to take you there and back again. Sounds like the title of a book, right?

Well, go ahead and start making your own stories about how far you've traveled and how well your body's doing, after all, you have all the data you need in order to keep on keeping on.

Remember, you can TRUST your Instinct  (Smart Watch) from Garmin… Just saying.


Read more
Knowing which one to get shouldn’t be “Rocket Science” it should be more along “Instinct” (Get It?). Well you should, it’s a new rugged fitness tracker, GPS enabled that has a more than tough design that can take the worst your that your day can throw at it. The Garmin Instinct Rugged GPS Watch with Glonass !

This rugged and reliable GPS watch is designed for those exploring and working in the great outdoors. It features key sensors and exceptional navigation technology, so you’ll never lose your bearings when you’re heading off known trails, whether it’s running them, biking them or just plain hiking them! It also offers key information about your sleep, the number of steps, heart rate, intensity minutes and stress in everyday life to keep you on track when you’re back on the beaten path.

Remember we said rugged? Well, this watch is made to take the abuse of outdoor recreation that some of your fancy designed display watches would be licking their wounds from. After all, do you really enjoy seeing scratches across your watches’ display area, or your watchband getting torn from being hung up on a branch that’s sticking out on a trail? Especially if you paid, $400.00, $500.00 or more for it?

Well, with the Garmin Instinct, you won’t have to worry, with its “Fiber-Reinforced-Polymer” case it adds strength and durability to the design, and the chemically-strengthened, scratch-resistant display is high-contrast enough to read in bright sunlight. Just what you need when you’re out in the sunshine, heading up that mountain trail. This watch gives you everything you need without the bells and whistles that drive up cost on many advanced lifestyle watches.

Despite its ruggedness and a long list of features, the Garmin Instinct weighs only 1.8 oz. So you won't mind it on your wrist during the day and as you sleep at night. Instinct’s display is about 45 by 45 by 15.3 mm.

The Garmin Instinct carries a water rating of 10 ATM, meaning it can withstand pressures equivalent to being 100 meters underwater. This smartwatch received the MIL-STD-810G standard, meaning Garmin Instinct met the military standard for thermal, shock and water performance. We did say it was rugged, right?

The Garmin Instinct comes in three colors: Graphite, Tundra, and Flame-Red, with an integrated band, sized at 132 mm to 224 So you won't have any problem with a too loose or too tight band to make you uncomfortable.

The monochrome screen, one of its "Best" features, is visible in all lighting conditions, including intense sunlight, with a mini-overlay for additional information.

As for battery life, Instinct can last up to 14 days in smartwatch mode, up to 16 hours with the GPS mode on and up to 40 hours on Ultra-Trac battery save mode.

Besides the “Outdoors” rugged life, the Garmin Instinct  also tracks everyday activities and adventures. No matter how you stay fit or spend your fun time, the Garmin Instinct has a sports mode just for you. Everything from a simple walk to a snowboarding. This watch is an even bet that it has a "sports mode" that fits your lifestyle, 28 sport-mode options for active lifestyles, at that. It even includes a mode for boaters by providing information including distance, time and average nautical speed.

Grab your gear and your new best companion, the Garmin Instinct to get feedback on performance that helps you reach your sporting goals.

Sports Modes: And in case your interested, listed below are the sports modes that your Garmin Instinct will provide you with all the necessary data in order for you to meet and exceed your physical training goals.
Pool swim
Open water swim
Trail Running
Regular Running
Cycling
Mountain biking
Standup paddleboard
Walking
Treadmill
Indoor track
Hike
Climb
Indoor cycling
Ski
Snowboard
Cross country ski
Kayak
Row
Rowing
Strength training
Cardio
Yoga
Elliptical
Stair stepper
Floor climber
Tactical running
Boating

Breadcrumbs: Remember the fairy tale, Hansel and Gretel? They intended to follow the trail of breadcrumbs back to their home, but those pesky birds ate them, and they became lost in the woods. The rest is a story that you can follow up with on your own time. Getting back to the breadcrumbs. The Garmin Instinct provides you with a “Breadcrumb” trail that will get you back to where you started your trek out in those wide open spaces, This feature is especially handy for hiking, mountain biking, anywhere you're more likely to go that probably won’t have cell phone reception.

