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Summer Is Here And There’s No Better Time Fr A Bike Ride

Summer, 2019 is within striking distance! Well, it is, it’s arriving this Friday, June 21st. 2019!
If you live in the eastern part of the country, for that matter anywhere east and north of the Mississippi, you know the weather has not been optimal for anything outdoors so far this year. But that is going to change! At least we HOPE it’s going to change! But knowing that everything rights itself in time, we are looking forward to a summer season with hot, sunny weather that’s just made for any cyclist to want to hop on his or her bike and start taking the high road to scenic vistas.

Knowing this day has been coming you’ve already gone through all the necessary steps to make sure your bike is in good condition to take to the open highway or those mountain trails! And if you haven’t done so yet, shame on you. So, we might just cover those steps in an upcoming post! Lucky You!

Making sure your bikes in great shape, is only one point to consider, knowing you're in good shape, physically is also important. So, before you start going on long distance bike hike or inspiring cycling journey, which is what we like to call it. Regardless of what you call it, you need to make sure that you stay on top of your physical game. Get yourself checked out by your physician before undertaking any new physical endurance challenges. After all, if you’re not familiar with all the rigors that long distance cyclists can encounter, and there are a few, having an unknown ailment happen when your miles away from home can cause a serious problem that you don’t need to have happened to you! So make sure you get a clean bill of health from your physician, and you can peddle your way down the road knowing you're in fine shape, physically to enjoy the ride.

Besides a good, reliable bike and the customary cycling attire, one item that serious cyclists take with them on their rides is a good, accurate cycling computer. After all, you want to know not only where your going, but WHERE you are at any time during your ride. How fast you're going, distance traveled, distance to go, your cadence and even the ability to have your route available with turn by turn navigation available. One such bike computer is the Garmin Edge 830!  This reliable cycling computer by Garmin will take any guesswork out of a cyclists trip and provide the peace of mind any cyclist would like to have so that they can enjoy their bike trip. After all, isn’t that the whole point of getting out there on a bike? Well isn’t it?

For an overview of just what the Edge 830 has to offer, we’ve listed a few here below:

Performance GPS cycling computer with mapping

Dynamic performance monitoring provides insights on your VO2 max, recovery, training load focus, heat and altitude acclimation, nutrition, hydration and more when paired with compatible sensors
Cycling safety features include new bike alarm, group messaging and tracking, incident detection and compatibility with Varia™ rearview radar and lights so you can see and be seen

Includes routable Garmin Cycle Map with popularity routing —which helps you ride like a local —plus off-course recalculation and back to start; mountain biking model has integrated Trailforks data, including trail difficulty ratings

Customize with free apps, widgets and data fields from the Connect IQ™ Store

MTB dynamics track jump count, jump distance and hang time as well as grit, a measure of the ride’s difficulty, and Flow, which tracks the smoothness of your descent, so you have a score to beat next time

Battery life: up to 20 hours with GPS; works with Garmin Charge™ power pack for up to 40 hours of additional battery life

Garmin Edge 830 setup and app functionality:

The Edge 830 has both onboard WiFi and Bluetooth connections so it’s possible to directly pair the device to any WiFi network. Once connected, the device will automatically link to Garmin’s servers where it can sync your device.
If WiFi isn’t available and you’ve got your phone, the device can connect to the internet via your smartphone using Bluetooth.
It’s startling how easy it is to set up the Edge 830 with or without the smartphone app, Garmin Express or Garmin Connect. Turn it on for the first time and you’re prompted to input a few crucial bits of personal information (that can later be edited if required) and the GPS is ready to use.
Likewise, fire up the app on your phone, connect it to the Edge 830 device and everything that you wish to achieve such as route mapping, training load, performance and health status and activity syncing, it’s intuitively ready and easy to use.

It’s a similar affair on the computer using the Garmin Connect web-based app, via the Garmin Express computer program. Everything that’s available online in Garmin Connect is in the smartphone app, which ensures seamless compatibility and functionality between your devices. The level of usability and inter-app syncing really impressed me.
Strava integration is top-notch too, and after just a few clicks that are needed to authorize Strava to see my data, the Garmin Edge 830 was already connected, and my rides synced with Strava.
However, on-device Strava Live segments require a Strava Summit membership, and for your smartphone to be connected to the device.

Bundled in this feature-set is the device’s ability to act as an alarm for your bike
The incident detection feature, which alerts a pre-defined contact that you’ve had an accident, requires that the device is paired with and connected to your phone which needs to be smart.

This feature provides the device to act as an alarm for your bike. Activate the alarm on the device and if someone moves your bike then the Edge 830 will send a notification to your smartphone.
Once again, while this sounds like a great idea it won’t stop or even deter a determined thief who’ll end up walking (or riding or running!) away with your precious bike and fancy GPS computer. If they have the mind to steal it!

If you’ve got your smartphone tethered to the Edge 530, the device displays notifications from incoming calls and text messages — these help you to quickly decide whether you need to answer your phone or can safely ignore the interruption to your blissful ride.

Garmin Edge 830 route finding and mapping performance
The turn-by-turn navigation is fantastic on the Edge 830. The on-screen map, when zoomed in, provides excellent levels of detail and accurate guidance instructions with ample warning — both audible and visual — when a turn is approaching.
When you’re not on the mapping screen the navigation notifications with a map appear over your current screen, so, in theory, at least, you should never miss another turn again.

The navigation function works fantastically when you’ve uploaded a pre-programmed route on the device, but relies on the device’s own smart routing functionality, and you’re in for what can be a rough ride — quite literally.
Although the on-device route creation is intuitive to use, and for the most part doesn’t require hours of studying the instruction manual, some of the menu functions are a little clunky. It’s possible to find yourself two, three or even four menus deep before you can change or select the option you’re looking to modify.

That said, if you’re without a smartphone or computer, route creation far exceeds what used to be possible on-device from both usability and technical points of view compared to only a few years ago.

There are plenty of options on the Edge 830 to create routes with different parameters, such as ride type: road, mixed, gravel or unpaved and mountain biking. This makes you able to explore new roads, paths and gravel sections close to home that remained undiscovered.

To help the device create great routes, Garmin uses data similar to that created by Strava’s heatmaps that it’s called Popularity Routing. Garmin claims it should help you ride like a local. The Edge 830 creates routes using this data to help you ride the best, or at least most ridden trails or roads in any area.

Once you’ve dialed in your chosen route parameters and set the device to create a route, it takes anywhere between 15 seconds and a few minutes to generate a route, depending on route length and other parameters, such as waypoints. The route can be either point-to-point or circular.
The get you home function works well, and you can choose between a different route entirely or follow the same route you’ve just taken to get you back to your starting point. If you need to get back to the start for whatever reason, it’s a good, reliable method.
It would certainly be fair to say that Garmin’s claims of ‘riding like a local’ are true; the device’s route creation isn’t ideal but is a great feature to get you out of a bit of bind if called upon.

Garmin Edge 830 displays and information
In record mode the device has four screens as standard — one that displays current speed, average speed, distance traveled, time, calories burnt (with compatible sensor connected) and current elevation. There’s a lap screen — the device records a new lap every 5km by default — that displays current speed and distance with your average speed for your previous laps.