Save Locations: is another feature that'll come in handy for Garmin users. This feature marks the location from the controls menu and adds it to the list so you can navigate to it from the Navigation menu. Saved Locations can be used for planning and navigating purposes.

The Garmin Instinct also has a “Find My Phone and Find My Device” features so if you, for whatever reason, have trouble finding your smartwatch, you can use your smartphone to request an audible tone from the Garmin Instinct to help find it. You can also use the watch to find your smartphone as the Garmin Instinct can force the phone to ring via the Garmin Connect app to help you find it – even if it is on silent!

The Garmin Instinct  helps you get from point A to point B with these other navigation features:

Saved location – Beneficial for everything from saving where you parked to finding your way back to the beginning of a trail.
Sight‘n Go – Allows the user to point the device at an object in the distance such as a water tower, lock in the direction and then navigate to the object.
Coordinates – Allows you to enter the latitude and longitude of a location and name it.

Now, remember, the Garmin Instinct, despite everything else, it is an Activity Tracker!
Features like advanced sleep monitoring, number of steps, 24-hour heart rate, intensity minutes and stress tracking are as important in the city as they are in the country.

Other Features Include:
Calendar
Calories (both resting and active)
Weather and temperature
Smart notifications for phone calls, alerts, etc.
Altimeter
Compass
Barometer

The Garmin Instinct uses the “Elevate” wrist heart rate technology, which monitors changes in blood flow by shining light through the skin. With Garmin's Elevate technology, you can ditch the chest strap or other types of equipment used to measure your heart rate during your workouts. You just DON’T need it!

Garmin's All-day stress tracking feature measures your heart rate and then uses that data to reveal when your body is experiencing stress and when you are at rest and recovering. This stress-tracking feature will allow you to see how your body copes with day-to-day stresses. This tool gives a user an opportunity to observe whether the lifestyle/training changes they make are helping to change stress levels.

The smartwatch also offers the Live-Track feature that allows users to share their workout results in real-time. Once you install the Garmin Connect app on your smartphone, you can share your timed activities with your friends and family via email or social media. You can also share your heart rate or cadence from your Live-Track page as well.

And since this watch is made to go and work with you for long periods of time, it needs to have the "Juice" in order to perform the way Garmin and you need it to.
Battery life: Up to 14 days in smartwatch mode, Up to 16 hours in GPS mode, up to 40 hours in UltraTrac™ battery saver mode. So, even without a portable charging device, the Instinct probably has the "Go-Go-Juice" to take you there and back again. Sounds like the title of a book, right?

Well, go ahead and start making your own stories about how far you've traveled and how well your body's doing, after all, you have all the data you need in order to keep on keeping on.

Remember, you can TRUST your Instinct  (Smart Watch) from Garmin… Just saying.


Read more

Does Your Game Stand Up To The Back 9?

In the summer we always look forward to great weather. After all, the sun comes up early and sets later so that our days are longer than at any time of the year. How we spend that time dictates what we talk about when the winter winds begin to blow, and that white, wet snow begins to fall. Some of us like to take advantage of the summer sun and head out to a sandy beach or secluded pond to do some swimming, fishing or just plain soaking up all that sunshine.

But there is that group of men and women that can't wait for the snow to melt away from their favorite golf course so that they can begin to shake the rust off of not only their clubs but also themselves after being forced to watch the reruns of championship golf matches on the golf channel.

If your one of these golf enthusiasts, then you know the only way to improve your game is to practice, practice and more practice. Working on your swing, your long drive, chipping and of course your putting. Nothing does more to help improve your game than becoming familiar with the lay of the land that makes up your course. The different contours the fairways have, the various obstacles that the designer of the course made sure that it's laid out, with enough of a challenge so that it tests your mettle and don’t forget the greens. The lay of the greens can put added strokes to your game! Sand traps and water hazards have nothing compared to the way a green can devastate your putting game with various angles, slopes and cut-away runs that can send your ball, once you even make it onto the green, rolling back away from the pin to drop into a water hazard.

Well, the PGA Championship has just ended and there is still a full summer and fall season of Championship golf to watch and your own weekly games to take part in. If you want to help shave some strokes off of your game, you may want to consider giving yourself a little advantage. Now, we're not saying you need to be a little light with the pencil as your marking your scorecard, that just wouldn’t be on the up and, up right? No, we are talking about giving yourself a little advantage in the way of a technology advantage. We are speaking of a Golf Watch!