The navigation and map screens show your current location on a map and your route if you have one programmed. The final screen displays past elevation data in a graph, your current heading, and current altitude.
Each display is crisp and purposeful and shows you more than enough information for any given ride.
The device’s display and functionality are customizable with apps, widgets and data fields from the Connect IQ Store. Conveniently, the store is available directly from the device’s home screen.

Garmin Edge 830 battery life
Garmin claims the battery can last up to 20 hours on GPS mode and up to 40 hours with an additional power pack or if it’s in battery save mode.
In reality, these figures are going to be less but like any electronic device it’s battery life depends greatly on how you use it and what you’re using it for, how bright the display is and how many times you use the touchscreen.

In navigation mode and with plenty of device messing about, route reprogramming and general use I drained about 25 percent of the battery after two hours of recording.
With these heavy usage habits, it’s safe to extrapolate that the battery would last eight hours on-trail recording — pretty impressive considering the outgoing Edge 820 only lasted four hours in similar conditions.

Garmin Edge 830 bottom line
With an impressive array of interesting and useful — if a little clunky at times — features, the Edge 830 is a true class-leading GPS that really offers plenty of useful functions above and beyond its competition.
The maps and navigation features are easy to understand and it’s relatively simple to program in routes. On-device route calculation isn’t great, though, and it certainly didn’t live up to Garmin’s claims of riding like a local.

The on-device data and displays are fantastically simple to read when you’re on the move, but it’s certainly worth investing in the additional sensors if you don’t already own compatible ones.

So, there you have it. Summer Sun, heat and cloudless skies. All you need to give you the itch to get out on your bike and view some new sites and smells as you traverse the miles of roads that will soon welcome you as you travel on down them. And with the Garmin Edge 830 your going to able to plot your way not only there and benefit from all that data it gathers. But you're also going to have an easy time traveling back the way you came with its “At a Glance” retrace your route function.

So, I guess we’ll just have to say, see ya on the road!

 

Read more

Summer, 2019 is within striking distance! Well, it is, it’s arriving this Friday, June 21st. 2019!
If you live in the eastern part of the country, for that matter anywhere east and north of the Mississippi, you know the weather has not been optimal for anything outdoors so far this year. But that is going to change! At least we HOPE it’s going to change! But knowing that everything rights itself in time, we are looking forward to a summer season with hot, sunny weather that’s just made for any cyclist to want to hop on his or her bike and start taking the high road to scenic vistas.

Knowing this day has been coming you’ve already gone through all the necessary steps to make sure your bike is in good condition to take to the open highway or those mountain trails! And if you haven’t done so yet, shame on you. So, we might just cover those steps in an upcoming post! Lucky You!

Making sure your bikes in great shape, is only one point to consider, knowing you're in good shape, physically is also important. So, before you start going on long distance bike hike or inspiring cycling journey, which is what we like to call it. Regardless of what you call it, you need to make sure that you stay on top of your physical game. Get yourself checked out by your physician before undertaking any new physical endurance challenges. After all, if you’re not familiar with all the rigors that long distance cyclists can encounter, and there are a few, having an unknown ailment happen when your miles away from home can cause a serious problem that you don’t need to have happened to you! So make sure you get a clean bill of health from your physician, and you can peddle your way down the road knowing you're in fine shape, physically to enjoy the ride.

Besides a good, reliable bike and the customary cycling attire, one item that serious cyclists take with them on their rides is a good, accurate cycling computer. After all, you want to know not only where your going, but WHERE you are at any time during your ride. How fast you're going, distance traveled, distance to go, your cadence and even the ability to have your route available with turn by turn navigation available. One such bike computer is the Garmin Edge 830!  This reliable cycling computer by Garmin will take any guesswork out of a cyclists trip and provide the peace of mind any cyclist would like to have so that they can enjoy their bike trip. After all, isn’t that the whole point of getting out there on a bike? Well isn’t it?

For an overview of just what the Edge 830 has to offer, we’ve listed a few here below:

Performance GPS cycling computer with mapping

Dynamic performance monitoring provides insights on your VO2 max, recovery, training load focus, heat and altitude acclimation, nutrition, hydration and more when paired with compatible sensors
Cycling safety features include new bike alarm, group messaging and tracking, incident detection and compatibility with Varia™ rearview radar and lights so you can see and be seen

Includes routable Garmin Cycle Map with popularity routing —which helps you ride like a local —plus off-course recalculation and back to start; mountain biking model has integrated Trailforks data, including trail difficulty ratings

Customize with free apps, widgets and data fields from the Connect IQ™ Store

MTB dynamics track jump count, jump distance and hang time as well as grit, a measure of the ride’s difficulty, and Flow, which tracks the smoothness of your descent, so you have a score to beat next time

Battery life: up to 20 hours with GPS; works with Garmin Charge™ power pack for up to 40 hours of additional battery life

Garmin Edge 830 setup and app functionality:

The Edge 830 has both onboard WiFi and Bluetooth connections so it’s possible to directly pair the device to any WiFi network. Once connected, the device will automatically link to Garmin’s servers where it can sync your device.
If WiFi isn’t available and you’ve got your phone, the device can connect to the internet via your smartphone using Bluetooth.
It’s startling how easy it is to set up the Edge 830 with or without the smartphone app, Garmin Express or Garmin Connect. Turn it on for the first time and you’re prompted to input a few crucial bits of personal information (that can later be edited if required) and the GPS is ready to use.
Likewise, fire up the app on your phone, connect it to the Edge 830 device and everything that you wish to achieve such as route mapping, training load, performance and health status and activity syncing, it’s intuitively ready and easy to use.

It’s a similar affair on the computer using the Garmin Connect web-based app, via the Garmin Express computer program. Everything that’s available online in Garmin Connect is in the smartphone app, which ensures seamless compatibility and functionality between your devices. The level of usability and inter-app syncing really impressed me.
Strava integration is top-notch too, and after just a few clicks that are needed to authorize Strava to see my data, the Garmin Edge 830 was already connected, and my rides synced with Strava.
However, on-device Strava Live segments require a Strava Summit membership, and for your smartphone to be connected to the device.

Bundled in this feature-set is the device’s ability to act as an alarm for your bike
The incident detection feature, which alerts a pre-defined contact that you’ve had an accident, requires that the device is paired with and connected to your phone which needs to be smart.

This feature provides the device to act as an alarm for your bike. Activate the alarm on the device and if someone moves your bike then the Edge 830 will send a notification to your smartphone.
Once again, while this sounds like a great idea it won’t stop or even deter a determined thief who’ll end up walking (or riding or running!) away with your precious bike and fancy GPS computer. If they have the mind to steal it!

If you’ve got your smartphone tethered to the Edge 530, the device displays notifications from incoming calls and text messages — these help you to quickly decide whether you need to answer your phone or can safely ignore the interruption to your blissful ride.