The Garmin Approach S60 GPS Golf Watch to be precise! This golf buddy provides precise distances to each location on the course, as well as “Plays-Like Distance”, which adjusts yardages to account for uphill and downhill shots so you can select the best club for the situation. And with Touch Targeting, you can touch any point on the map for precise measurement to that exact spot — including fairway, sand traps, water hazards and more. And when you're about to lay up for the pin, “Green View” gives you each green’s true shape from wherever you are on the course, and it allows you to manually drag-and-drop the pin into the correct location for the day for greater accuracy. “PinPointer” even tells you the direction to the pin when you have a blind shot.

And your getting more than just a “Golfers Helper" here, In fact, this watch can be used for more than just golfing with preloaded activity profiles for running, cycling, swimming and more. And with activity-tracking features, including the move bar, vibration alerts, calories and steps, the Approach S60 will help you stay fit, day in and day out.

So, there you have it. After all, using all the benefits technology has to offer is by no means cheating on your golf game, right? After all, you still need to hit the ball 😊

See you out on the greens, your golfing companions here at HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com!




Read more

In the summer we always look forward to great weather. After all, the sun comes up early and sets later so that our days are longer than at any time of the year. How we spend that time dictates what we talk about when the winter winds begin to blow, and that white, wet snow begins to fall. Some of us like to take advantage of the summer sun and head out to a sandy beach or secluded pond to do some swimming, fishing or just plain soaking up all that sunshine.

But there is that group of men and women that can't wait for the snow to melt away from their favorite golf course so that they can begin to shake the rust off of not only their clubs but also themselves after being forced to watch the reruns of championship golf matches on the golf channel.

If your one of these golf enthusiasts, then you know the only way to improve your game is to practice, practice and more practice. Working on your swing, your long drive, chipping and of course your putting. Nothing does more to help improve your game than becoming familiar with the lay of the land that makes up your course. The different contours the fairways have, the various obstacles that the designer of the course made sure that it's laid out, with enough of a challenge so that it tests your mettle and don’t forget the greens. The lay of the greens can put added strokes to your game! Sand traps and water hazards have nothing compared to the way a green can devastate your putting game with various angles, slopes and cut-away runs that can send your ball, once you even make it onto the green, rolling back away from the pin to drop into a water hazard.

Well, the PGA Championship has just ended and there is still a full summer and fall season of Championship golf to watch and your own weekly games to take part in. If you want to help shave some strokes off of your game, you may want to consider giving yourself a little advantage. Now, we're not saying you need to be a little light with the pencil as your marking your scorecard, that just wouldn’t be on the up and, up right? No, we are talking about giving yourself a little advantage in the way of a technology advantage. We are speaking of a Golf Watch!

The Garmin Approach S60 GPS Golf Watch to be precise! This golf buddy provides precise distances to each location on the course, as well as “Plays-Like Distance”, which adjusts yardages to account for uphill and downhill shots so you can select the best club for the situation. And with Touch Targeting, you can touch any point on the map for precise measurement to that exact spot — including fairway, sand traps, water hazards and more. And when you're about to lay up for the pin, “Green View” gives you each green’s true shape from wherever you are on the course, and it allows you to manually drag-and-drop the pin into the correct location for the day for greater accuracy. “PinPointer” even tells you the direction to the pin when you have a blind shot.

And your getting more than just a “Golfers Helper" here, In fact, this watch can be used for more than just golfing with preloaded activity profiles for running, cycling, swimming and more. And with activity-tracking features, including the move bar, vibration alerts, calories and steps, the Approach S60 will help you stay fit, day in and day out.

So, there you have it. After all, using all the benefits technology has to offer is by no means cheating on your golf game, right? After all, you still need to hit the ball 😊

See you out on the greens, your golfing companions here at HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com!




Read more

Mercury’s Rising, And So Is The Risk Of Health Related Issues When The Heat Index Is Up!

We all have been waiting for the summer to get here and now that it is here you may want to dial back your exercising if you're not doing it in a controlled space like a gym or climate controlled training facility. After all, with the summer also comes the humidity and that intense sun that drives up the temperature along with the ambient heat index. Both of which can cause some serious problems if you’re not watching out for them.