Garmin Edge 830 route finding and mapping performance
The turn-by-turn navigation is fantastic on the Edge 830. The on-screen map, when zoomed in, provides excellent levels of detail and accurate guidance instructions with ample warning — both audible and visual — when a turn is approaching.
When you’re not on the mapping screen the navigation notifications with a map appear over your current screen, so, in theory, at least, you should never miss another turn again.

The navigation function works fantastically when you’ve uploaded a pre-programmed route on the device, but relies on the device’s own smart routing functionality, and you’re in for what can be a rough ride — quite literally.
Although the on-device route creation is intuitive to use, and for the most part doesn’t require hours of studying the instruction manual, some of the menu functions are a little clunky. It’s possible to find yourself two, three or even four menus deep before you can change or select the option you’re looking to modify.

That said, if you’re without a smartphone or computer, route creation far exceeds what used to be possible on-device from both usability and technical points of view compared to only a few years ago.

There are plenty of options on the Edge 830 to create routes with different parameters, such as ride type: road, mixed, gravel or unpaved and mountain biking. This makes you able to explore new roads, paths and gravel sections close to home that remained undiscovered.

To help the device create great routes, Garmin uses data similar to that created by Strava’s heatmaps that it’s called Popularity Routing. Garmin claims it should help you ride like a local. The Edge 830 creates routes using this data to help you ride the best, or at least most ridden trails or roads in any area.

Once you’ve dialed in your chosen route parameters and set the device to create a route, it takes anywhere between 15 seconds and a few minutes to generate a route, depending on route length and other parameters, such as waypoints. The route can be either point-to-point or circular.
The get you home function works well, and you can choose between a different route entirely or follow the same route you’ve just taken to get you back to your starting point. If you need to get back to the start for whatever reason, it’s a good, reliable method.
It would certainly be fair to say that Garmin’s claims of ‘riding like a local’ are true; the device’s route creation isn’t ideal but is a great feature to get you out of a bit of bind if called upon.

Garmin Edge 830 displays and information
In record mode the device has four screens as standard — one that displays current speed, average speed, distance traveled, time, calories burnt (with compatible sensor connected) and current elevation. There’s a lap screen — the device records a new lap every 5km by default — that displays current speed and distance with your average speed for your previous laps.

The navigation and map screens show your current location on a map and your route if you have one programmed. The final screen displays past elevation data in a graph, your current heading, and current altitude.
Each display is crisp and purposeful and shows you more than enough information for any given ride.
The device’s display and functionality are customizable with apps, widgets and data fields from the Connect IQ Store. Conveniently, the store is available directly from the device’s home screen.

Garmin Edge 830 battery life
Garmin claims the battery can last up to 20 hours on GPS mode and up to 40 hours with an additional power pack or if it’s in battery save mode.
In reality, these figures are going to be less but like any electronic device it’s battery life depends greatly on how you use it and what you’re using it for, how bright the display is and how many times you use the touchscreen.

In navigation mode and with plenty of device messing about, route reprogramming and general use I drained about 25 percent of the battery after two hours of recording.
With these heavy usage habits, it’s safe to extrapolate that the battery would last eight hours on-trail recording — pretty impressive considering the outgoing Edge 820 only lasted four hours in similar conditions.

Garmin Edge 830 bottom line
With an impressive array of interesting and useful — if a little clunky at times — features, the Edge 830 is a true class-leading GPS that really offers plenty of useful functions above and beyond its competition.
The maps and navigation features are easy to understand and it’s relatively simple to program in routes. On-device route calculation isn’t great, though, and it certainly didn’t live up to Garmin’s claims of riding like a local.

The on-device data and displays are fantastically simple to read when you’re on the move, but it’s certainly worth investing in the additional sensors if you don’t already own compatible ones.

So, there you have it. Summer Sun, heat and cloudless skies. All you need to give you the itch to get out on your bike and view some new sites and smells as you traverse the miles of roads that will soon welcome you as you travel on down them. And with the Garmin Edge 830 your going to able to plot your way not only there and benefit from all that data it gathers. But you're also going to have an easy time traveling back the way you came with its “At a Glance” retrace your route function.

So, I guess we’ll just have to say, see ya on the road!

 

Read more

Your Never Really Going It Alone If You Have An “InReach”

If you enjoy hiking the back-country, biking up and down remote mountain passes or navigating a course out on the water where your curious about what lies just over the horizon, you are an adventurer. You are part of an elite group of men and women, who like to test themselves against the norm. But one thing this group has in common is the awareness of preparedness in case something goes wrong. We’ve all heard the saying its just “Murphy’s Law” happening. Well, that’s all well and good if whatever happens doesn’t put you in harm’s way, because your bike broke down, or you slipped on some loose shale and slid down a rocky embankment and injured your legs or your back. Or an even worse scenario, you're out there, just outside the tide-water and your boat starts taking on water. Just what would you do?

Most everyone today has their pick of the latest technological devices to communicate with family, friends, the outside world. But if your part of that group, we mentioned above, that enjoys pushing their limits and are usually in remote locations, where cell phone coverage is spotty if available at all, then things can get a little dicey.

So, what do you do? You're out there, alone, maybe injured, or out mountain-biking in unfamiliar surroundings, or off out there on the water and your boat starts taking on water and you can’t raise anyone on the radio, or your cell phone, you could be in deep trouble! Well, there is a device that can connect you anywhere in the world, so you can get help, by getting in contact with them via a text message. That device is called the inReach, Satellite communicator by Garmin

Most anyone who is into either fitness or relies on finding their way with a reliable, accurate GPS device is familiar with the name of Garmin. They practically developed the current GPS navigation system and are one of the leaders in providing GPS devices that can fit on your wrist, held in your hand or mounted to a bike to provide you with turn by turn directions to help you find your way to where you need to be.

Garmin has invested in satellite technology via a 100% global Iridium® satellite network. You are virtually connected via text messages to those that you allow to receive them. This way you can stay in contact from Alaska to a remote mountain village in Colombia, if necessary. And if your injured, or taken ill and need help the Garmin inReach Handheld Communicator with GPS  can send an “SOS” communication signal complete with your GPS coordinates to a 24/7 monitoring center, where you can text back and forth with that support person, about the nature of your emergency, and receive a confirmation when help is on the way!

These handheld satellite communicators are designed for the outdoor enthusiast who wants to roam further and experience more – without compromising their loved ones‘ peace of mind. From backcountry experiences to international adventures, the inReach provides communication, location sharing, navigation and critical SOS functions for anyone who loves getting away from it all, on land, water or in the skies.

Using the worldwide coverage of the Iridium satellite network, these go-anywhere portable devices let you exchange text messages with any cell phone number or email address anywhere – while using GPS to track and share your journey’s progress. You can also post to social media or even communicate inReach-to-inReach in the field.

You don’t have to worry about being within the range of a cell tower – or encountering spotty coverage in fringe zones or blackout areas. Your inReach communicator works anywhere and everywhere – so you’re never out of range, never out of reach!

Just to provide some examples of how well this communication device works out in the field, we’ve provided a few actual transcripts of events where the Garmin inReach Handheld Communicator provided the necessary direct access to a monitoring technician who dispatched emergency services where they were needed.


Using an inReach SE in California, U.S. – A group of backpackers camping in the Caribou Mountain area reported that a mountain lion was stalking the group and charged at them several times in the night. GEOS contacted area law enforcement and a game warden to request assistance. Law enforcement could not fly into the area at night, but officers stayed in contact with the group via text to provide advice and encourage them to stay vigilant. At daylight, the group hiked out. There was no sign of the mountain lion during the day, but they remained in contact with GEOS and law enforcement until they reached their cars safely.

On Friday with an inReach Explorer+ in California, U.S., A subscriber reported that a family member was experiencing chest pains and having trouble breathing while in the Sierra National Forest. Local search and rescue evacuated the individual via helicopter to a hospital for treatment.

Sunday with an inReach Explorer+ in British Columbia, Canada – A subscriber experienced snow blindness while mountain climbing with a group. Search and rescue transported the subscriber via helicopter to an area hospital.

Sunday with an inReach Explorer in Washington, U.S. – A subscriber reported that a third-party individual fell while descending Mt. Adams and sustained several injuries. A search and rescue ground team arrived, and the individual was eventually transported by helicopter to an area hospital.

Knowing that your never really alone can give you that extra bit of confidence when you're out on your own, doing what you love to be doing. Keeping a Garmin inReach Communicator with you on your excursions can be that “Ace-in-a-Hole” that sees that you get home safely to friends and family. So, don’t YOU want to be “inReach”?


Read more
If you enjoy hiking the back-country, biking up and down remote mountain passes or navigating a course out on the water where your curious about what lies just over the horizon, you are an adventurer. You are part of an elite group of men and women, who like to test themselves against the norm. But one thing this group has in common is the awareness of preparedness in case something goes wrong. We’ve all heard the saying its just “Murphy’s Law” happening. Well, that’s all well and good if whatever happens doesn’t put you in harm’s way, because your bike broke down, or you slipped on some loose shale and slid down a rocky embankment and injured your legs or your back. Or an even worse scenario, you're out there, just outside the tide-water and your boat starts taking on water. Just what would you do?

Most everyone today has their pick of the latest technological devices to communicate with family, friends, the outside world. But if your part of that group, we mentioned above, that enjoys pushing their limits and are usually in remote locations, where cell phone coverage is spotty if available at all, then things can get a little dicey.

So, what do you do? You're out there, alone, maybe injured, or out mountain-biking in unfamiliar surroundings, or off out there on the water and your boat starts taking on water and you can’t raise anyone on the radio, or your cell phone, you could be in deep trouble! Well, there is a device that can connect you anywhere in the world, so you can get help, by getting in contact with them via a text message. That device is called the inReach, Satellite communicator by Garmin

Most anyone who is into either fitness or relies on finding their way with a reliable, accurate GPS device is familiar with the name of Garmin. They practically developed the current GPS navigation system and are one of the leaders in providing GPS devices that can fit on your wrist, held in your hand or mounted to a bike to provide you with turn by turn directions to help you find your way to where you need to be.

Garmin has invested in satellite technology via a 100% global Iridium® satellite network. You are virtually connected via text messages to those that you allow to receive them. This way you can stay in contact from Alaska to a remote mountain village in Colombia, if necessary. And if your injured, or taken ill and need help the Garmin inReach Handheld Communicator with GPS  can send an “SOS” communication signal complete with your GPS coordinates to a 24/7 monitoring center, where you can text back and forth with that support person, about the nature of your emergency, and receive a confirmation when help is on the way!

These handheld satellite communicators are designed for the outdoor enthusiast who wants to roam further and experience more – without compromising their loved ones‘ peace of mind. From backcountry experiences to international adventures, the inReach provides communication, location sharing, navigation and critical SOS functions for anyone who loves getting away from it all, on land, water or in the skies.

Using the worldwide coverage of the Iridium satellite network, these go-anywhere portable devices let you exchange text messages with any cell phone number or email address anywhere – while using GPS to track and share your journey’s progress. You can also post to social media or even communicate inReach-to-inReach in the field.

You don’t have to worry about being within the range of a cell tower – or encountering spotty coverage in fringe zones or blackout areas. Your inReach communicator works anywhere and everywhere – so you’re never out of range, never out of reach!

Just to provide some examples of how well this communication device works out in the field, we’ve provided a few actual transcripts of events where the Garmin inReach Handheld Communicator provided the necessary direct access to a monitoring technician who dispatched emergency services where they were needed.


Using an inReach SE in California, U.S. – A group of backpackers camping in the Caribou Mountain area reported that a mountain lion was stalking the group and charged at them several times in the night. GEOS contacted area law enforcement and a game warden to request assistance. Law enforcement could not fly into the area at night, but officers stayed in contact with the group via text to provide advice and encourage them to stay vigilant. At daylight, the group hiked out. There was no sign of the mountain lion during the day, but they remained in contact with GEOS and law enforcement until they reached their cars safely.

On Friday with an inReach Explorer+ in California, U.S., A subscriber reported that a family member was experiencing chest pains and having trouble breathing while in the Sierra National Forest. Local search and rescue evacuated the individual via helicopter to a hospital for treatment.

Sunday with an inReach Explorer+ in British Columbia, Canada – A subscriber experienced snow blindness while mountain climbing with a group. Search and rescue transported the subscriber via helicopter to an area hospital.

Sunday with an inReach Explorer in Washington, U.S. – A subscriber reported that a third-party individual fell while descending Mt. Adams and sustained several injuries. A search and rescue ground team arrived, and the individual was eventually transported by helicopter to an area hospital.

Knowing that your never really alone can give you that extra bit of confidence when you're out on your own, doing what you love to be doing. Keeping a Garmin inReach Communicator with you on your excursions can be that “Ace-in-a-Hole” that sees that you get home safely to friends and family. So, don’t YOU want to be “inReach”?


Read more

Summer Also Means Cycling Fun!

Yes, the warmer weather is here and many of us have dusted off our bikes to get reacquainted with our favorite biking trails. You may have had to give your bike a once over to make sure it's in the best condition it can be. After all, you need to rely on it in order to get you out there on those trails and more importantly, bring you back safely, and without any mishaps.

In order to make sure your bikes up to the challenge, we put together a few simple checks you can make in order to be sure your bikes ready to peddle you onward.

1. Clean It! OK, that sounds like the obvious, but we mean properly clean it! Rinse it thoroughly, making sure to get into all the nooks and crannies, apply a reputable bike cleaner of your choice and leave to stand for a few minutes, then rinse clean.

Stick your bike in a stand and dry it with an industrial-spec paper cloth. Yes, it may be more cost effective to use that grease and mud-encrusted promotional t-shirt you have lying in the corner, but the point of this exercise is cleaning. Drying, as well as cleaning not only makes sure that all the muck is removed but also leaves the bike cleaner so that there’s no residue or paint damage. An old toothbrush is great for de-mudding cassettes and removing the wheels will help you to get right into the rear linkage.