Exercising in hot weather puts extra stress on your body. If you don't take care when exercising in the heat, you risk serious illness. Both the exercise itself and the air temperature and humidity can increase your core body temperature. To help cool itself, your body sends more blood to circulate through your skin. This causes the heart to pump faster and for the blood to start rushing through your veins. If you’re not in good physical condition to start with, you need to dial back your exercising a bit in order to reduce that extra stress your heart is going to be facing. This time of year, most ER's see increasing patients brought in to them with heart-related conditions brought on by overexertion in the extreme heat.

And that myth that the more you sweat means your burning more calories is just that, a MYTH! Sweat is not a gauge of how hard you are working," Scott says. (Jenny Scott, MM-HR, NASM-CPT, CES, PES, FNS, Education Advisor for the National Academy of Sports Medicine) "Our bodies produce sweat as a way to cool down, so if anything, it's an indicator of how hot your body is. And hotter core temperatures don't equal more calories burned.

In fact, the fitter you are, the less you probably sweat. "As your body becomes more conditioned, it takes more intense exercise to increase your core body temperature and produce sweat," she says.

Still, if you're a hot, sweaty mess 10 minutes into your workout, it doesn't necessarily mean you're not fit. Different people have different numbers of sweat glands, so even a brisk walk to the mailbox can trigger sweat production in some women. On the flip side, if you're working hard and hardly sweating, you might be super-fit, blessed with minimal sweat glands, or dehydrated. After all, sweating depends on having water to spare.

To keep your tank full, Scott recommends downing about 24 ounces of water (that's about how much most sports bottles fit) before your warm-up and drinking about 8 more every 30 minutes throughout your sweat session. Keep sipping throughout the day, and keep in mind that if you feel thirsty, you're probably already dehydrated.

It’s important to realize that a climbing heat index needs to be taken into consideration when your exercising. Whether you're running, playing a pickup game of basketball or going for a power walk, take care when the temperature rises. If you exercise outdoors in hot weather.

To help cool itself, your body sends more blood to circulate through your skin. This leaves less blood for your muscles, which in turn increases your heart rate. If the humidity also is high, your body faces added stress because sweat doesn't readily evaporate from your skin. That pushes your body temperature even higher.

Heat-related illness
Heat cramps
Heat exhaustion
Heatstroke

Under normal conditions, your skin, blood vessels, and perspiration level adjust to the heat. But these natural cooling systems may fail if you're exposed to high temperatures and humidity for too long, you sweat heavily, and you don't drink enough fluids.

The result may be a heat-related illness. Heat-related illnesses occur along a spectrum, starting out mild but worsening if left untreated. Heat illnesses include:

Heat cramps: Heat cramps, sometimes called exercise-associated muscle cramps, are painful muscle contractions that can occur with exercise. Affected muscles may feel firm to the touch. You may feel muscle pain or spasms. Your body temperature may be normal.

Heat syncope and exercise-associated collapse: Heat syncope is a feeling of lightheadedness or fainting caused by high temperatures, often occurring after standing for a long period of time or standing quickly after sitting for a long period of time. Exercise-associated collapse is feeling lightheaded or fainting immediately after exercising, and it can occur especially if you immediately stop running and stand after a race or a long run.

Heat exhaustion: With heat exhaustion, your body temperature rises as high as 104 F (40 C), and you may experience nausea, vomiting, weakness, headache, fainting, sweating and cold, clammy skin. If left untreated, heat exhaustion can lead to heatstroke.

Heatstroke: Heatstroke is a life-threatening emergency condition that occurs when your body temperature is greater than 104 F (40 C). Your skin may be dry from lack of sweat, or it may be moist.

You may develop confusion, irritability, headache, heart rhythm problems, dizziness, fainting, nausea, vomiting, visual problems, and fatigue. You need immediate medical attention to prevent brain damage, organ failure or even death.

Pay attention to warning signs
During hot-weather exercise, watch for signs and symptoms of heat-related illness. If you ignore these symptoms, your condition can worsen, resulting in a medical emergency. Signs and symptoms may include:

Muscle cramps
Nausea or vomiting
Weakness
Fatigue
A headache
Excessive sweating
Dizziness or lightheadedness
Confusion
Irritability
Low blood pressure
Increased heart rate
Visual problems

If you develop any of these symptoms, you must lower your body temperature and get hydrated right away. Stop exercising immediately and get out of the heat. If possible, have someone stay with you who can help monitor your condition.

Measuring core body temperature with a rectal thermometer is essential to accurately determine the degree of heat injury. An oral, ear or forehead thermometer doesn't provide an accurate temperature reading for this purpose. In cases of heatstroke, due to confusion and mental status changes, you won't be able to treat yourself and you'll require emergency medical care. The most effective way of rapid cooling is the immersion of your body in a cold- or ice-water tub.

In cases of heat exhaustion, remove extra clothing or sports equipment. Make sure you are around people who can help you and assist in your care. If possible, fan your body or wet down your body with cool water.

You may place cool, wet towels or ice packs on your neck, forehead and under your arms, spray yourself with water from a hose or shower, or sit in a tub filled with cold water. Drink fluids such as water or a sports drink. If you don't feel better within about 20 minutes, seek emergency medical care.

Keeping an eye out for any of the above signs will give you a heads up to take the necessary steps to get your core body temperature down. But another good way to stay on top of your body’s stress while exercising in warmer temperatures is to keep an eye on your heart rate as well. One good way to do this is with a good Heart Rate Monitor, one like the Garmin Vivosport GPS Sport & Activity Tracker  This Smart Activity Tracker has a wrist-based heart rate monitor that uses Garmin's new "Elevate 24/7" wrist-based heart rate monitoring. With the heart rate data it collects, Vívosport is able to estimate your VO2 max and fitness age, 2 indicators of physical fitness that can improve over time with regular exercise. It also tracks your HRV (heart rate variability), which is used to calculate and display your stress level. Which is something you want to keep an eye on with the warmer weather. The goal of this continuous monitoring is to make you aware when physical or emotional sources cause your stress level to rise so you can find a way to relieve the pressure.

With the information available from your Garmin Vivosport along with paying attention to your physical condition while exercising you should be able to get the most out of your exercise routines while being safe as you exercise in this summertime heat.

Be smart, pay attention to your body, it will let you know when it needs attention, so DON’T ignore any warning signs it’s giving you!





Read more

We all have been waiting for the summer to get here and now that it is here you may want to dial back your exercising if you're not doing it in a controlled space like a gym or climate controlled training facility. After all, with the summer also comes the humidity and that intense sun that drives up the temperature along with the ambient heat index. Both of which can cause some serious problems if you’re not watching out for them.

Exercising in hot weather puts extra stress on your body. If you don't take care when exercising in the heat, you risk serious illness. Both the exercise itself and the air temperature and humidity can increase your core body temperature. To help cool itself, your body sends more blood to circulate through your skin. This causes the heart to pump faster and for the blood to start rushing through your veins. If you’re not in good physical condition to start with, you need to dial back your exercising a bit in order to reduce that extra stress your heart is going to be facing. This time of year, most ER's see increasing patients brought in to them with heart-related conditions brought on by overexertion in the extreme heat.

And that myth that the more you sweat means your burning more calories is just that, a MYTH! Sweat is not a gauge of how hard you are working," Scott says. (Jenny Scott, MM-HR, NASM-CPT, CES, PES, FNS, Education Advisor for the National Academy of Sports Medicine) "Our bodies produce sweat as a way to cool down, so if anything, it's an indicator of how hot your body is. And hotter core temperatures don't equal more calories burned.

In fact, the fitter you are, the less you probably sweat. "As your body becomes more conditioned, it takes more intense exercise to increase your core body temperature and produce sweat," she says.

Still, if you're a hot, sweaty mess 10 minutes into your workout, it doesn't necessarily mean you're not fit. Different people have different numbers of sweat glands, so even a brisk walk to the mailbox can trigger sweat production in some women. On the flip side, if you're working hard and hardly sweating, you might be super-fit, blessed with minimal sweat glands, or dehydrated. After all, sweating depends on having water to spare.

To keep your tank full, Scott recommends downing about 24 ounces of water (that's about how much most sports bottles fit) before your warm-up and drinking about 8 more every 30 minutes throughout your sweat session. Keep sipping throughout the day, and keep in mind that if you feel thirsty, you're probably already dehydrated.

It’s important to realize that a climbing heat index needs to be taken into consideration when your exercising. Whether you're running, playing a pickup game of basketball or going for a power walk, take care when the temperature rises. If you exercise outdoors in hot weather.