2. Lubricate It: Think about the parts of your bike which rely on a good smothering of grease to move smoothly. Headsets, axles, bottom brackets and dropper/seatposts are all great places for mud, moisture and hasty post-ride, pre-pub washes to strip off the grease. A good quality bike-specific grease will hang around for as long as possible and a torque wrench will help to eliminate any creaks.

3. New bits (tires, grips, chain, lube)
You’ve got the whole summer of ripping turns ahead of you, so why not freshen up your ride? A new chain, cassette, and inner gear cables can make an unbelievable difference and will really go a long way towards replicating that ‘new bike’ feeling. New grips offer a nice new perch for your hands and new tires will open up levels of gripping the road, which has gradually disappeared from memory as your tread depth has worn away.
Why not try switching up your seat set-up slightly too? Moving your position around, even slightly, can dramatically alter how your bike feels out on the trails and won’t cost you a penny.

4. Seal lube:
Your suspension stanchions have been oscillating back and forth through their seals all winter long. Each cycle stripping grit and re-lubing in oil in equal measures. Every-Single-Cycle. Worth showing them some love then? Probably, yeah!
Take some fork oil on a cloth and apply it liberally to the base of the stanchion where it first contacts the seal. Cycle the fork or shock through its travel a couple of times, clean off any excess then repeat. If you’re lucky enough to have air-sprung suspension, then take a second to check your pressures.

Now that the basic checklist is complete, you may want to consider adding another component to your bikes arsenal. Lights. Yes, its summer and the daylight hours stretch out now for a couple hours and its light enough to see after 9 pm on most summer evenings. But with the passing of the 4th of July, the daylight hours are beginning to decline. And there may come times when you’re out at night and the shadows begin to encroach upon your biking trail. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a good reliable cycling lamp mounted to your ride so that you can not only see where you're going and what’s coming up around the corner, but any on-coming traffic can also be seen, by YOU!

The Garmin Varia Smart Cycling Light  is one such lamp! The Varia smart bike lights help to create a safer riding environment by adjusting to changing light conditions as well as bike speed when paired with select Garmin Edge computers. As speed increases, the headlight automatically projects light further ahead, to where it’s needed most. As the ambient light fades or gets brighter, both the headlight and tail light adjust automatically when paired with a light-sensing Edge 1000 bike computer. Beam cutoff prevents headlight from blinding oncoming drivers.

So, there you have it. With your bike having passed its checklist with flying colors and you're incorporating a safety zone of illumination by mounting the Garmin Varia Cycling light to your bike, your now ready to see where you're going and more importantly be seen by oncoming traffic.

It just gives you a sense of “ piece of mind” that you're doing all you can do in order to have some fun as you cycle, safely on down the road.

 

Read more

Yes, the warmer weather is here and many of us have dusted off our bikes to get reacquainted with our favorite biking trails. You may have had to give your bike a once over to make sure it's in the best condition it can be. After all, you need to rely on it in order to get you out there on those trails and more importantly, bring you back safely, and without any mishaps.

In order to make sure your bikes up to the challenge, we put together a few simple checks you can make in order to be sure your bikes ready to peddle you onward.

1. Clean It! OK, that sounds like the obvious, but we mean properly clean it! Rinse it thoroughly, making sure to get into all the nooks and crannies, apply a reputable bike cleaner of your choice and leave to stand for a few minutes, then rinse clean.

Stick your bike in a stand and dry it with an industrial-spec paper cloth. Yes, it may be more cost effective to use that grease and mud-encrusted promotional t-shirt you have lying in the corner, but the point of this exercise is cleaning. Drying, as well as cleaning not only makes sure that all the muck is removed but also leaves the bike cleaner so that there’s no residue or paint damage. An old toothbrush is great for de-mudding cassettes and removing the wheels will help you to get right into the rear linkage.

2. Lubricate It: Think about the parts of your bike which rely on a good smothering of grease to move smoothly. Headsets, axles, bottom brackets and dropper/seatposts are all great places for mud, moisture and hasty post-ride, pre-pub washes to strip off the grease. A good quality bike-specific grease will hang around for as long as possible and a torque wrench will help to eliminate any creaks.

3. New bits (tires, grips, chain, lube)
You’ve got the whole summer of ripping turns ahead of you, so why not freshen up your ride? A new chain, cassette, and inner gear cables can make an unbelievable difference and will really go a long way towards replicating that ‘new bike’ feeling. New grips offer a nice new perch for your hands and new tires will open up levels of gripping the road, which has gradually disappeared from memory as your tread depth has worn away.
Why not try switching up your seat set-up slightly too? Moving your position around, even slightly, can dramatically alter how your bike feels out on the trails and won’t cost you a penny.

4. Seal lube:
Your suspension stanchions have been oscillating back and forth through their seals all winter long. Each cycle stripping grit and re-lubing in oil in equal measures. Every-Single-Cycle. Worth showing them some love then? Probably, yeah!
Take some fork oil on a cloth and apply it liberally to the base of the stanchion where it first contacts the seal. Cycle the fork or shock through its travel a couple of times, clean off any excess then repeat. If you’re lucky enough to have air-sprung suspension, then take a second to check your pressures.

Now that the basic checklist is complete, you may want to consider adding another component to your bikes arsenal. Lights. Yes, its summer and the daylight hours stretch out now for a couple hours and its light enough to see after 9 pm on most summer evenings. But with the passing of the 4th of July, the daylight hours are beginning to decline. And there may come times when you’re out at night and the shadows begin to encroach upon your biking trail. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a good reliable cycling lamp mounted to your ride so that you can not only see where you're going and what’s coming up around the corner, but any on-coming traffic can also be seen, by YOU!

The Garmin Varia Smart Cycling Light  is one such lamp! The Varia smart bike lights help to create a safer riding environment by adjusting to changing light conditions as well as bike speed when paired with select Garmin Edge computers. As speed increases, the headlight automatically projects light further ahead, to where it’s needed most. As the ambient light fades or gets brighter, both the headlight and tail light adjust automatically when paired with a light-sensing Edge 1000 bike computer. Beam cutoff prevents headlight from blinding oncoming drivers.

So, there you have it. With your bike having passed its checklist with flying colors and you're incorporating a safety zone of illumination by mounting the Garmin Varia Cycling light to your bike, your now ready to see where you're going and more importantly be seen by oncoming traffic.

It just gives you a sense of “ piece of mind” that you're doing all you can do in order to have some fun as you cycle, safely on down the road.

 

Read more

Inspect, Inflate And Go!

Ok, it’s now approaching the end of April, in fact, it’s the last full week, and the weather is just now beginning to corporate in as such I can begin thinking of getting my bike out and hitting the roads and trails around where I live. Here in the northeast, we have been seeing more white than green and the temperatures have been hovering closer to 30 than 50 degrees.

Sure, we’ve had a couple of teasers as far as warm weather goes, but those days, were far and few and when they did make an appearance, well like most of us, we tried to make use of that time to try and get our yards cleaned up from what Mother Nature deposited on our lawns throughout the long, cold winter.

But, I think that is all behind us and even if the temperatures do drop down to a chilly state, we can handle it, especially if we know in advance and dress a little warmer, than we would normally like. That being said, there are a few needed steps you need to go through in order to make sure your bike is ready to take you where and as far as you want to go.

1. Dig Out Your Bike! Get your bike out of the garage, down from the loft storage or any place that its been stored since your last excursion. Hopefully where you’ve had it stored up off of its tires this past winter to a place where you have room to check it out.

2. Give those pedals and tires a couple of turns: Make sure everything glides properly, without any rubbing or snagging. Make sure the chain moves smoothly, without any skips or stiff spots, and listen for any clicking, popping, or grinding noises, which can indicate drivetrain issues, and make sure you check your bike’s gears by shifting through all the possible gear combinations. It’s a little too late if you run into trouble out on a secluded road or path and your bike fails to shift gears properly!

3. Pump up your tires to your preferred tire pressure; 24 hours later, check the pressure again. If a tube goes flat immediately, it needs to be replaced. If it loses more than 75 percent of its air overnight, it’s probably time to replace the tubes.
If you have tubeless tires, make sure that the sealant inside is still liquid. If not, clean them out and fill them up again.

4. Tighten Things Up! Check all of the nuts and bolts to make sure they haven’t loosened. You’ll want to use a torque wrench to make sure you’re tightening them to the correct spec. While you’re doing that, watch out for bolts that have seized. Nothing can be more frustrating than snapping a bolt or nut, just because you think tighter is better. It's not, this is why you need to periodically go over your fasteners to make sure none are becoming too loose.
Keep in mind, all of the above you should be able to take care of all by yourself. If you find one of these problems and you’re not comfortable doing work on your own, take your bike to a reputable bike shop. While tune-up costs can vary widely between shops, most will run you between $45 and $75, and you’ll have the peace of mind knowing your bike is safe and ready to ride for the rest of the season.

Even if you decide that your bike is in good working order, it still doesn’t hurt to take it to a reliable bike-shop and get a safety check done. A mechanic will go over the bike and confirm everything is in tip-top shape, a process that usually only takes a few minutes and dollars to do. Think of it this way, most states have yearly car inspections, it makes sense to treat the integrity of your bike's mechanical parts the same way.  Then you have the peace of mind of having a dependable bike under you, and you should be ready to get out there and enjoy your ride.

Now, that we covered the Basic-Spring-Bike-Checkup, we can concentrate on the whole purpose of why you’re getting your bike ready for the road. To get out and peddle! Going for a couple of miles bike ride is very enjoyable, but if you are one of the biker elites, you may venture out to go on some very long rides, perhaps even participate in a hundred or a few hundred-mile bike-endurance run.

These runs are nothing to take lightly and are only for the more experienced biker. You have to be in proper physical condition, and of course, your bike is of the kind that can handle any kind of rough or smooth terrain. Making sure your staying on the proper course is very important too! Over the years personal GPS devices have become more popular and there are a lot of companies out there that provide them, from bike computers that are mounted to your bikes, frame, ones that easily detach and if you want can be used in other forms of transportation like motorcycles and autos. But for reliability and accurate course plots, nothing beats a GPS computer tailored for a bike! Now it took me a bit of time to convert from downloading a preset course from the web and carrying it with me as I took part in these long-distance runs. And this is fine if you consider yourself a purist at heart.  But finding a good reliable terrain map is not always an easy option, especially if you happen to run across a complicated bike run challenge.

Cycling has always been about adventure and enjoying the fact that I was seeing new areas and vistas, for me, sometimes a wrong turn can lead you somewhere beautiful. And truthfully, relying on others for partial route knowledge on long rides has been a great way to meet people and make new friends.

But, having the ability to use an onboard GPS navigation unit is definitely a plus when your biking on trails that you were never on before. Participating in these types of rides are all but impossible without route directions guiding your way.  Turn-by-turn navigation is necessary if you plan on competing in these runs at an individual level against a clock. After all, if your competing, the longer it takes you to bring out your smartphone or unfold a course map to make sure you're on the right path, the longer your overall time will be when you cross that finish line.

After making up my mind and doing a lot of online research and looking at reviews, I decided on the Garmin Edge-520  It's compact and rugged, which was a big factor for me and it's 15+ hour battery life make the Edge 520 perfect for off-road trails and competitive biking. It’s also compatible with GPS/GLONASS satellites, so you benefit from more signal options, wherever your ride takes you, and never have to wonder just where you are in relation to your checkpoints on the course.

Uploading and enabling the "MapMyGPS" route was straightforward, and starting out on my journey, the device would beep 300 feet before upcoming turns, giving me both the street name and turn directions. This provided me with plenty of time to be aware of what and when I needed to do something. I could keep the course displayed on its screen in order to view upcoming course features or rely solely on those notifications while looking at other ride stats like my power average or speed.

I found that if I did happen to make a wrong turn, which was, of course, my fault in NOT paying attention, the Edge 520 brought me back on course by letting out a booming "Off Course” alert, with the aid of which I was able to correct my mistake instantly! Now having something with you like the Garmin Edge-520 provides you with a bit of a safety net. There is nothing like having a reliable device that can pinpoint your location with the aid of those GLONASS satellites overhead. Since my goal this year is bike through at least 3 national parks this year, having the Garmin Edge with me can give me accurate course adjustments if I want to get off the normal bike trails and take in the scenic beauty that each park has to offer.

So there you have it, give your bike a good once over and if need be, take it to your local bike shop for in-depth checks and when all is checked, get out there and enjoy the clean fresh air via your bike-seat and see where that open road or mountain path leads you. And if you take along that the Garmin Edge-520 , you can be sure your going to arrive at your specific destination, safely and best of all with its smartphone connectivity, your friends and family will know where you are, when you are. Happy Biking!

Read more

Ok, it’s now approaching the end of April, in fact, it’s the last full week, and the weather is just now beginning to corporate in as such I can begin thinking of getting my bike out and hitting the roads and trails around where I live. Here in the northeast, we have been seeing more white than green and the temperatures have been hovering closer to 30 than 50 degrees.

Sure, we’ve had a couple of teasers as far as warm weather goes, but those days, were far and few and when they did make an appearance, well like most of us, we tried to make use of that time to try and get our yards cleaned up from what Mother Nature deposited on our lawns throughout the long, cold winter.

But, I think that is all behind us and even if the temperatures do drop down to a chilly state, we can handle it, especially if we know in advance and dress a little warmer, than we would normally like. That being said, there are a few needed steps you need to go through in order to make sure your bike is ready to take you where and as far as you want to go.

1. Dig Out Your Bike! Get your bike out of the garage, down from the loft storage or any place that its been stored since your last excursion. Hopefully where you’ve had it stored up off of its tires this past winter to a place where you have room to check it out.

2. Give those pedals and tires a couple of turns: Make sure everything glides properly, without any rubbing or snagging. Make sure the chain moves smoothly, without any skips or stiff spots, and listen for any clicking, popping, or grinding noises, which can indicate drivetrain issues, and make sure you check your bike’s gears by shifting through all the possible gear combinations. It’s a little too late if you run into trouble out on a secluded road or path and your bike fails to shift gears properly!