To help cool itself, your body sends more blood to circulate through your skin. This leaves less blood for your muscles, which in turn increases your heart rate. If the humidity also is high, your body faces added stress because sweat doesn't readily evaporate from your skin. That pushes your body temperature even higher.

Heat-related illness
Heat cramps
Heat exhaustion
Heatstroke

Under normal conditions, your skin, blood vessels, and perspiration level adjust to the heat. But these natural cooling systems may fail if you're exposed to high temperatures and humidity for too long, you sweat heavily, and you don't drink enough fluids.

The result may be a heat-related illness. Heat-related illnesses occur along a spectrum, starting out mild but worsening if left untreated. Heat illnesses include:

Heat cramps: Heat cramps, sometimes called exercise-associated muscle cramps, are painful muscle contractions that can occur with exercise. Affected muscles may feel firm to the touch. You may feel muscle pain or spasms. Your body temperature may be normal.

Heat syncope and exercise-associated collapse: Heat syncope is a feeling of lightheadedness or fainting caused by high temperatures, often occurring after standing for a long period of time or standing quickly after sitting for a long period of time. Exercise-associated collapse is feeling lightheaded or fainting immediately after exercising, and it can occur especially if you immediately stop running and stand after a race or a long run.

Heat exhaustion: With heat exhaustion, your body temperature rises as high as 104 F (40 C), and you may experience nausea, vomiting, weakness, headache, fainting, sweating and cold, clammy skin. If left untreated, heat exhaustion can lead to heatstroke.

Heatstroke: Heatstroke is a life-threatening emergency condition that occurs when your body temperature is greater than 104 F (40 C). Your skin may be dry from lack of sweat, or it may be moist.

You may develop confusion, irritability, headache, heart rhythm problems, dizziness, fainting, nausea, vomiting, visual problems, and fatigue. You need immediate medical attention to prevent brain damage, organ failure or even death.

Pay attention to warning signs
During hot-weather exercise, watch for signs and symptoms of heat-related illness. If you ignore these symptoms, your condition can worsen, resulting in a medical emergency. Signs and symptoms may include:

Muscle cramps
Nausea or vomiting
Weakness
Fatigue
A headache
Excessive sweating
Dizziness or lightheadedness
Confusion
Irritability
Low blood pressure
Increased heart rate
Visual problems

If you develop any of these symptoms, you must lower your body temperature and get hydrated right away. Stop exercising immediately and get out of the heat. If possible, have someone stay with you who can help monitor your condition.

Measuring core body temperature with a rectal thermometer is essential to accurately determine the degree of heat injury. An oral, ear or forehead thermometer doesn't provide an accurate temperature reading for this purpose. In cases of heatstroke, due to confusion and mental status changes, you won't be able to treat yourself and you'll require emergency medical care. The most effective way of rapid cooling is the immersion of your body in a cold- or ice-water tub.

In cases of heat exhaustion, remove extra clothing or sports equipment. Make sure you are around people who can help you and assist in your care. If possible, fan your body or wet down your body with cool water.

You may place cool, wet towels or ice packs on your neck, forehead and under your arms, spray yourself with water from a hose or shower, or sit in a tub filled with cold water. Drink fluids such as water or a sports drink. If you don't feel better within about 20 minutes, seek emergency medical care.

Keeping an eye out for any of the above signs will give you a heads up to take the necessary steps to get your core body temperature down. But another good way to stay on top of your body’s stress while exercising in warmer temperatures is to keep an eye on your heart rate as well. One good way to do this is with a good Heart Rate Monitor, one like the Garmin Vivosport GPS Sport & Activity Tracker  This Smart Activity Tracker has a wrist-based heart rate monitor that uses Garmin's new "Elevate 24/7" wrist-based heart rate monitoring. With the heart rate data it collects, Vívosport is able to estimate your VO2 max and fitness age, 2 indicators of physical fitness that can improve over time with regular exercise. It also tracks your HRV (heart rate variability), which is used to calculate and display your stress level. Which is something you want to keep an eye on with the warmer weather. The goal of this continuous monitoring is to make you aware when physical or emotional sources cause your stress level to rise so you can find a way to relieve the pressure.

With the information available from your Garmin Vivosport along with paying attention to your physical condition while exercising you should be able to get the most out of your exercise routines while being safe as you exercise in this summertime heat.

Be smart, pay attention to your body, it will let you know when it needs attention, so DON’T ignore any warning signs it’s giving you!





Read more