3. Pump up your tires to your preferred tire pressure; 24 hours later, check the pressure again. If a tube goes flat immediately, it needs to be replaced. If it loses more than 75 percent of its air overnight, it’s probably time to replace the tubes.
If you have tubeless tires, make sure that the sealant inside is still liquid. If not, clean them out and fill them up again.

4. Tighten Things Up! Check all of the nuts and bolts to make sure they haven’t loosened. You’ll want to use a torque wrench to make sure you’re tightening them to the correct spec. While you’re doing that, watch out for bolts that have seized. Nothing can be more frustrating than snapping a bolt or nut, just because you think tighter is better. It's not, this is why you need to periodically go over your fasteners to make sure none are becoming too loose.
Keep in mind, all of the above you should be able to take care of all by yourself. If you find one of these problems and you’re not comfortable doing work on your own, take your bike to a reputable bike shop. While tune-up costs can vary widely between shops, most will run you between $45 and $75, and you’ll have the peace of mind knowing your bike is safe and ready to ride for the rest of the season.

Even if you decide that your bike is in good working order, it still doesn’t hurt to take it to a reliable bike-shop and get a safety check done. A mechanic will go over the bike and confirm everything is in tip-top shape, a process that usually only takes a few minutes and dollars to do. Think of it this way, most states have yearly car inspections, it makes sense to treat the integrity of your bike's mechanical parts the same way.  Then you have the peace of mind of having a dependable bike under you, and you should be ready to get out there and enjoy your ride.

Now, that we covered the Basic-Spring-Bike-Checkup, we can concentrate on the whole purpose of why you’re getting your bike ready for the road. To get out and peddle! Going for a couple of miles bike ride is very enjoyable, but if you are one of the biker elites, you may venture out to go on some very long rides, perhaps even participate in a hundred or a few hundred-mile bike-endurance run.

These runs are nothing to take lightly and are only for the more experienced biker. You have to be in proper physical condition, and of course, your bike is of the kind that can handle any kind of rough or smooth terrain. Making sure your staying on the proper course is very important too! Over the years personal GPS devices have become more popular and there are a lot of companies out there that provide them, from bike computers that are mounted to your bikes, frame, ones that easily detach and if you want can be used in other forms of transportation like motorcycles and autos. But for reliability and accurate course plots, nothing beats a GPS computer tailored for a bike! Now it took me a bit of time to convert from downloading a preset course from the web and carrying it with me as I took part in these long-distance runs. And this is fine if you consider yourself a purist at heart.  But finding a good reliable terrain map is not always an easy option, especially if you happen to run across a complicated bike run challenge.

Cycling has always been about adventure and enjoying the fact that I was seeing new areas and vistas, for me, sometimes a wrong turn can lead you somewhere beautiful. And truthfully, relying on others for partial route knowledge on long rides has been a great way to meet people and make new friends.

But, having the ability to use an onboard GPS navigation unit is definitely a plus when your biking on trails that you were never on before. Participating in these types of rides are all but impossible without route directions guiding your way.  Turn-by-turn navigation is necessary if you plan on competing in these runs at an individual level against a clock. After all, if your competing, the longer it takes you to bring out your smartphone or unfold a course map to make sure you're on the right path, the longer your overall time will be when you cross that finish line.

After making up my mind and doing a lot of online research and looking at reviews, I decided on the Garmin Edge-520  It's compact and rugged, which was a big factor for me and it's 15+ hour battery life make the Edge 520 perfect for off-road trails and competitive biking. It’s also compatible with GPS/GLONASS satellites, so you benefit from more signal options, wherever your ride takes you, and never have to wonder just where you are in relation to your checkpoints on the course.

Uploading and enabling the "MapMyGPS" route was straightforward, and starting out on my journey, the device would beep 300 feet before upcoming turns, giving me both the street name and turn directions. This provided me with plenty of time to be aware of what and when I needed to do something. I could keep the course displayed on its screen in order to view upcoming course features or rely solely on those notifications while looking at other ride stats like my power average or speed.

I found that if I did happen to make a wrong turn, which was, of course, my fault in NOT paying attention, the Edge 520 brought me back on course by letting out a booming "Off Course” alert, with the aid of which I was able to correct my mistake instantly! Now having something with you like the Garmin Edge-520 provides you with a bit of a safety net. There is nothing like having a reliable device that can pinpoint your location with the aid of those GLONASS satellites overhead. Since my goal this year is bike through at least 3 national parks this year, having the Garmin Edge with me can give me accurate course adjustments if I want to get off the normal bike trails and take in the scenic beauty that each park has to offer.

So there you have it, give your bike a good once over and if need be, take it to your local bike shop for in-depth checks and when all is checked, get out there and enjoy the clean fresh air via your bike-seat and see where that open road or mountain path leads you. And if you take along that the Garmin Edge-520 , you can be sure your going to arrive at your specific destination, safely and best of all with its smartphone connectivity, your friends and family will know where you are, when you are. Happy Biking!

Read more

Want To Go The Distance, But Maybe Your Knees Just Aren’t Up To It?

Well, Get That Bike Out Of The Garage and Go The Distance!

You know that you want to get yourself active and start living a healthier lifestyle. You already made the commitment to eating healthier and now that you’re putting down the bag of potato chips and trading them in for pita chips and humus, the time is ripe to give your heart and your body’s circulatory and cardiovascular system a workout so you can be that mean, lean physical specimen you always wanted to be… Well, at least a healthier version of what you were last year 

You know you tried the walking around the block system, and that just didn’t do it for you. Not that you got bored with it, well, maybe just a little, but you found your knees just couldn’t handle the shock of your feet hitting the pavement over a period of time. And let’s face it, you need to rack up some miles walking to get the benefits you’re looking for, while trying to get yourself in shape, you need to listen to your body’s aches and pains. That is your body trying to communicate with you. If you’re hurting after you’ve been hitting the streets or trails recently there is another option you may want to try to let you keep being active and pushing your body for its health.

What most of us do not realize is that stuck in the back of most of our garages is a bicycle. Or at least we all have memories of having one. Well now that you’re a little older, biking is probably one of the best forms of physical exercise next to swimming (And that will be another blog post later) that you can do for yourself!

Whether you're young or old, athletic or sedentary, bicycling is an enjoyable and healthy way to travel and experience the outdoors. Done vigorously, it gives the heart and circulatory system a workout and can burn more than 500 calories per hour. The development of new types of bicycles—notably the hybrid, which combines the speed of a road bike and the ruggedness of a mountain bike—has made riding easier and offers more options to suit your specific needs. What's more, cyclists now have more places to ride.

Cycling's low impact, so you can keep going longer, and it’s a sustained stamina training form of exercise as well. If you already experience twinges in your knees. Powering your bike is called "Cycling Power" which is generated by your glutes, quads and hamstrings. So it won't be long before you start to see some improvements in the overall strength and definition of your legs and thighs, without putting a lot of strain on your knees and calf muscles.

Now before you just go climbing onto the old bike saddle (seat) and hit the open road, there are a few things you need to have checked out first!
1. Is your health, get yourself checked out by your doctor, just to make sure there are no issues that would prevent you from undertaking this new form of physical activity.
2. If you have a bike, get it to a reputable bike shop to have it checked out. The last thing you need is to go off on the road or bike trails and have a breakdown with your bike.
3. If you don’t have a bike, refer back to number 2 above and get yourself to that bike shop and talk with them. Let them know what you plan on doing. Tell them this is not a purchase for an occasional bike ride, that you will be putting some serious miles on your new bike and want one that is suited to your current body frame. Believe me, if they are good at what they do, they will pair you up with the right bike to fit your needs, even a combo bike that is good for the roads but is also adequate for some easier bike trails as well.
4. Get yourself a helmet! This is probably the first thing you need to do, after getting yourself checked out by your doctor. And since you’re going to the bike shop anyway, ask them to fit your head with the right helmet. These can be a little tricky, so let them help you.

That’s about it for the important part of what you need to get yourself out in the open and enjoying the beauty of the scenery around you.

Now, one thing you may want to consider is getting yourself a good GPS bike computer/navigator to take with you as you venture out further than your living area. Now you won’t need one if you’re just going to be biking around the neighborhood 15 times a day, but that really goes beyond boring.

We like the Garmin Edge 520 GPS Bike Computer  Because it not only offers some of the best features that Garmin has engineered over the past decade or more, but now they have developed an easy to view smart screen that can be easily seen in the daylight, which before ow, presented some problems. So now you can not only see where you are but with the Bluetooth functionality built into the Garmin 520, your friends can see just where you are as well, as the device’s data can be uploaded to the Garmin community up there in the vastness of space called the internet!

Just kidding but yes your friends can see and follow your progress, so besides sharing this bike course with your friends, you never have to worry about them not knowing where you are!

One of the key reasons a lot of people that are say, mid 30’s and are starting to feel the aches and pains of going for a long run, sprints or up and down mountain trails is their knees, calf’s or ankles can’t take that impact from having them pounding the ground. So, cycling is the best next thing to keeping yourself fit, and enjoying the outdoors in and around where you live.

And since you decided to take to the open road or mountain trails, its a good idea to be able to see where your going if your ride finds you still wheeling around and its starting to get dark. You want to make sure you have a reliable lighting system on that 2-wheeler of yours and the Garmin Varia Smart Bike Lights will do the trick!

So, what are you waiting for, get that bike ready and start enjoying the summer sunshine out on a bike ride. But don’t forget that helmet. I want you around to read our next post.

Stay safe, have fun! From your support team here at HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com !

 

Read more

Well, Get That Bike Out Of The Garage and Go The Distance!

You know that you want to get yourself active and start living a healthier lifestyle. You already made the commitment to eating healthier and now that you’re putting down the bag of potato chips and trading them in for pita chips and humus, the time is ripe to give your heart and your body’s circulatory and cardiovascular system a workout so you can be that mean, lean physical specimen you always wanted to be… Well, at least a healthier version of what you were last year 

You know you tried the walking around the block system, and that just didn’t do it for you. Not that you got bored with it, well, maybe just a little, but you found your knees just couldn’t handle the shock of your feet hitting the pavement over a period of time. And let’s face it, you need to rack up some miles walking to get the benefits you’re looking for, while trying to get yourself in shape, you need to listen to your body’s aches and pains. That is your body trying to communicate with you. If you’re hurting after you’ve been hitting the streets or trails recently there is another option you may want to try to let you keep being active and pushing your body for its health.

What most of us do not realize is that stuck in the back of most of our garages is a bicycle. Or at least we all have memories of having one. Well now that you’re a little older, biking is probably one of the best forms of physical exercise next to swimming (And that will be another blog post later) that you can do for yourself!

Whether you're young or old, athletic or sedentary, bicycling is an enjoyable and healthy way to travel and experience the outdoors. Done vigorously, it gives the heart and circulatory system a workout and can burn more than 500 calories per hour. The development of new types of bicycles—notably the hybrid, which combines the speed of a road bike and the ruggedness of a mountain bike—has made riding easier and offers more options to suit your specific needs. What's more, cyclists now have more places to ride.

Cycling's low impact, so you can keep going longer, and it’s a sustained stamina training form of exercise as well. If you already experience twinges in your knees. Powering your bike is called "Cycling Power" which is generated by your glutes, quads and hamstrings. So it won't be long before you start to see some improvements in the overall strength and definition of your legs and thighs, without putting a lot of strain on your knees and calf muscles.

Now before you just go climbing onto the old bike saddle (seat) and hit the open road, there are a few things you need to have checked out first!
1. Is your health, get yourself checked out by your doctor, just to make sure there are no issues that would prevent you from undertaking this new form of physical activity.
2. If you have a bike, get it to a reputable bike shop to have it checked out. The last thing you need is to go off on the road or bike trails and have a breakdown with your bike.
3. If you don’t have a bike, refer back to number 2 above and get yourself to that bike shop and talk with them. Let them know what you plan on doing. Tell them this is not a purchase for an occasional bike ride, that you will be putting some serious miles on your new bike and want one that is suited to your current body frame. Believe me, if they are good at what they do, they will pair you up with the right bike to fit your needs, even a combo bike that is good for the roads but is also adequate for some easier bike trails as well.
4. Get yourself a helmet! This is probably the first thing you need to do, after getting yourself checked out by your doctor. And since you’re going to the bike shop anyway, ask them to fit your head with the right helmet. These can be a little tricky, so let them help you.

That’s about it for the important part of what you need to get yourself out in the open and enjoying the beauty of the scenery around you.

Now, one thing you may want to consider is getting yourself a good GPS bike computer/navigator to take with you as you venture out further than your living area. Now you won’t need one if you’re just going to be biking around the neighborhood 15 times a day, but that really goes beyond boring.

We like the Garmin Edge 520 GPS Bike Computer  Because it not only offers some of the best features that Garmin has engineered over the past decade or more, but now they have developed an easy to view smart screen that can be easily seen in the daylight, which before ow, presented some problems. So now you can not only see where you are but with the Bluetooth functionality built into the Garmin 520, your friends can see just where you are as well, as the device’s data can be uploaded to the Garmin community up there in the vastness of space called the internet!

Just kidding but yes your friends can see and follow your progress, so besides sharing this bike course with your friends, you never have to worry about them not knowing where you are!

One of the key reasons a lot of people that are say, mid 30’s and are starting to feel the aches and pains of going for a long run, sprints or up and down mountain trails is their knees, calf’s or ankles can’t take that impact from having them pounding the ground. So, cycling is the best next thing to keeping yourself fit, and enjoying the outdoors in and around where you live.

And since you decided to take to the open road or mountain trails, its a good idea to be able to see where your going if your ride finds you still wheeling around and its starting to get dark. You want to make sure you have a reliable lighting system on that 2-wheeler of yours and the Garmin Varia Smart Bike Lights will do the trick!

So, what are you waiting for, get that bike ready and start enjoying the summer sunshine out on a bike ride. But don’t forget that helmet. I want you around to read our next post.

Stay safe, have fun! From your support team here at HeartRateMonitorsUSA.com !

 

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